Honda Accord/Civic/Prelude 1973-1983 Repair Guide

Brake Hoses And Pipes

Print

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 and 2

All brake lines and hoses should be checked for rust, holes, kinks, tears and any sign of deterioration. Any hose showing these signs should be replaced. Always replace brake hose or lines with parts specifically designed for the braking system. Parts that are not designed for brake systems can fail under the extreme pressures that are present in the system.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 1: Front brake hose retaining location



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 2: Rear brake line retaining location

The brake system lines can be replaced by disconnecting them at their mounting points along the underside of the vehicle and at the components that they attach to. Tighten brake lines-to-brake hoses to 10 ft. lbs. The brake hoses, which are rubber are located at each wheel. They can be replaced by disconnecting them from the brake line and then from the caliper or wheel cylinder. Tighten all brake hose-to-wheel cylinder fittings to 14 ft. lbs. Brake hose-to-caliper connection should be tightened to 25 ft. lbs. Always bleed the brake system after replacing any components.

If the new metal line requires bending, do so gently using a pipe bending tool. Do not attempt to bend the tubing by hand.

BRAKE LINE FLARING



Use only brake line tubing approved for automotive use; never use copper tubing. Whenever possible, try to work with brake lines that are already cut to the length needed. These lines are available at most auto parts stores and have machine made flares, the quality of which is hard to duplicate with most of the available inexpensive flaring kits.

When the brakes are applied, there is a great amount of pressure developed in the hydraulic system. An improperly formed flare can leak with resultant loss of stopping power. If you have never formed a double-flare, take time to familiarize yourself with the flaring kit; practice forming double-flares on scrap tubing until you are satisfied with the results.

The following procedure applies to most commercially available double-flaring kits. If these instructions differ in any way from those in your kit, follow the instructions in the kit.

  1. Cut the brake line to the necessary length using a tubing cutter.
  2.  
  3. Square the end of the tube with a file and chamfer the edges.
  4.  
  5. Insert the tube into the proper size hole in the bar until the end of the tube sticks out the thickness of the single flare adapter. Tighten the bar wing nuts tightly so the tube cannot move.
  6.  
  7. Place the single flare adapter into the tube and slide the bar into the yoke.
  8.  
  9. Position the yoke screw over the single flare adapter and tighten it until the bar is locked in the yoke. Continue tightening the yoke screw until the adapter bottoms on the bar. This should form the single flare.
  10.  

Make sure the tube is not forced out of the hole in the bar during the single flare operation. If it is, the single flare will not be formed properly and the procedure must be repeated from Step 1.

  1. Loosen the yoke screw and remove the single flare adapter.
  2.  
  3. Position the yoke screw over the tube and tighten until the taper contacts the single flare and the bar is locked in the yoke. Continue tightening to form the double flare.
  4.  

Make sure the tube is not forced out of the hole in the bar during the double flare operation. If it is, the double flare will not be formed properly and the procedure must be repeated from Step 1.

  1. Loosen the screw and remove the bar from the yoke. Remove the tube from the bar.
  2.  
  3. Check the flare for cracks or uneven flaring. If the flare is not perfect, cut it off and begin again at Step 1.
  4.  

 
label.common.footer.alt.autozoneLogo