GM Blazer/Jimmy/Typhoon/Bravada 1983-1993 Repair Guide

Engine

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OIL LEVEL CHECK



See Figures 1, 2 and 3

Every time you stop for fuel, check the engine oil making sure the engine has fully warmed and the vehicle is parked on a level surface. If the truck is used for trailer towing or for heavy-duty use, it is recommended that you check the oil more frequently. Because it takes a some time for all the oil to drain back to the oil pan, you should wait a few minutes before checking your oil. If you are doing this at a fuel stop, first fill the fuel tank, then open the hood and check the oil, but don't get so carried away as to forget to pay for the fuel. Most station attendants won't believe that you forgot.

  1. Make sure the truck is parked on level ground.
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  3. When checking the oil level it is best for the engine to be at normal operating temperature, although checking the oil immediately after stopping will lead to a false reading. Wait a few minutes after turning off the engine to allow the oil to drain back into the crankcase.
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  5. Open the hood and locate the dipstick which will be in a guide tube mounted in the upper engine block, just below the cylinder head mating surface. The dipstick may be located on the right or left side of the vehicle depending upon your particular engine, but on most of these trucks, it will be toward the driver's side of the engine. Pull the dipstick from its tube, wipe it clean (using a clean, lint free rag) and then reinsert it.
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  7. Pull the dipstick out again and, holding it horizontally, read the oil level. The oil should be between the FULL and ADD marks on the dipstick. If the oil is below the ADD mark, add oil of the proper viscosity through the capped opening in the top of the cylinder head cover or filler tube, as applicable. See the oil and fuel recommendations listed earlier in this section for the proper viscosity and rating of oil to use.
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  9. Replace the dipstick and check the oil level again after adding any oil. Approximately one quart of oil will raise the level from the ADD mark to the FULL mark. Be sure not to overfill the crankcase and waste the oil. Excess oil will generally be consumed at an accelerated rate.
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Fig. Fig. 1: Withdraw the oil dipstick and wipe it clean with a lint free cloth



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Fig. Fig. 2: Fully reinsert the oil dipstick into the guide tube



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Fig. Fig. 3: Withdraw the dipstick again and read the oil level while holding the stick horizontally

OIL AND FILTER CHANGE



See Figures 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9

If the vehicle is operated on a daily or semi-daily basis and most trips are for several miles (allowing the engine to properly warm-up), the oil should be changed a minimum of every 12 months or 7,500 miles (Diesel interval is 5,000 miles), whichever comes first.

If however, the vehicle is used to tow a trailer, is made to idle for extended periods of time such as in heavy daily traffic or if used as a service vehicle (delivery), or if the vehicle is used for only short trips in below freezing temperature, the oil change interval should be shortened. Likewise, if your vehicle is used under dusty, polluted or off-road conditions, the oil should be changed more frequently. Under these circumstances oil has a greater chance of building up sludge and contaminants which could damage your engine. If your vehicle use fits these circumstances, as most do, it is suggested that the oil and filter be changed every 3,000 miles or 3 months, whichever comes first.

Under certain circumstances, General Motors recommends changing both the oil and filter during the first oil change and then only replacing the filter every other oil change thereafter. For the small price of an oil filter, it's cheap insurance to replace the filter at every oil change. One of the larger filter manufacturers points out in its advertisements that not changing the filter leaves as much as one quart of dirty oil in the engine. This claim is true and should be kept in mind when changing your oil.

The oil filter on the diesel engine must be changed every oil change.

Oil should always be changed after the engine has been running long enough to bring it up to normal operating temperature. Hot oil will flow easier and more contaminants will be removed along with the oil than if it were drained cold. The oil drain plug is located on the bottom of the oil pan (bottom of the engine). The oil filter is usually located on the left side of the engine and in some cases may be easier to reach through the plastic access flap in the wheel well.

You should have available a container that will hold a minimum of 8 quarts of liquid (to help prevent spilling the oil even after it is drained), a wrench to fit the drain plug, a spout for pouring in new oil and a rag or two, which you will always need. If the filter is being replaced, you will also need a band wrench or a filter wrench that fits the end of the filter.

If the engine is equipped with an oil cooler, this will also have to be emptied, using the drain plug. Be sure to add enough oil to fill the cooler in addition to the engine.

