Chevrolet Blazer/Jimmy 1969-1982 Repair Guide

Tie Rod Ends

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A common cause of excessive steering play on these trucks is the steering gear box coming loose from the frame. The torque for these bolts is 65 ft. lbs.

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION





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Fig. Fig. 1 Exploded view of a common 4WD steering linkage



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Fig. Fig. 2 To remove the tie-rod, first use pliers to remove the cotter pin ...



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Fig. Fig. 3 ... then remove castellated nut



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Fig. Fig. 4 Use a ball joint puller to loosen the stud ...



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Fig. Fig. 5 ... then remove the ball joint from the steering knuckle



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Fig. Fig. 6 Matchmark the position of adjuster sleeve in relation to the threads ...



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Fig. Fig. 7 ... then loosen the adjuster sleeve bolts and unscrew the tie-rod end

  1. Raise the front of the truck and support it safely on jack stands.
  2.  
  3. Remove the tie rod end stud cotter pin and nut.
  4.  
  5. You can use a tie rod end ball joint removal tool to loosen the stud, or you can loosen it by tapping on the steering arm with a hammer while using a heavy hammer as a backup.
  6.  
  7. Remove the inner stud in the same way.
  8.  
  9. Loosen the tie rod adjuster sleeve clamp nuts.
  10.  
  11. Unscrew the tie rod end from the threaded sleeve. The threads may be left or right-hand threads. Count the number of turns required to remove it.
  12.  

To install:

  1. Grease the threads and turn the new tie rod end in as many turns as were needed to remove it. This will give approximately correct toe-in. Tighten the clamp bolts.
  2.  
  3. Tighten the stud nuts to 45 ft. lbs. and install new cotter pins. You may tighten the nut to align the cotter pin, but don't loosen it.
  4.  

 
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