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    Toyota Previa 1991-1997 Repair Information

    Exhaust Gas Recirculation System

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    OPERATION



    The EGR system reduces oxides of nitrogen. This is accomplished by recirculating some of the exhaust gases through the EGR valve to the intake manifold, lowering peak combustion temperatures.

    COMPONENT TESTING



    2TZ-FE Engine
    SYSTEM CHECK

    See Figures 1 through 6



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 1: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system components-1991-92 2TZ-FE engine



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 2: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system components-1993-95 2TZ-FE engine

    1. Check and clean the filter in the EGR vacuum modulator. Use compressed air (if possible) to blow the dirt out of the filters and check the filters for contamination or damage.
    2.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 3: Check the filter of the EGR modulator for contamination or damage

    1. Using a tee (3-way connector), connect a vacuum gauge to the hose between the EGR valve and the vacuum modulator.
    2.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 4: Place a 3-way union on the EGR valve hose, then connect a vacuum gauge it

    1. Check the seating of the EGR valve by starting the engine and seeing that it runs at a smooth idle. If the valve is not completely closed, the idle will be rough.
    2.  
    3. Connect a tachometer as per manufactures instructions.
    4.  
    5. With the engine coolant temperature below 99°F (37°C), the vacuum gauge should read 0 at 2500 rpm. This indicates that the Bi-metal Vacuum Switching Valve (BVSV) (1991-92 models) or TVV (1993-95 models) is functioning correctly at this temperature range.
    6.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 5: With the coolant level cold, inspect the vacuum gauge reading

    1. Warm the engine to normal operating temperature. Check the vacuum gauge and confirm low vacuum at 2500 rpm.
    2.  



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    Fig. Fig. 6: Inspect the vacuum gauge readings with the engine at normal operating temperature

    1. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the R port on the EGR vacuum modulator and, using another piece of hose, connect the R port directly to the intake manifold. Check that the vacuum gauge indicates high vacuum at 3500 rpm.
    2.  

    Port R is the lower of the two ports. As a large amount of exhaust gas enters, the engine will misfire slightly at this time.

    1. Remove the tachometer.
    2.  
    3. Disconnect the vacuum gauge and reconnect the vacuum hoses to their proper locations.
    4.  
    5. Check the EGR valve by applying vacuum directly to the valve with the engine at idle. (This may be accomplished either by bridging vacuum directly from the intake manifold or by using a hand-held vacuum pump.) The engine should falter and die as the full load of recalculated gasses enters the engine.
    6.  
    7. If no problem is found with this inspection, the system is OK; otherwise inspect each part.
    8.  

    EGR VALVE
    1. Remove the EGR valve.
    2.  
    3. Check the valve for sticking and heavy carbon deposits. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
    4.  
    5. Reinstall the EGR valve with a new gasket.
    6.  

    EGR VACUUM MODULATOR

    See Figures 7, 8 and 9

    1. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from ports P , Q , and R of the EGR vacuum modulator.
    2.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 7: Inspecting the EGR vacuum modulator with the engine stopped

    1. Plug the P and R ports with your fingers.
    2.  
    3. Blow air into port Q . Check that the air passes freely through the sides of the air filter.
    4.  

    Port Q is the single port on the one side of the modulator.

    1. Start the engine and maintain 2500 rpm.
    2.  



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    Fig. Fig. 8: The EGR vacuum modulator has labeled ports



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    Fig. Fig. 9: Inspecting the EGR vacuum modulator with the engine at 2500 rpms

    1. Repeat the test above. Check that there is a strong resistance to air flow.
    2.  
    3. Reconnect the vacuum hoses to the proper locations.
    4.  
    5. If the operation is not as specified, replace the EGR vacuum modulator.
    6.  

    Bimetal Vacuum Switching Valve (BVSV)
    1. Drain and recycle the engine coolant.
    2.  
    3. Remove the BVSV.
    4.  
    5. Cool the BVSV to below 99° F (37° C) with cool water. Blow air into pipe and check that the BVSV is closed.
    6.  
    7. Heat the BVSV to above 133° F (56° C) with hot water. Blow air into pipe and check that the BVSV is open. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
    8.  
    9. Install the BVSV as per instructions.
    10.  
    11. Refill the cooling system with the proper amount of water coolant mixture.
    12.  

