Jeep CJ 1945-1970 Repair Information

Belts

Print

INSPECTION



See Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 1: An example of a healthy drive belt



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 2: Deep cracks in this belt will cause flex, building up heat that will eventually lead to belt failure



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 3: The cover of this belt is worn, exposing the critical reinforcing cords to excessive wear



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 4: Installing too wide a belt can result in serious belt wear and/or breakage

The belts which drive the engine accessories such as the alternator, the air pump, power steering pump, air conditioning compressor and water pump are of either the V-belt design or flat, serpentine design. Older belts show wear and damage readily, since their basic design was a belt with a rubber casing. As the casing wore, cracks and fibers were readily apparent. Newer design, caseless belts do not show wear as readily, and many untrained people cannot distinguish between a good, serviceable belt and one that is worn to the point of failure.

It is a good idea, therefore, to visually inspect the belts regularly and replace them, routinely, every two to three years.

ADJUSTING



See Figures 5 and 6



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 5: Accessory drive belt tension can be measured by the amount of deflection present between two of the belt pulleys



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 6: Some accessory drive pulleys are equipped with a rectangular slot to aid in tensioning the drive belt

Belts are normally adjusted by loosening the bolts of the accessory being driven and moving that accessory on its pivot points until the proper tension is applied to the belt. The accessory is held in this position while the bolts are tightened. To determine proper belt tension, you can purchase a belt tension gauge or simply use the deflection method. To determine deflection, press inward on the belt at the mid-point of its longest straight run. The belt should deflect (move inward) 3 / 8 - 1 / 2 in. (9.5-12.7mm). Some long V-belts and most serpentine belts have idler pulleys which are used for adjusting purposes. Just loosen the idler pulley and move it to take up tension on the belt.

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 7, 8, 9 and 10



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 7: To remove the belts, first loosen the mounting and adjusting bolts slightly ...



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 8: ... then push the component toward the engine and slip the belt off of the drive pulley



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 9: Position the new belt over all applicable pulleys ...



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 10: ... then pull outward on the component and tighten the bolts-make sure to properly tension the drive belt

To remove a drive belt, simply loosen the accessory being driven and move it on its pivot point to free the belt. Then, remove the belt. If an idler pulley is used, it is often necessary, only, to loosen the idler pulley to provide enough slack the remove the belt.

It is important to note, however, that on engines with many driven accessories, several or all of the belts may have to be removed to get at the one to be replaced.

 
label.common.footer.alt.autozoneLogo