Jeep Wagoneer/Commando/Cherokee 1957-1983 Repair Information

Disc Brake Pads

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REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 through 14

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Fig. Fig. 1: Exploded view of the disc brake assembly used on all models



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Fig. Fig. 2: Cross-sectional views of piston extension on new and worn linings



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Fig. Fig. 3: Bottoming the caliper piston



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Fig. Fig. 4: Removing the caliper mounting bolts



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Fig. Fig. 5: Removing the caliper from the rotor



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Fig. Fig. 6: Installing the support spring on the inboard brake pad



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Fig. Fig. 7: Installing the inboard brake pad



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Fig. Fig. 8: Typical front disc brake assembly



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Fig. Fig. 9: Use a C-clamp to bottom the piston in the caliper bore (this will allow clearance for installation of the new pads)



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Fig. Fig. 10: Loosen and remove the caliper mounting bolts/pins



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Fig. Fig. 11: Remove the caliper from the rotor assembly



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Fig. Fig. 12: Remove the outboard pad from the caliper ...



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Fig. Fig. 13: ... then remove the inboard pad



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Fig. Fig. 14: When working on the brakes, support the caliper assembly to prevent damage to the brake line


CAUTION
Brake shoes contain asbestos, which has been determined to be a cancer causing agent. Never clean the brake surfaces with compressed air! Avoid inhaling any dust from any brake surface! When cleaning brake surfaces, use a commercially available brake cleaning fluid.

  1. Raise and support the vehicle with jackstands and remove the wheel(s) on the side to be worked on.
  2.  
  3. Drain 2 / 3 of the brake fluid from the front reservoir. Use the bleeder screw at the front outlet port to drain the fluid.
  4.  
  5. Raise the vehicle so that the wheel to be worked on is off the ground. Support the vehicle with jackstands.
  6.  
  7. Remove the front wheels.
  8.  
  9. Place a C-clamp on the caliper so that the solid end contacts the back of the caliper and the screw end contacts the metal part of the outboard brake pad.
  10.  
  11. Tighten the clamp until the caliper moves far enough to force the piston to the bottom of the piston bore. This will back the brake pads off of the rotor surface to facilitate the removal and installation of the caliper assembly.
  12.  
  13. Remove the C-clamp.
  14.  

Do not push down on the brake pedal or the piston and brake pads will return to their original positions up against the rotor.

  1. Remove both of the allen head mounting bolts and lift the caliper off the rotor.
  2.  
  3. Remove the brake pad assemblies. Remove the support spring from the inboard pad. Note the position of the spring before removing it for correct installation later.
  4.  
  5. Remove the sleeves from the inboard ears of the caliper. Remove the rubber bushings from all the holes in the caliper ears. Discard all bushings and sleeves.
  6.  
  7. Clean all the mounting holes and bushing grooves in the caliper ears. Clean the mounting bolts. Replace the bolts if they are corroded or if the threads are damaged. Wipe the inside of the caliper clean, including the exterior of the dust boot. Inspect the dust boot for cuts or cracks and for proper seating in the piston bore. If evidence of fluid leakage is noted, the caliper should be rebuilt.
  8.  

Do not use abrasives on the bolts in order not to destroy their protective plating. You should not use compressed air to clean the inside of the caliper, as it may unseat the dust boot seal.

  1. Lubricate the new bushings, sleeves, bushing grooves and the small ends of the mounting bolts with a silicone lubricant. Install the rubber bushings in all of the caliper mounting ears.
  2.  
  3. Install the sleeves in the inboard mounting ears of the caliper. Position the sleeves so that the sleeve end facing the brake pad lining is flush with the machined surface of the mounting ear.
  4.  
  5. Install the support spring on the inboard brake pad. Place the single tang end of the spring over the notch in the pad. The double tang end of the spring clips onto the bottom of the pad.
  6.  
  7. Install the inboard pad in the caliper. The pad must lay flat against the piston. Be sure that the support spring is fully seated in the piston.
  8.  
  9. Install the outboard pad in the caliper. The ears on the pad should rest on the top of the ears in the caliper. The bottom tab on the pad fits in the cutout in the caliper. Be sure the pad is fully seated.
  10.  
  11. With the pads installed, position the caliper over the rotor. Line up the mounting holes in the caliper and the support bracket and insert the mounting bolts. Make sure that the bolts pass under the retaining ears on the inboards shoes. Push the bolts through until they engage the holes of the outboard pad and caliper ears. Thread the bolts into the support bracket and tighten them to 35 ft. lb.
  12.  
  13. Fill the master cylinder with brake fluid and pump the brake pedal to seat the pads.
  14.  
  15. Use a pair of locking pliers to bend (clinch) both of the upper ears of the outboard shoe until the radial clearance between the pad and the caliper is eliminated.
  16.  

Outboard pads with formed ears are designed for original installation only and are fitted to the caliper. The pads should never be relined or reconditioned for installation.

  1. Install the wheel assembly and lower the vehicle. Check the level of the brake fluid in the master cylinder and fill as necessary. Test the operation of the brakes before taking the vehicle onto the road.
  2.  

 
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