AMC Coupes/Sedans/Wagons 1975-1988 Repair Information

Avoiding the Most Common Mistakes

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Pay attention to the instructions provided. There are 3 common mistakes in mechanical work:

  1. Incorrect order of assembly, disassembly or adjustment. When taking something apart or putting it together, performing steps in the wrong order usually just costs you extra time; however, it CAN break something. Read the entire procedure before beginning disassembly. Perform everything in the order in which the instructions say you should, even if you can't immediately see a reason for it. When you're taking apart something that is very intricate, you might want to draw a picture of how it looks when assembled at one point in order to make sure you get everything back in its proper position. We will supply exploded views whenever possible. When making adjustments, perform them in the proper order; often, one adjustment affects another, and you cannot expect even satisfactory results unless each adjustment is made only when it cannot be changed by any other.
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  3. Overtorquing (or undertorquing). While it is more common for overtorquing to cause damage, undertorquing may allow a fastener to vibrate loose causing serious damage. Especially when dealing with aluminum parts, pay attention to torque specifications and utilize a torque wrench in assembly. If a torque figure is not available, remember that if you are using the right tool to perform the job, you will probably not have to strain yourself to get a fastener tight enough. The pitch of most threads is so slight that the tension you put on the wrench will be multiplied many times in actual force on what you are tightening. A good example of how critical torque is can be seen in the case of spark plug installation, especially where you are putting the plug into an aluminum cylinder head. Too little torque can fail to crush the gasket, causing leakage of combustion gases and consequent overheating of the plug and engine parts. Too much torque can damage the threads or distort the plug, changing the spark gap.
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There are many commercial products available for ensuring that fasteners won't come loose, even if they are not torqued just right (a very common brand is Loctite®). If you're worried about getting something together tight enough to hold, but loose enough to avoid mechanical damage during assembly, one of these products might offer substantial insurance. Before choosing a threadlocking compound, read the label on the package and make sure the product is compatible with the materials, fluids, etc. involved.

  1. Crossthreading. This occurs when a part such as a bolt is screwed into a nut or casting at the wrong angle and forced. Crossthreading is more likely to occur if access is difficult. It helps to clean and lubricate fasteners, then to start threading with the part to be installed positioned straight in. Then, start the bolt, spark plug, etc. with your fingers. If you encounter resistance, unscrew the part and start over again at a different angle until it can be inserted and turned several times without much effort. Keep in mind that many parts, especially spark plugs, have tapered threads, so that gentle turning will automatically bring the part you're threading to the proper angle, but only if you don't force it or resist a change in angle. Don't put a wrench on the part until it's been tightened a couple of turns by hand. If you suddenly encounter resistance, and the part has not seated fully, don't force it. Pull it back out to make sure it's clean and threading properly.
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Always take your time and be patient; once you have some experience, working on your vehicle may well become an enjoyable hobby.

See Figures 1 through 16

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Fig. Fig. 1: All but the most basic procedures will require an assortment of ratchets and sockets



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Fig. Fig. 2: In addition to ratchets, a good set of wrenches and hex keys will be necessary



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Fig. Fig. 3: A hydraulic floor jack and a set of jackstands are essential for lifting and supporting the vehicle



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Fig. Fig. 4: An assortment of pliers, grippers and cutters will be handy for old rusted parts and stripped bolt heads



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Fig. Fig. 5: Various drivers, chisels and prybars are great tools to have in your toolbox



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Fig. Fig. 6: Many repairs will require the use of a torque wrench to assure the components are properly fastened



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Fig. Fig. 7: Tools from specialty manufacturers such as Lisle® are designed to make your job easier ...



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Fig. Fig. 8: ... these Torx® drivers and magnetic socket holders are just 2 examples of their handy products



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Fig. Fig. 9: Although not always necessary, using specialized brake tools will save time



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Fig. Fig. 10: A few inexpensive lubrication tools will make maintenance easier



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Fig. Fig. 11: Various pullers, clamps and separator tools are needed for many larger, more complicated repairs



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Fig. Fig. 12: A variety of tools and gauges should be used for spark plug gapping and installation



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Fig. Fig. 13: Dwell/tachometer unit (typical)



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Fig. Fig. 14: Inductive type timing light



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Fig. Fig. 15: Compression gauge and a combination vacuum/fuel pressure test gauge



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Fig. Fig. 16: Proper information is vital

 
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