Forenza 2007

Electronic Control Module

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Operation



Specific to:

Suzuki Forenza 2007-2008

Suzuki Reno 2007-2008

The Engine Control Module (ECM), is the control center of the fuel injection system. It constantly looks at the information from various sensors and controls the systems that affect the vehicle-s performance. The ECM also performs the diagnostic functions of the system. It can recognize operational problems, alert the driver through the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) and store diagnostic trouble code(s) which identify problem areas to aid the technician in making repairs. There are no serviceable parts in the ECM. The calibrations are stored in the ECM in the Programmable Read-Only Memory (PROM). The ECM controls output circuits such as the fuel injectors, the idle air control motor, the A/C clutch relay, etc., by controlling the ground circuit through transistors or a device called a -quad-driver.-

Removal & Installation



Specific to:

Suzuki Forenza 2007-2008

Suzuki Reno 2007-2008


NOTE
If the Engine Control Module (ECM) is replaced with new one (VIN data is still not registered) or if an ECM is from a used vehicle (VIN data of other vehicle has been registered previously), make sure to re-register the VIN in the ECM by performing the VIN Registration so that VIN can be read by a scan tool.

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. Remove the air intake tube and resonator.
  4.  
  5. Disconnect the ECM connectors from the ECM.
  6.  
  7. Remove the engine control module.
  8.  

To install:

  1. Connect the ECM connectors to the ECM.
  2.  
  3. Align the ECM into the mounting base.
  4.  
  5. Snap the ECM into its mounting base.
  6.  
  7. Install the ECM trim locks.
  8.  
  9. Install the air intake tube and resonator.
  10.  
  11. Connect the negative battery cable.
  12.  
  13. Perform a crankshaft position system variation learning procedure.
  14.  

Testing



Specific to:

Suzuki Forenza 2007-2008

Suzuki Reno 2007-2008

The Engine Control Module (ECM) supplies either 5 or 12 Volts to power the sensors or switches. This is done through resistances in the ECM which are so high in value that a test light will not come on when connected to the circuit. In some cases, even an ordinary shop voltmeter will not give an accurate reading because its resistance is too low. You must use a digital voltmeter with a 10 milliohm input impedance to get accurate voltage readings.

 
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