    Thermal Vacuum Valve (TVV)

    See Figures 10 and 11

    1. Remove the TVV valve from the engine.
    2.  
    3. Cool the valve to below 99° F (37>deg.> C) with cool water.
    4.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 10: Place the Thermal Vacuum Valve (TVV) into cool water while blowing air into the top port

    1. Make sure that air does not flow from the upper port to the lower port.
    2.  
    3. Heat the TVV to above 133° F (56° C) with hot water.
    4.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 11: Next place the TVV in hot water and apply air to the top port

    1. Check that air flows from the upper port to the lower port of the valve. If the operation is not as specified, replace the TVV valve.
    2.  
    3. Reinstall the TVV valve.
    4.  

    EGR Gas Temperature Sensor

    See Figure 12

    1. Remove the EGR gas temperature sensor.
    2.  
    3. Place the sensor in a container of oil.
    4.  
    5. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between terminals.

      69-89 kilohms @ 112°F (50°C)
       
      11-15 kilohms @ 212°F (100°C)
       
      2-4 kilohms @ 302°F (150°C)
       

    6.  
    7. If the resistance is not within the specifications, replace the sensor.
    8.  
    9. Install and secure the sensor.
    10.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 12: Place the EGR gas temperature sensor in a container of oil and measure the resistance

    2TZ-FZE Engine
    SYSTEM CHECK

    See Figures 13 and 14

    1. Check and clean the filter in the EGR vacuum modulator. Remove the cap and filter, then using compressed air (if possible) to blow the dirt out of the filter and check for contamination or damage. Reinstall the filter and cap.
    2.  

    Install the filter with the coarse side facing outward.

    1. Using a tee (3-way connector), connect a vacuum gauge to the hose between the EGR valve and the VSV.
    2.  
    3. Check the seating of the EGR valve by starting the engine and seeing that it runs at a smooth idle. Check that the EGR valve is fully seated.
    4.  
    5. Connect a Toyota hand-held tester or OBDII scan tool. Refer to the manufactures instructions.
    6.  
    7. Inspect the Vacuum Switching Valve (VSV) with the engine coolant temperature below 113°F (45°C), the vacuum gauge should read 0 at 3500 rpm.
    8.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 13: Read the vacuum gauge between the EGR valve and modulator hoses adjoined

    1. Warm the engine to normal operating temperature. Check the vacuum gauge and confirm zero vacuum at 4500 rpm.
    2.  
    3. Lightly race the engine and check that the vacuum gauge reads a vacuum and then returns to zero vacuum immediately.
    4.  
    5. Checnge the vacuum hose between the EGR valve and the EGR vacuum modulator. Warm the engine to above 122°F (50°C). Check that the vacuum gauge indicates low vacuum at 3500 rpm.
    6.  
    7. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the R port on the EGR vacuum modulator and, using another piece of hose, connect the R port directly to the intake manifold. Check that the vacuum gauge indicates high vacuum at 3500 rpm.
    8.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 14: Locations of port R and Q of the vacuum modulator during testing

    As a large amount of exhaust gas enters, the engine will misfire slightly at this time.

    1. Disconnect the scan tool and vacuum gauge, then reconnect the hoses to their proper locations.
    2.  
    3. Check the EGR valve by applying vacuum directly to the valve with the engine at idle. (This may be accomplished either by bridging vacuum directly from the intake manifold or by using a hand-held vacuum pump.) The engine should falter and die as the full load of recalculated gasses enters the engine.
    4.  
    5. If no problem is found with this inspection, the system is OK; otherwise inspect each part.
    6.  

    EGR VALVE
    1. Remove the EGR valve.
    2.  
    3. Check the valve for sticking and heavy carbon deposits. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
    4.  
    5. Reinstall the EGR valve with a new gasket.
    6.  