  1. Run the engine until it reaches normal operating temperature, then shut the engine OFF , make sure the parking brake is firmly set and block the drive wheels.
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  3. Clearance may be sufficient to access the drain plug without raising the vehicle. If the truck must be lifted, be sure to support it safely with jackstands and be sure to position the drain plug at a low point under the vehicle.
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  5. Slide a drain pan of a least 8 quarts capacity under the oil pan. Wipe the drain plug and surrounding area clean using an old rag.
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CAUTION
The EPA warns that prolonged contact with used engine oil may cause a number of skin disorders, including cancer! You should make every effort to minimize your exposure to used engine oil. Protective gloves should be worn when changing the oil. Wash your hands and any other exposed skin areas as soon as possible after exposure to used engine oil. Soap and water, or waterless hand cleaner should be used.



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Fig. Fig. 4: Oil drain plug removal



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Fig. Fig. 5: Drain the old engine oil from the pan by removing the drain plug



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Fig. Fig. 6: Oil filter removal and installation may be accomplished through the wheel well on some vehicles



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Fig. Fig. 7: Before installing a new oil filter, coat the rubber gasket with clean oil



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Fig. Fig. 8: Remove the oil filler cap from the valve cover or filler spout



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Fig. Fig. 9: Using a funnel will help prevent unnecessary mess while refilling the crankcase with fresh oil

  1. Loosen the drain plug using a ratchet, short extension and socket or a box-wrench. Turn the plug out by hand, using a rag to shield your fingers from the hot oil. By keeping an inward pressure on the plug as you unscrew it, oil won't escape past the threads and you can remove it without being burned by hot oil.
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  3. Quickly withdraw the plug and move your hands out of the way, but be careful not to drop the plug into the drain pan as fishing it out can be an unpleasant mess. Allow the oil to drain completely in the pan, then install and carefully tighten the drain plug. Be careful not to overtighten the drain plug, otherwise you'll be buying a new pan or a trick replacement plug for stripped threads.
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Although some manufacturers have at times recommended changing the oil filter every other oil change, we recommend the filter be changed each time you change your oil. The added benefit of clean oil is quickly lost if the old filter is clogged and the added protection to the heart of your engine far outweighs the few dollars saved by using a old filter.

  1. Move the drain pan under the oil filter. Use a strap-type or cap-type filter wrench to loosen the oil filter. Cover your hand with a rag and spin the filter off by hand; turn it slowly. Keep in mind that it's holding about one quart of dirty, hot oil.
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CAUTION
On many General Motors engines, especially the V8s, the oil filter is next to the exhaust pipes. Stay clear of these, since even a passing contact can result in a painful burn. ALSO, on trucks equipped with catalytic converters, stay clear of the converter. The outside temperature of a hot catalytic converter can approach 190°F (849°C).

  1. Empty the old filter into the drain pan and properly dispose of the filter.
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  3. Using a clean rag, wipe off the filter adapter on the engine block. Be sure that the rag doesn't leave any lint which could clog an oil passage.
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  5. Coat the rubber gasket on the filter with fresh oil, then spin it onto the engine by hand; when the gasket touches the adapter surface, give it another 1 / 2 -1 turn. No more, or you'll squash the gasket and it may leak.
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  7. Refill the engine with the correct amount of fresh oil. Please refer to the Capacities chart in this section.
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  9. Check the oil level on the dipstick. It is normal for the level to be a bit above the full mark until the engine is run and the new filter is filled with oil. Start the engine and allow it to idle for a few minutes.
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CAUTION
Do not run the engine above idle speed until it has built up oil pressure, as indicated when the oil light goes out.

  1. Shut off the engine and allow the oil to flow back to the crankcase for a minute, then recheck the oil level. Check around the filter and drain plug for any leaks, and correct as necessary.
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When you have finished this job, you will notice that you now possess four or five quarts of dirty oil. The best thing to do with it is to pour it into plastic jugs, such as milk or old antifreeze containers. Then, locate a service station or automotive parts store where you can pour it into their used oil tank for recycling.


CAUTION
Improperly disposing of used motor oil not only pollutes the environment, it violates Federal law. Dispose of waste oil properly.