Dodge Omni/Horizon/Rampage 1978-1989 Repair Guide

Brake Drums

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REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



  1. Raise the car and support it safely.
  2.  
  3. Remove the plug from the brake shoe adjusting hole.
  4.  
  5. Using a brake spoon, release the brake shoes by moving the star wheel adjuster up (left side) or down (right side).
  6.  
  7. Remove the grease cap.
  8.  



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Fig. Fig. 1 Use the access slot at the rear of the drum to loosen the brake adjuster



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Fig. Fig. 2 Loosen and remove the grease cap.

  1. Remove the cotter pin. Never reuse the old cotter pin.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 3 With pliers, remove the cotter pin, then throw it away. Never reuse a cotter pin

  1. Remove the nut lock.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 4 With the cotter pin withdrawn, remove the castellated nut lock

  1. Loosen the nut, then remove the nut and washer.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 5 With a wrench, loosen the bearing adjusting nut

  1. Remove the locknut and washer.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 6 With the nut removed you can access the washer



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Fig. Fig. 7 Take the washer off the axle stub

  1. Remove the brake drum and bearings.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 8 The bearing should come right out



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Fig. Fig. 9 Remove the drum from the spindle

To install:

  1. Reposition the drum and install the bearings.
  2.  
  3. Adjust the wheel bearings.
  4.  
  5. Install the cotter pin, locknut and washer.
  6.  
  7. Install the grease cap.
  8.  
  9. Adjust the brakes.
  10.  
  11. Replug the adjusting hole.
  12.  
  13. Lower the car.
  14.  

INSPECTION



Measure the drum run-out and diameter. If not according to specifications the drum should be replaced. The variation in diameter should not exceed 0.002 in. (0.06mm) in 30° or 0.003 in. (0.09mm) in 360°. All drums show markings of maximum diameter.

Once the drum is off, clean the shoes and springs with a stiff brush to remove the accumulated brake dust.



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Fig. Fig. 10 Improperly worn linings are cause for concern only if braking is unstable and noise is objectionable. Compare the lining and drum wear pattern, the drum being more important, since the drum shapes the wear of the shoe


CAUTION
Avoid prolonged exposure to brake dust. The dust may contain asbestos which has been determined to cause cancer.

Grease on the shoes can be removed with alcohol or fine sandpaper.

After cleaning, examine the brake shoes for glazed, oily, loose, cracked or improperly worn linings. Light glazing is common and can be removed with fine sandpaper. Linings that are worn improperly or below 1 / 16 in. (2mm) above rivet heads or brake shoe should be replaced. The NHTSA advises states with inspection programs to fail vehicles with brake linings less than 1 / 32 in. (1mm). A good ""eyeball" test is to replace the linings when the thickness is the same as or less than the thickness of the metal backing plate (shoe).



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Fig. Fig. 11 Linings that are worn improperly or below 1 / 16 in. (2mm) above rivet heads or brake shoe should be replaced



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Fig. Fig. 12 A blued or severely heat cracked drum and blued or heavily glazed linings are the result of overheating

Wheel cylinders are a vital part of the brake system and should be inspected carefully. Gently pull back the rubber boots; if any fluid is visible, it's time to replace or rebuild the wheel cylinders. Boots that are distorted, cracked or otherwise damaged, also point to the need for service. Check the flexible brake lines for cracks, chafing or wear.

Check the brake shoe retracting and hold-down springs; they should not be worn or distorted. Be sure that the adjuster mechanism moves freely. The points on the backing plate where the shoes slide should be shiny and free of rust. Rust in these areas suggests that the brake shoes are not moving properly.



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Fig. Fig. 13 Check for wear or distortion on the retracting and hold-down springs

 
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