Chrysler Caravan/Voyager/Town and Country 1996-1999

Brake Disc (Rotor)

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REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1, 2 and 3



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Fig. Fig. 1: Support the caliper with wire as shown to prevent damage to the flexible hose



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Fig. Fig. 2: The rotor is held in place by spring clips

  1. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  2.  
  3. Remove the wheel.
  4.  
  5. Remove the caliper and brake pads. Do not disconnect the brake hose from the caliper. Support the caliper from the strut using a strong piece of wire; do not let the caliper hang from the brake hose.
  6.  
  7. Remove the factory installed clips, if equipped, from the wheel studs. It is not necessary to reinstall these clips.
  8.  
  9. Chalk an index mark on the brake rotor before removal to show its exact installation on the hub. Remove the rotor from the hub. Be sure to clean the mating surface between the hub and the rotor of any dirt, grease or debris before installing the rotor.
  10.  



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Fig. Fig. 3: Once the caliper is removed, the rotor can be taken off the hub

To install:
  1. Install the rotor on the hub.
  2.  
  3. Install the caliper and brake pads.
  4.  
  5. Install the wheel and lug nuts. Torque the lug nuts, in a star pattern sequence, to 95 ft. lbs. (129 Nm).
  6.  
  7. Lower the vehicle and depress the brake pedal several times to position the caliper piston. Road test the vehicle.
  8.  

INSPECTION



See Figures 4, 5, 6 and 7

Whenever the brake calipers or pads are removed, inspect the rotors for defects. The brake rotor is an extremely important component of the brake system. Cracks, large scratches or warpage can adversely affect the braking system, at times to the point of becoming very dangerous.

Light scoring is acceptable. Heavy scoring or warping will necessitate refinishing or replacement of the disc. The brake disc must be replaced if cracks or burned marks are evident.



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Fig. Fig. 4: Check the rotor thickness using a micrometer



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Fig. Fig. 5: The minimum thickness measurement is cast into the rotor



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Fig. Fig. 6: Check the rotor run-out using a dial indicator

Check the thickness of the disc using a micrometer. Measure the thickness at 12 equally spaced points 1 in. (25mm) from the edge of the disc. If thickness varies more than 0.0005 in. (0.013mm), the disc should be refinished, provided equal amounts are cut from each side and the thickness does not fall below 0.843 in. (21.4mm). Be sure to remove as little as necessary from each rotor side.

Check the run-out (warpage) of the disc using a dial indicator. Total run-out of the disc installed on the car should not exceed 0.005 in. (0.013mm). The disc can be resurfaced to correct minor variations, as long as equal amounts are cut from each side and the thickness is at least 0.882 inch (22.4mm) on the front rotors, or 0.443 in. (11.25mm) on the rear rotors, after resurfacing.



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Fig. Fig. 7: Check the wheel hub run-out using a dial indicator

Check the run-out of the hub (disc removed). It should not be more than 0.0012 inch (0.030mm). If so, the hub should be replaced.

All rotors have markings for MINIMUM allowable thickness cast on an unmachined surface or an alternate surface. Always use this specification as the minimum allowable thickness or refinishing limit. Refer to a local auto parts store or machine shop, if necessary, where rotors are resurfaced.

If the rotor needs to be replaced with a new part, the protective coating on the braking surface of the rotor must be removed with an appropriate solvent before installing the rotor to the vehicle.

 
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