GM Firebird 1982-1992 Repair Guide

Brake Pads

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INSPECTION




CAUTION
Some brake pads contain asbestos, which has been determined to be a cancer causing agent. Never clean the brake surfaces with compressed air! Avoid inhaling any dust from any brake surface! When cleaning brake surfaces, use a commercially available brake cleaning fluid.

The pad thickness should be inspected every time that the tires are removed for rotation. The outer pad can be checked by looking in each end, which is the point at which the highest rate of wear occurs. The inner pad can be checked by looking down through the inspection hole in the top of the caliper. If the thickness of the pad is worn to within 0.030 in. (0.8mm) of the rivet at either end of the pad, all the pads should be replaced.

Always replace all pads on both front wheels at the same time. Failure to do so will result in uneven braking action and premature wear.

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 through 7



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Fig. Fig. 1: Compress the piston with a C-clamp



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Fig. Fig. 2: Remove the caliper bolts



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Fig. Fig. 3: Lift off the caliper



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Fig. Fig. 4: Remove the inner pad



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Fig. Fig. 5: Remove the outer pad



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Fig. Fig. 6: Install the inner pad retaining clip



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Fig. Fig. 7: Bend the outboard pad ears after installation

  1. Siphon 2 / 3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir. Loosen the wheel lug nuts and raise the car. Remove the wheel.
  2.  
  3. Position a C-clamp across the caliper and press on the pads. Tighten it until the caliper piston bottoms in its bore.
  4.  

If you haven't removed some brake fluid from the master cylinder, it may overflow when the piston is retracted.

  1. Remove the C-clamp.
  2.  

There are 2 different calipers being used, a single piston or dual piston design. The single piston design uses either an Allen head bolt, regular bolt or Torx® head bolt to secure the caliper to the mounting bracket. Do not use a socket in place of the Torx® socket, otherwise damage to the bolt may occur. The dual piston caliper uses a slide pin and circlip to secure it to the bracket.

  1. Remove the mounting bolts, if equipped with single piston caliper or the circlip and pin, if equipped with dual piston caliper. Inspect the bolts for corrosion and replace as necessary.
  2.  
  3. Remove the caliper from the steering knuckle and suspend it from the body of the car with a length of wire. Do not allow the caliper to hang by its hose.
  4.  
  5. Remove the pad retaining springs and remove the pads from the caliper.
  6.  
  7. Remove the plastic sleeves and the rubber bushings from the mounting bolt holes.
  8.  
  9. Obtain a pad replacement kit. Lubricate and install the new sleeves and bushings with a light coat of silicone grease.
  10.  
  11. Install the retainer spring on the inboard pad, if equipped with single piston caliper.
  12.  

A new spring should be included in the pad replacement kit.

  1. Install the new inboard pad into the caliper with the wear sensor at the leading end of the shoe during forward wheel rotation.
  2.  
  3. Install the outboard pad into the caliper.
  4.  
  5. Use a large pair of slip joint pliers to bend the outer pad ears down over the caliper, if equipped with the single piston caliper.
  6.  
  7. Install the caliper onto the steering knuckle. Tighten the mounting bolts to 21-35 ft. lbs. (28-47 Nm), if equipped. Install the wheel and lower the car. Fill the master cylinder to its proper level with a good quality brake fluid.
  8.  
  9. Pump the brake pedal slowly and firmly 3 times with the engine running before attempting to move the vehicle; bleed the brakes as required.
  10.  

 
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