    EGR VACUUM MODULATOR

    See Figures 15, 16 and 17

    1. Connect a Toyota hand-held tester or equivalent OBD II scan tool as per manufacturer's instructions to the DLC3.
    2.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 15: Connect the hand-held tester to the OBD II DLC3 port

    1. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from ports P , Q from the EGR vacuum modulator and plug them.
    2.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 16: Inspecting the EGR vacuum modulator with the engine stopped

    1. Disconnect and plug port Q also. Blow air into port Q . Check that the air passes freely through the sides of the air filter.
    2.  
    3. Start the engine and maintain 3500 rpms.
    4.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 17: Inspecting the EGR vacuum modulator with the engine running at 3500 rpm's

    1. Repeat the test above. Check that there is a strong resistance to air flow.
    2.  
    3. Reconnect the vacuum hoses to the proper locations.
    4.  
    5. Disconnect the scan tool.
    6.  

    Vacuum Switching Valve (VSV)-Air filter type

    The VSV is attached to the No. 2 air inlet duct. Some VSV models are equipped with an air filter at the end.

    1. Check that air flows from port E to the air filter.
    2.  
    3. Connect the vacuum switching valve terminals to the battery.
    4.  
    5. Check that air flows from port E to port F .
    6.  
    7. If the VSV fails this test replace it. Any doubts perform the following test.
    8.  
    9. Remove the VSV.
    10.  
    11. Check for an open circuit. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance (ohms) between the two terminals of the valve. The resistance (cold) should be 37-44 ohms. If the resistance is not within specifications, replace the VSV.
    12.  
    13. Check for a short circuit within the valve. Using an ohmmeter, check that there is no continuity between the terminals and the VSV body. If there is continuity, replace the VSV.
    14.  

    Vacuum Switching Valve (VSV)-NON-AIR filter type
    1. Check that air does not flow from port E to port F .
    2.  
    3. Connect the vacuum switching valve terminals to the battery.
    4.  
    5. Check that air flows from port E to port F .
    6.  
    7. If the VSV fails this test replace it. Any doubts perform the following test.
    8.  
    9. Remove the VSV.
    10.  
    11. Check for an open circuit. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance (ohms) between the two terminals of the valve. The resistance (cold) should be 37-44 ohms. If the resistance is not within specifications, replace the VSV.
    12.  
    13. Check for a short circuit within the valve. Using an ohmmeter, check that there is no continuity between the terminals and the VSV body. If there is continuity, replace the VSV.
    14.  

    EGR Gas Temperature Sensor

    See Figure 11

    1. Remove the EGR gas temperature sensor.
    2.  
    3. Place the sensor in a container of oil.
    4.  
    5. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between terminals.

      64-97 kilohms @ 112°F (50°C)
       
      11-16 kilohms @ 212°F (100°C)
       
      2-4 kilohms @ 302°F (150°C)
       

    6.  
    7. If the resistance is not within the specifications, replace the sensor.
    8.  
    9. Install and secure the sensor.
    10.  

    REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



    Bimetal Vacuum Switching Valve (BVSV)

    See Figures 18 and 19

    The Bimetal Vacuum Switching Valve (BVSV) is threaded into the Idle Speed Control (ISC) valve bolted to the throttle body.



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 18: The BVSV is threaded into the IAC bolted to the throttle body

    1. Drain the coolant from the system into a suitable container.
    2.  
    3. Unscrew the BVSV from the Idle Speed Control (ISC) valve.
    4.  

    To install:
    1. Apply liquid sealer to the first 2-3 threads of the BVSV. Carefully thread the valve into the ISC and first tighten the valve to 9 ft. lbs. (12), then tighten the valve until it reached this position. Maximum torque of the valve is 25 ft. lbs. (34 Nm).
    2.  

    Do not rotate the valve counter-clockwise in order to align the port as shown.



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 19: On the second pass of tightening the BVSV, ensure the valve faces between this angle

    1. Fill the cooling system. Start the engine, check and top off the fluid level.
    2.  

    Thermal Vacuum Valve (TVV)

    See Figure 20

    The Thermal Vacuum Valve (TVV) is threaded into the IAC valve bolted to the throttle body. Note the position of the valve prior to removal, it must be facing the same direction on installation.

    1. Drain the coolant the from the engine.
    2.  
    3. Disconnect the vacuum hoses from the charcoal canister and throttle body.
    4.  
    5. Remove the TVV from the Intake Air Control (IAC).
    6.  

