GM Camaro/Firebird 1993-1998 Repair Guide

Brake Caliper

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REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 through 11


CAUTION
Older brake pads or shoes may contain asbestos, which has been determined to be a cancer causing agent. Never clean the brake surfaces with compressed air! Avoid inhaling any dust from any brake surface! When cleaning brake surfaces, use a commercially available brake cleaning fluid.

  1. Remove the cap, then siphon 2 / 3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir. Install the reservoir cap.
  2.  
  3. Break the lug nuts loose, then raise and safely support the vehicle.
  4.  
  5. Remove the wheel and tire assembly. Reinstall the lug nuts to retain the rotor.
  6.  
  7. Place a C-clamp across the caliper, positioned on the brake pads. Tighten it until the caliper piston bottoms out in its bore. Do not overtighten the C-clamp, as this may damage the outboard pad.
  8.  

If you haven-t removed some brake fluid from the master cylinder, it may overflow when the piston is retracted.



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Fig. Fig. 1: Bottom the caliper piston out in its bore using a C-clamp-1993-97 vehicles shown



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Fig. Fig. 2: Do not overtighten the C-clamp, as this may distort the outboard brake pad-1998 vehicle shown

  1. Remove the C-clamp.
  2.  
  3. If removing the caliper for replacement or overhaul, remove the bolt holding the brake hose to the caliper. Remove the brake hose fitting and copper gaskets. Discard the gaskets. Plug the brake hose and opening in the caliper housing to prevent debris from entering and contaminating the brake system.
  4.  



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Fig. Fig. 3: If you are replacing or overhauling the caliper, unfasten the brake line fitting ...



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Fig. Fig. 4: ... then remove the brake hose (1) with the fitting (2) and copper gaskets (3) from the back of the caliper housing



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Fig. Fig. 5: Exploded view of the brake hose attachment

  1. If the caliper is not being removed for replacement or overhaul, suspend it from the body using a suitable piece of wire. Do NOT allow the caliper to hang by the brake hose.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 6: If the caliper is not being removed from the vehicle, suspend it from the body with a piece of wire. Do NOT let the caliper hang by the brake hose

  1. Remove the caliper mounting bolts with the sleeves, then remove the caliper from the rotor. Inspect the mounting bolts and sleeves for corrosion and replace them if necessary.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 7: Unfasten the caliper mounting bolts ...



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Fig. Fig. 8: ... then lift the caliper up, off the rotor



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Fig. Fig. 9: Caliper mounting bolt and brake hose attachments-1993-97 vehicles



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Fig. Fig. 10: Remove the two caliper mounting bolts-1998 vehicle

To install:
  1. Lubricate the inner diameters of the caliper bolt bushings with silicone grease, at the points shown in the accompanying illustration. Lubricate the caliper bolts using silicone grease. Do not lubricate the threads.
  2.  



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Fig. Fig. 11: Caliper mounting bolt sleeve and bushing lubrication points

  1. Inspect the caliper guide pins. The pin should slide through the pin bushing and pin bores using only hand pressure.
  2.  
  3. Inspect the mounting bores for corrosion. If any corrosion is found, remove using a 1 in. wheel cylinder brush. Clean the mounting bores using clean, denatured alcohol. Replace the caliper pins and bushings.
  4.  
  5. For 1993-97 vehicles, position the caliper housing onto the rotor and knuckle and tighten the mounting bolts to 38 ft. lbs. (51 Nm).
  6.  
  7. For 1998 vehicles, install the caliper onto the mounting plate and pads. Install the caliper guide pins and tighten to 23 ft. lbs. (31 Nm).
  8.  
  9. If removed, install the brake hose fitting, new copper gaskets and the brake hose to the caliper housing. Tighten the brake hose fitting to 30-32 ft. lbs. (40-44 Nm).
  10.  
  11. Remove the lug nuts securing the rotor.
  12.  
  13. Install the wheel and tire assembly, then carefully lower the vehicle.
  14.  
  15. Fill the master cylinder with brake fluid. If the brake hose was disconnected, bleed the brake system
  16.  


CAUTION
Before moving the vehicle, pump the brakes several times to seat the brake pad against the rotor.

OVERHAUL



Single Piston

See Figures 12 through 18



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Fig. Fig. 12: Exploded view of the single piston front caliper

  1. Remove the caliper.
  2.  
  3. Remove the pads.
  4.  
  5. Place some cloths or a slat of wood in front of the piston. Remove the piston by applying compressed air to the fluid inlet fitting. Use just enough air pressure to ease the piston from the bore.
  6.  



