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PARTS
VIEW SOLUTIONS TO COMMON PROBLEMS
PARTS

Clutch Cable
Clutch Master Cylinder
Clutch Slave Cylinder
Bleeding The System
Release Fork
Release (Throwout) Bearing
Pressure Plate (Cover Assembly)
Clutch Disc
Flywheel
Pilot Bearing
SOLUTIONS
Select a part to view solution for common problems associated with the item.
Operation: The clutch cable transfers the motion of the clutch pedal to the release fork. On most modern vehicles the clutch cable has been replaced with a hydraulically operated system. Advice: Over time, most clutch cables will stretch. Periodic adjustment is necessary to maintain proper clutch operation. Some cable actuated clutch systems employ an automatic cable adjuster. Check the repair guides for the vehicle that you are working on. Recommendations: Repair guides
Operation: In a hydraulic clutch system, the clutch master cylinder is responsible for creating the hydraulic pressure that physically moves the release fork. Advice: Use care when disconnecting the hydraulic lines. Some are made of plastic and can become brittle over time. The plastic style line disconnect in various ways. Check the repair guides for the vehicle that you are working on. Most of the types with metal lines use hollow fittings called flare nuts or line fittings. Because flare nuts are hollow they are susceptible to damage if a normal open ended wrench is used to remove them. Flare nut wrenches, sometimes called line wrenches are special open ended wrenches designed to slide over the hydraulic line and still provide maximum grip on all sides of the fitting. Apply a generous spray of penetrating oil to the threads of the fittings and allow it to soak in before loosening the fittings. Recommendations: Flare Nut Wrench set Penetrating spray Repair guides
Operation: In a hydraulic clutch system, the slave cylinder reacts to the hydraulic pressure created by the master cylinder, physically moving the release fork. Most hydraulic clutch systems are self adjusting however some slave cylinders do have an adjustable push rod. Advice: Use care when disconnecting the hydraulic lines. Some are made of plastic and can become brittle over time. The plastic style line disconnect in various ways. Check the repair guides for the vehicle that you are working on. Most of the types with metal lines use hollow fittings called flare nuts or line fittings. Because flare nuts are hollow they are susceptible to damage if a normal open ended wrench is used to remove them. Flare nut wrenches, sometimes called line wrenches are special open ended wrenches designed to slide over the hydraulic line and still provide maximum grip on all sides of the fitting. Apply a generous spray of penetrating oil to the threads of the fittings and allow it to soak in before loosening the fittings. Some slave cylinders are mounted inside the transmission bell housing, and will require the removal of the transmission to gain access. Recommendations: Flare Nut Wrench set Penetrating spray Repair guides
Advice: Most hydraulic clutch systems can be gravity bled. This is accomplished by filling the reservoir then opening the bleeder screw on the slave cylinder and letting the fluid run through the system until all of the air is removed, filling the reservoir along the way as needed. Some stubborn systems will require a helper to depress the pedal while the bleeder is open then let up on the pedal after the bleeder is closed. A pressure bleeder can also be used.
Operation: The release fork pivots like a teeter totter transmitting the motion of the clutch cable or slave cylinder to the motion of the release bearing against the diaphragm spring of the pressure plate. Advice: Check the wear point where the slave cylinder push rod contacts the fork and also the pivot point for wear. On some vehicles the pivot point can be replaced if there is extensive wear. The only other damage that could warrant replacement of the release fork would be if it were bent from an accident or from being forced against a frozen pressure plate assembly. Lubricate the pivot point and push rod contact point with a small amount of grease before reinstallation.
Operation: The release bearing, often referred to as the throw-out bearing is the part that makes contact with the spinning pressure plate assembly. Advice: Always install a new release bearing whenever replacing the clutch. Lightly lubricate the slide and contact points with grease before installation.
Operation: The pressure plate, also referred to as the clutch cover assembly is bolted to the flywheel. The clutch disc is sandwiched between the pressure plate and the flywheel. In the clutch released state, the pressure plate and clutch disc rotate as one with the flywheel. When the clutch is applied, the pressure plate releases the pressure that it is exerting on the clutch disc. At this point the pressure plate continues to rotate with the flywheel that it is bolted to but the clutch disc which is splined to the transmission is released. Advice: Always replace the pressure plate when installing a new clutch disc. Failure to do so can result in an inefficient chattering clutch.
Operation: The clutch disc is splined to the input shaft of the transmission. In the clutch released state, the clutch disc and transmission input shaft are forced to rotate with the flywheel. When the clutch is applied the pressure plate releases it's grip on the clutch disc allowing the clutch disc and transmission input shaft to rotate slower, independently of the flywheel so that a gear change can be applied. Advice: The clutch disc must be installed in the right direction. Most replacement clutch discs will be marked with the words flywheel side on one side of the disc. When in doubt check the repair guides for the vehicle that you are working on. After ensuring that the clutch disc is facing the right direction, use a pilot tool to ensure that the center of the clutch disc is in alignment with the pilot bearing in the center of the flywheel. Recommendations: Clutch disc alignment tool. Repair guides
Operation: The flywheel serves a couple of purposes. It provides a friction surface for the clutch disc to ride on. Most flywheels have a ring gear attached to the outside circumference that the starter interacts with to crank the engine. And the bulk of the flywheel acts as a balanced damper absorbing the pulses created from the combustion in each cylinder. Advice: Check the teeth on the ring gear, if there are any broken or chipped teeth, replace the ring gear if it is serviceable. Otherwise replace the flywheel. If the ring gear is in good shape and the flywheel can be reused, have the flywheel resurfaced before reinstalling. This gives the clutch disc a true surface to ride on and helps to ensure a long life out of the new clutch.
Operation: The input shaft of the transmission is supported by the pilot bearing. Advice: Always replace the pilot bearing whenever the clutch is replaced. A worn pilot bearing can cause unwanted noise and can lead to worn out bearings and leaking oil seals on the transmission input shaft.
*This image does not represent the actual look of your selected vehicle. Please refer to any car manual to see specific part.