AMC Coupes/Sedans/Wagons 1975-1988 Repair Information

Carburetors

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REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 through 10

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Fig. Fig. 1: To remove the carburetor, disconnect the hoses. Some are secured with clamps



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Fig. Fig. 2: After releasing the clamp, disconnect the hose



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Fig. Fig. 3: Using a flare nut wrench and a back-up wrench, disengage the fuel line nut ...



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Fig. Fig. 4: ... then disconnect the fuel line from the carburetor



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Fig. Fig. 5: Disengage the transmission linkage from the throttle lever assembly ...



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Fig. Fig. 6: ... then disconnect the cable from the bracket by compressing the square tabs



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Fig. Fig. 7: Use a pair of pliers to remove the throttle linkage retaining pin ...



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Fig. Fig. 8: ... then disengage the linkage from the throttle shaft assembly



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Fig. Fig. 9: Unfasten the carburetor retaining bolts. Use an extension if necessary



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Fig. Fig. 10: Remove the carburetor from the intake manifold assembly

  1. Remove the air cleaner.
  2.  
  3. Disconnect the fuel and vacuum lines. It might be a good idea to tag them to avoid confusion when the time comes to put them back.
  4.  
  5. Disconnect the choke rod.
  6.  
  7. Disconnect the accelerator linkage.
  8.  
  9. Disconnect the automatic transmission linkage.
  10.  
  11. Unbolt and remove the carburetor.
  12.  
  13. Remove the base gasket.
  14.  

To install:
  1. Make sure that the carburetor and manifold sealing surfaces are clean.
  2.  
  3. Install a new carburetor base gasket.
  4.  
  5. Install the carburetor and start the fuel and vacuum lines.
  6.  
  7. Bolt down the carburetor evenly.
  8.  
  9. Tighten the fuel and vacuum lines.
  10.  
  11. Connect the accelerator and automatic transmission linkage. If the transmission linkage was disturbed, it will have to be adjusted. The procedure is in Drive Train .
  12.  
  13. Connect the choke rod.
  14.  
  15. Install the air cleaner. Adjust the Idle Speed and Mixture as described in Tune-up and Performance Maintenance . Depending on the vintage, it may not be necessary (or possible) to adjust the idle mixture.
  16.  

OVERHAUL



Whenever wear or dirt causes a carburetor to perform poorly, there are two possible solutions to the problem. The simplest is to trade on the old unit for a rebuilt one. The other, cheaper alternative is to buy an overhaul kit and rebuild the original kit. Some of the better overhaul kits contain complete step-by-step instructions along with exploded views and gauges. Other kits, intended for the professional, have only a few general overhaul hints. The second type can be moderately confusing to the novice, especially since a kit may have extra parts so that one kit can cover several variations of the same carburetor. In any event, it is not a good idea to dismantle any carburetor without at least replacing all the gaskets. The carburetor adjustments should all be checked during or after overhaul.

Before you go to the parts store for a rebuilding kit, make sure that you know what make and model your carburetor is.

Efficient carburetion depends greatly on careful cleaning and inspection during overhaul, since dirt, gum, water, or varnish in or on the carburetor parts are often responsible for poor performance.

Overhaul your carburetor in a clean, dust free area. Carefully disassemble the carburetor, referring often to the exploded views. Keep all similar and lookalike parts segregated during disassembly and cleaning to avoid accidental interchange during assembly. Make a note of all jet sizes.

When the carburetor is disassembled, wash all parts (except diaphragms, electric choke units, pump plunger, and any other plastic, leather, fire, or rubber parts) in clean carburetor solvent. Do not leave parts in the solvent any longer than is necessary to sufficiently loosen the deposits. Excessive cleaning may remove the special finish from the float bowl and choke valve bodies, leaving these parts unfit for service. Rinse all parts in clean solvent and blow them dry with compressed air or allow them to air dry. Wipe clean all cork, plastic, leather, and fiber parts with a clean, lint-free cloth.

Blow out all passages and jets with compressed air and be sure that there are no restrictions or blockages. Never use wire or similar tools to clean jets, fuel passages, or air bleeds. Clean all jets and valves separately to avoid accidental interchange.

Check all parts for wear or damage. If wear or damage is found, replace the complete assembly.

  1. Check the float hinge pin for wear and the float(s) for dents or distortion. Replace the float if fuel has leaked into it.
  2.  
  3. Check the throttle and choke shaft bores for wear or an out-of-round condition. Damage or wear to the throttle arm, shaft, or shaft bore will require replacement of the throttle body. These parts require a close tolerance of fit; wear may allow air leakage, which could affect starting and idling.
  4.  

Throttle shafts and bushings are not included in overhaul kits. They can be purchased separately.

  1. Inspect the idle mixture adjusting needles for burrs or grooves. Any such condition requires replacement of the needle, since you will not be able to obtain a satisfactory idle.
  2.  
  3. Test the accelerator pump check valves. They should pass air one way but not the other. Test for proper seating by blowing and sucking on the valve. Replace the valve as necessary. If the valve is satisfactory, wash the valve again to remove breath moisture.
  4.  
  5. Check the bowl cover for warped surfaces with a straightedge.
  6.  
  7. Closely inspect the valves and seats for wear and damage, replacing as necessary.
  8.  
  9. After the carburetor is assembled, check the choke valve for freedom of operation.
  10.  

Carburetor overhaul kits are recommended for each overhaul. These kits contain all gaskets and new parts to replace those that deteriorate most rapidly. Failure to replace all parts supplied with the kit (especially gaskets) can result in poor performance later.

Some carburetor manufacturers supply overhaul kits of three basic types: minor repair; major repair; and gasket kits. Basically, they contain the following:

Minor Repair Kits



All gaskets
 
Float needle valve
 
Volume control screw
 
All diaphragms
 
Spring for the pump diaphragm
 

Major Repair Kits


All jets and gaskets
 
All diaphragms
 
Float needle valve
 
Volume control screw
 
Pump ball valve
 
Main jet carrier
 
Float
 
Complete intermediate rod
 
Intermediate pump lever
 
Complete injector tube
 
Some cover hold-down screws and washers
 

Gasket Kits


All gaskets
 

After cleaning and checking all components, reassemble the carburetor, using new parts and referring to the exploded view. When reassembling, make sure that all screws and jets are tight in their seats, but do not overtighten as the tips will be distorted. Tighten all screws gradually, in rotation. Do not tighten needle valves into their seats; uneven jetting will result. Always use new gaskets. BE sure to adjust the float level when reassembling.

 
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