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Fig. Fig. 13: Use compressed air to drive the piston out of the caliper, but make sure to keep your fingers clear



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Fig. Fig. 14: Withdraw the piston from the caliper bore


CAUTION
Do not try to catch the piston with your fingers, it can result in serious injury.

  1. Remove the piston boot with a wood or plastic tool, working carefully so that the piston bore is not scratched.
  2.  
  3. Remove the bleeder screw.
  4.  
  5. Inspect the piston for scoring, nicks, corrosion, wear, etc., and damaged or worn chrome plating. Replace the piston if any defects are found.
  6.  
  7. Remove the piston seal from the caliper bore groove using a piece of pointed wood or plastic. Do not use a screwdriver, which will damage the bore. Inspect the caliper bore for nicks, corrosion, and wear. Very light wear can be cleaned up with crocus cloth. Use finger pressure to rub the crocus cloth around the circumference of the bore - do not slide it in and out. More extensive wear or corrosion warrants replacement of the part.
  8.  



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Fig. Fig. 15: Use a prytool to carefully pry around the edge of the boot ...



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Fig. Fig. 16: ... then remove the boot from the caliper housing, taking care not to score or damage the bore



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Fig. Fig. 17: Use extreme caution when removing the piston seal; DO NOT scratch the caliper bore

  1. Clean any parts which are to be reused in denatured alcohol. Dry them with compressed air or allow to air dry. Don't wipe the parts dry with a cloth, which will leave behind bits of lint.
  2.  
  3. Lubricate the new seal, provided in the repair kit, with clean brake fluid. Install the seal in its groove, making sure it is fully seated and not twisted.
  4.  
  5. Install the new dust boot on the piston. Lubricate the bore of the caliper with clean brake fluid and insert the piston into its bore. Position the boot in the caliper housing and seat with a seal driver of the appropriate size, or GM tool no. J-26267.
  6.  



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Fig. Fig. 18: Use the proper size driving tool and a mallet to properly seal the boots in the caliper housing

  1. Install the bleeder screw, tightening to 80-140 inch lbs. (9-16 Nm). Do not over tighten.
  2.  
  3. Install the pads, install the caliper, and bleed the brakes.
  4.  

Dual Piston

See Figure 19



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Fig. Fig. 19: Exploded view of the dual piston front caliper

  1. Remove the caliper.
  2.  
  3. Remove the pads.
  4.  
  5. Place some cloths and a 1 in. (25mm) piece of wood in front of one of the pistons. Remove 1 of the pistons by applying compressed air to the fluid inlet fitting. Move the piece of wood to the other piston which was just partially removed and now remove the other piston in the same manner. Use just enough air pressure to ease the pistons from the bore.
  6.  


CAUTION
Do not try to catch the piston with your fingers, it can result in serious injury. Keep the rag over the assembly to avoid brake fluid from being sprayed everywhere.

  1. Remove the piston boots with a plastic or wood tool, so the seal grooves will not be damaged.
  2.  
  3. Remove the bleeder screw.
  4.  
  5. Inspect the piston for scoring, nicks, corrosion, wear, etc., and damaged or worn chrome plating. Replace the piston if any defects are found.
  6.  
  7. Remove the piston seal from the caliper bore groove using a piece of pointed wood or plastic. Do not use a screwdriver, which will damage the bore. Inspect the caliper bore for nicks, corrosion, and wear. Very light wear can be cleaned up with crocus cloth. Use finger pressure to rub the crocus cloth around the circumference of the bore - do not slide it in and out. More extensive wear or corrosion warrants replacement of the part.
  8.  
  9. Clean any parts which are to be reused in denatured alcohol. Dry them with compressed air or allow to air dry. Don't wipe the parts dry with a cloth, which will leave behind bits of lint.
  10.  
  11. Lubricate the new seals, provided in the repair kit, with clean brake fluid. Install the seals in their grooves, making sure they are fully seated and not twisted.
  12.  
  13. Install the new dust boots on the piston as illustrated with the fold facing outward. Lubricate the bore of the caliper with clean brake fluid and insert the piston into its bore. Position the boot into the caliper groove and slide the caliper piston into the bore. Repeat the procedure for the other piston.
  14.  
  15. Install the bleeder screw, tightening to 80-140 inch lbs. (9-16 Nm.). Do not over tighten.
  16.  
  17. Install the pads, install the caliper, and bleed the brakes.
  18.  

 
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