Continental 2000-2002

Fuses, Fusible Links & Circuit Breakers

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All vehicles are equipped with a fuse panel located on the left side of the lower instrument panel. In addition, 1992-98 vehicles are equipped with a combination fuse/relay panel called the "engine compartment fuse box" which is located in the vicinity of the battery in the engine compartment.



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Fig. This fuse panel will actually fold down to give you easier access to the fuses and flashers



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Fig. The cover for the engine compartment fuse box is easily removable. The engine compartment fuse box, with its fuses and relays, takes the place of the bundle of fusible links



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Fig. The inside of the lid gives you the explanation of the fuse locations



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Fig. This gives you the view of all the Maxi Fuse® locations in the box. It is easy to see if any fuses are "blown" with a bright light

Fuse links are used to protect the main wiring harness and selected branches from complete burn-out, should a short circuit or electrical overload occur. A fuse link is a short length of insulated wire, integral with the engine compartment wiring harness. It is several wire gauges smaller than the circuit it protects and generally located in-line directly from the positive terminal of the battery.

Production fuse links are color coded as follows:



Gray: 12 gauge
 
Dark Green: 14 gauge
 
Black: 16 gauge
 
Brown: 18 gauge
 
Dark Blue: 20 gauge
 

When a heavy current flows, such as when a booster battery is connected incorrectly or when a short to ground occurs in the wiring harness, the fuse link burns out and protects the alternator or wiring.

A burned out fuse link may have bare wire ends protruding from the insulation, or it may have only expanded or bubbled insulation with illegible identification. When it is hard to determine if the fuse link is burned out, perform the continuity test:

  1. Make sure the battery is okay, then turn on the headlights or an accessory. If the headlights or accessory do not work, the fuse link is probably burned out.
  2.  
  3. If equipped with more than one fuse link, use the same procedure as in Step 1 to test each link separately.
  4.  
  5. To test the fuse link that protects the alternator, make sure the battery is okay, then check with a voltmeter for voltage at the BAT terminal of the alternator. No voltage indicates that the fuse link is probably burned out.
  6.  

Circuit breakers are located inside the fuse panel. They are automatically reset when the problem corrects itself, is repaired, or the circuit cools down to allow operation again.

Fuses



Replacement
  1. Locate the fuse panel and remove the cover, if necessary.
  2.  
  3. Look through the clear side of the fuse in question, to see if the metal wire inside is separated. If the wire is separated, the fuse is blown and must be replaced.
  4.  
  5. Remove the fuse by pulling it from its cavity; no special tools are required.
  6.  
  7. Replace the blown fuse only with one having the same amp rating for that particular circuit. Push the fuse straight in until the fuse seats fully in the cavity.
  8.  

Fusible (Fuse) Links



Replacement

When replacing a fuse link, always make sure the replacement fuse link is a duplicate of the one removed with respect to gauge, length and insulation. Original equipment and original equipment specification replacement fuse links have insulation that is flame proof. Do not fabricate a fuse link from ordinary wire because the insulation may not be flame proof.

If a circuit protected by a fuse link becomes inoperative, inspect for a blown fuse link. If the fuse link wire insulation is burned or opened, disconnect the feed as close as possible behind the splice in the harness. If the damaged fuse link is between 2 splices (weld points in the harness), cut out the damaged portion as close as possible to the weld points.

Replace the fuse link as follows:

  1. To service a 2-link group when only one link has blown and the other link is not damaged, proceed as follows:
    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
    2.  
    3. Cut out the blown fusible link (2 places).
    4.  
    5. Position the correct eyelet type service fusible link with the bare end to the correct size wire connector and crimp to the wire ends.
    6.  
    7. Heat the splice insulation until the tubing shrinks and adhesive flows from each end of the connector.
    8.  
    9. Connect the negative battery cable.
    10.  

  2.  
  3. To service a fuse link in a multi-feed or single circuit, proceed as follows:
    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
    2.  
    3. Determine which circuit is damaged, its location and the cause of the open fuse link. If the damaged fuse link is one of 3 fed by a common number 10 or 12 gauge feed wire, determine the specific affected circuit.
    4.  
    5. Cut the damaged fuse link from the wiring harness and discard. If the fuse link is one of 3 circuits fed by a single feed wire, cut it out of the harness at each splice end and discard.
    6.  
    7. Obtain the proper fuse link and butt connectors for attaching the fuse link to the harness.
    8.  
    9. Strip 5 / 16 in. (7.6mm) of insulation from the wire ends and insert into the proper size wire connector. Crimp and heat the splice insulation until the tubing shrinks and adhesive flows from each end of the connector.
    10.  
    11. To replace a fuse link on a single circuit in a harness, cut out the damaged portion. Strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (12.7mm) of insulation from the 2 wire ends and attach the correct size fuse link to each wire end with the proper gauge wire connectors. Crimp and heat the splice insulation until the tubing shrinks and adhesive flows from each end of the connector.
    12.  
    13. Connect the negative battery cable.
    14.  

  4.  
  5. To service a fuse link with an eyelet terminal on one end, such as the charging circuit, proceed as follows:
    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
    2.  
    3. Cut off the fuse link behind the weld, strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (12.7mm) of insulation from the cut end, and attach the appropriate new eyelet fuse link to the cut stripped wire with the proper size connector.
    4.  
    5. Crimp and heat the splice insulation until the tubing shrinks and adhesive flows from each end of the connector.
    6.  
    7. Connect the negative battery cable.
    8.  

  6.  


NOTE
Do not mistake a resistor wire for a fuse link. The resistor wire is generally longer and has print stating "Resistor-do not cut or splice. "When attaching a No. 16, 18 or 20 gauge fuse link to a heavy gauge wire, always double the stripped wire end of the fuse link before inserting and crimping it into the wire connector for positive wire retention.



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Fig. General fusible link repair procedures



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Fig. Functional schematic showing fuse link locations



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Fig. Fusible link replacement in a 2-link group when only one link has blown



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Fig. Fusible link replacement in a single circuit



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Fig. Fusible link repair using the eyelet terminal fuse link of the specified gauge for attachment to a circuit wire end

 
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