    To install:
    1. Apply adhesive to 2 or 3 of the threads of the TVV, first tighten the valve to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm), then tighten it to 25 ft. lbs. (34 Nm) in the position it was removed from.
    2.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 20: Apply adhesive to the first 2 or 3 threads of the valve prior to installation

    1. Reattach the vacuum hoses.
    2.  
    3. Refill the cooling system. Start the engine, check and top off the fluid level.
    4.  

    Vacuum Switching Valve (VSV)

    Disconnect the wiring from the VSV. Label and removed the vacuum hoses from the valve. Loosen the nut and extract the VSV from the No. 2 air inlet duct.

    EGR Gas Temperature Sensor

    The EGR gas temperature sensor is located near the EGR valve usually threaded into the intake manifold.

    1. Remove the engine access hole cover.
    2.  
    3. Located the EGR gas temperature sensor and unscrew it from the engine. If the old gasket is unreusable, discard it
    4.  
    5. Install a new gasket if necessary. place the sensor into position and tighten to 14 ft. lbs. (20 Nm).
    6.  
    7. Install the remaining components.
    8.  

    Check Valve

    See Figures 21 and 22

    1. Remove the check valve from the engine.
    2.  
    3. Blow air into the orange side of the pipe and check for air flow from the orange side.
    4.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 21: Testing the check valve for air flow on each side

    1. Blow air into the orange side of the pipe and check that no air flows from the black side.
    2.  
    3. If the testing is not as specified, replace the check valve.
    4.  
    5. Reinstall the check valve with the orange side facing the No. 2 air inlet duct side.
    6.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 22: Only install the check valve with the orange side facing the No. 2 air inlet duct

    EGR Valve

    See Figures 23 and 24

    To access and remove the EGR valve the engine must be lowered and the both motor mounts removed.

    1. Drain the coolant from the engine.
    2.  
    3. Remove the left engine access hole cover.
    4.  
    5. Remove the motor mount bolts and nuts.
    6.  
    7. Jack up the engine and remove the motor mounts.
    8.  
    9. Slowely lower the engine being careful not to rest the engine weight on the oil filter housing. Place a block of wood where the motor mounts had been to support the engine.
    10.  
    11. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from the throttle body to the EGR valve.
    12.  
    13. Label and disconnect the vacuum modulator hose.
    14.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 23: Remove the union nut, EGR nuts (91) and by-pass hoses (2)



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 24: EGR vacuum modulator (1), EGR valve (2) and bracket retaining bolts are circled

    See Figure 22

    The vacuum modulator is located up under the floor panel behind the EGR valve to the right. It is attached to a bracket along with vacuum hoses.

    1. Remnove the two bolts holding the vacuum modulator with the bracket.
    2.  
    3. Disconnect the No. 3 and 4 water by-pass hoses.
    4.  

    1. Remove the bolt holding the EGR pipe and intake manifold.
    2.  
    3. Remove the 3 nuts and bolt, then extract the EGR valve with the pipe from the intake manifold and cylinder head.
    4.  
    5. Inspect and discard if necessary the gasket fro the valve.
    6.  

    To install:
    1. Install two new gaskets and the EGR valve with the pie attached to the intake manifold and cylinder head. Tighten the three nuts and bolt to 13 ft. lbs. (18 Nm).
    2.  
    3. Install the bolt holding the EGR pipe to the intake manifold and tighten to 13 ft. lbs. (18 Nm).
    4.  
    5. Connect the No. 3 and 4 water by-pass hoses.
    6.  
    7. Insatall the EGR vacuum modulator and bracket with the two bolts and tighten to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm).
    8.  
    9. Attach the vacuum modulator hose. connect the three vacuum hoses to the No. 1 vacuum pipe.
    10.  

    EGR Vacuum Modulator

    See Figure 25

    1. Unbolt the vacuum modulator bracket and extract.
    2.  
    3. Label and disconnect the hoses attached to the modulator.
    4.  
    5. Pull the clips apart and remove the modulator.
    6.  

    To install:
    1. Insert the modulator into the bracket clips.
    2.  
    3. Attach the hoses in their proper positions.
    4.  



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 25: The throttle body ports are marked for the proper hoses

    1. Postion the bracket/modulator assembly on the engine and secure the mounting bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm).
    2.  

     
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