Chrysler Full-Size Vans 1989-1998 Repair Guide

Brake Disc (Rotor)

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REMOVAL & INSTALLATION




CAUTION
Older brake pads or shoes may contain asbestos, which has been determined to be cancer causing agent. Never clean the brake surfaces with compressed air! Avoid inhaling any dust from any brake surface! When cleaning brake surfaces, use a commercially available brake cleaning fluid.

See Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12

  1. Raise and safely support the vehicle securely on jackstands.
  2.  
  3. Remove the wheels.
  4.  
  5. Remove the caliper assembly and support it using a piece of mechanic's wire attached to the frame.
  6.  

Do not disconnect the brake fluid hose or allow the caliper to hang by the hose.

  1. Remove the grease cap from the hub.
  2.  
  3. Remove the cotter pin, nut lock, adjusting nut and flat washer from the spindle.
  4.  
  5. Tilt the rotor slightly to remove the outer bearing assembly from the hub.
  6.  
  7. Pull the hub and disc assembly off the wheel spindle.
  8.  
  9. Remove and discard the old grease seal at the rear of the rotor.
  10.  
  11. Remove the inner bearing cone and roller assembly from the hub.
  12.  

To install:
  1. Clean all grease from the inner and outer bearing cups with solvent. Inspect the bearing races for pits, scratches, or excessive wear. If the races are damaged, remove them with a drift.
  2.  
  3. Clean the inner and outer cone and roller assemblies with solvent and dry them. If the cone and roller assemblies show excessive wear or damage, replace them as an assembly with new bearing races.
  4.  

Do not dry the bearings with compressed air. Spinning the bearing without lubrication may cause damage.

  1. Clean the spindle and the inside of the hub with solvent to thoroughly remove all old grease.
  2.  
  3. If the inner and/or outer bearing cups were removed, install the replacement cups on the hub. Be sure that the cups seat properly in the hub.
  4.  

It is imperative that all old grease be removed from the bearings and surrounding surfaces before repacking. The newer EP High Temperature Grease is not compatible with the sodium base grease used in the past.

  1. Use a bearing packer, if available, to pack the new bearings with grease. If not, work the grease in between the rollers and the outer and inner races of the bearing, using the palm of your hand. Work from the larger diameter of the bearing. Make sure the grease goes through the width of the bearing to the small diameter. Pack and install the inner bearing first.
  2.  
  3. Install the inner bearing grease seal with an appropriate driver.
  4.  
  5. Install the hub and disc on the wheel spindle. To prevent damage to the grease retainer and spindle threads, keep the hub centered on the spindle.
  6.  
  7. Install the outer bearing cone and roller assembly and the flat washer on the spindle. Install the adjusting nut.
  8.  
  9. Adjust the wheel bearings. Rotate the wheel, hub and rotor assembly while tightening the adjusting nut to 240-300 inch lbs. (27-34 Nm) in order to seat the bearings. Back off the adjusting nut 1 / 4 turn (90°), then finger-tighten the adjusting nut.
  10.  
  11. Locate the nut lock on the adjusting nut so that the castellations on the lock are lined up with the cotter pin hole in the spindle. Install the new cotter pin, bending the ends of the cotter pin around the castellated flange of the nut lock.
  12.  

Bend the ends of the cotter pin around the castellations of the locknut to prevent interference.

  1. Check the wheel for proper rotation, then install the grease cap.
  2.  
  3. Install the wheels.
  4.  

Failure to tighten the lug nuts to the proper torque in a star pattern may result in damage to the brake rotor.

  1. Lower the vehicle.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 1: Pry off the dust cap to access the rotor retaining hardware



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Fig. Fig. 2: Use needlenose pliers to remove the cotter pin



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Fig. Fig. 3: Remove the nut lock



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Fig. Fig. 4: Use a suitable tool to loosen the retaining nut



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Fig. Fig. 5: After the nut is removed, place it and the washer in a safe place



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Fig. Fig. 6: Remove the outer bearing and set it aside for a later inspection



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Fig. Fig. 7: Remove the rotor from the spindle with care; be ready for the sudden weight when the rotor is no longer supported



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Fig. Fig. 8: The wheel bearing grease seal, as installed on the rotor



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Fig. Fig. 9: Use a suitable tool, such as this seal remover from Lisle®, to remove the grease seal from the rotor



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Fig. Fig. 10: Inspect the bearing rollers for wear



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Fig. Fig. 11: This bearing is an example of one that wasn't properly maintained; notice the sludge build-up from the old grease



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Fig. Fig. 12: Always tighten the retaining nut to specifications after installing the rotor, to ensure proper wheel bearing adjustment

INSPECTION



Using a brake rotor micrometer or Vernier caliper measure the rotor thickness in several places around the rotor.

Mount a magnetic base dial indicator to the strut member and zero the indicator stylus on the face of the rotor. Rotate the rotor 360 degrees by hand and record the run-out.

Compare measurements to the brake specifications chart. If the thickness and run-out do not meet specifications, replace the rotor.

Rotor minimum thickness is cast or stamped into each rotor. If the value on the rotor disagrees with the values stated here, use the value on the rotor.

 
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