Avenger, Sebring Coupe, Stratus Coupe, 1999-2006

Transmission Range Sensor/Solenoid Assembly

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Description & Operation



Not for Dodge Stratus Sedan

The Transmission Range Sensor (TRS) is mounted to the top of the valve body inside the transaxle and can only be serviced by removing the valve body. The electrical connector extends through the transaxle case. The Transmission Range Sensor (TRS) has four switch contacts that monitor shift lever position and send the information to the TCM. The TRS also has an integrated temperature sensor (thermistor) that communicates transaxle temperature to the TCM and PCM.

Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig.

Not for Dodge Stratus Sedan

The Transmission Range Sensor (TRS) communicates shift lever position to the TCM as a combination of open and closed switches. Each shift lever position has an assigned combination of switch states (open/closed) that the TCM receives from four sense circuits. The TCM interprets this information and determines the appropriate transaxle gear position and shift schedule.

Since there are four switches, there are 16 possible combinations of open and closed switches (codes). Seven of these codes are related to gear position and three are recognized as between gear codes. This results in six codes, which should never occur. These are called invalid codes. An invalid code will result in a DTC, and the TCM will then determine the shift lever position based on pressure switch data. This allows reasonably normal transmission operation with a TRS failure.

The Transmission Range Sensor (TRS) is mounted to the top of the valve body inside the transaxle and can only be serviced by removing the valve body. The electrical connector extends through the transaxle case. The Transmission Range Sensor (TRS) has four switch contacts that monitor shift lever position and send the information to the TCM. The TRS also has an integrated temperature sensor (thermistor) that communicates transaxle temperature to the TCM and PCM.

Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig.

The Transmission Range Sensor (TRS) communicates shift lever position to the TCM as a combination of open and closed switches. Each shift lever position has an assigned combination of switch states (open/closed) that the TCM receives from four sense circuits. The TCM interprets this information and determines the appropriate transaxle gear position and shift schedule.

Since there are four switches, there are 16 possible combinations of open and closed switches (codes). Seven of these codes are related to gear position and three are recognized as between gear codes. This results in six codes, which should never occur. These are called invalid codes. An invalid code will result in a DTC, and the TCM will then determine the shift lever position based on pressure switch data. This allows reasonably normal transmission operation with a TRS failure.

Calculated Temperature

A failure in the temperature sensor or circuit will result in calculated temperature being substituted for actual temperature. Calculated temperature is a predicted fluid temperature, which is calculated from a combination of inputs:



Battery (ambient) temperature
 
Engine coolant temperature
 
In-gear run time since start-up
 

A failure in the temperature sensor or circuit will result in calculated temperature being substituted for actual temperature. Calculated temperature is a predicted fluid temperature, which is calculated from a combination of inputs:



Battery (ambient) temperature
 
Engine coolant temperature
 
In-gear run time since start-up
 

Transmission Temperature Sensor

The TRS has an integrated thermistor that the TCM uses to monitor the transmissions sump temperature. Since fluid temperature can affect transmission shift quality and converter lock up, the TCM requires this information to determine which shift schedule to operate in. The PCM also monitors this temperature data so it can energize the vehicle cooling fan(s) when a transmission overheat condition exists. If the thermistor circuit fails, the TCM will revert to calculated oil temperature usage.

Selector Lever PositionT42T41T3T1
ParkClosedClosedClosedOpen
ReverseClosedOpenOpenOpen
NeutralClosedClosedOpenClosed
OverdriveOpenOpenOpenClosed
ThirdOpenOpenClosedOpen
LowClosedOpenClosedClosed

The TRS has an integrated thermistor that the TCM uses to monitor the transmissions sump temperature. Since fluid temperature can affect transmission shift quality and converter lock up, the TCM requires this information to determine which shift schedule to operate in. The PCM also monitors this temperature data so it can energize the vehicle cooling fan(s) when a transmission overheat condition exists. If the thermistor circuit fails, the TCM will revert to calculated oil temperature usage.

Selector Lever PositionT42T41T3T1
ParkClosedClosedClosedOpen
ReverseClosedOpenOpenOpen
NeutralClosedClosedOpenClosed
OverdriveOpenOpenOpenClosed
ThirdOpenOpenClosedOpen
LowClosedOpenClosedClosed

Removal & Installation



  1. Remove valve body assembly from transaxle.
  2.  
  3. Remove transmission range sensor retaining screw and remove sensor from valve body.
  4.  
  5. Remove TRS from manual shaft.
  6.  

To Install:

  1. Install transmission range sensor to the valve body and torque retaining screw to 5 Nm (45 inch lbs.).
  2.  
  3. Install valve body to transaxle.

    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig.

  4.  

  1. Remove valve body assembly from transaxle.
  2.  
  3. Remove transmission range sensor retaining screw and remove sensor from valve body.
  4.  
  5. Remove TRS from manual shaft.
  6.  

To Install:

  1. Install transmission range sensor to the valve body and torque retaining screw to 5 Nm (45 inch lbs.).
  2.  
  3. Install valve body to transaxle.

    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig.

  4.  

 
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