Montana, Silhouette, Venture 2000-2005

General Testing

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It is important to test terminal contact at the component and any inline connectors before replacing a suspect component. Mating terminals must be inspected to ensure good terminal contact. A poor connection between the male and female terminal at a connector may be the result of contamination or deformation.

Contamination may be caused by the connector halves being improperly connected. A missing or damaged connector seal, damage to the connector itself, or exposing the terminals to moisture and dirt can also cause contamination. Contamination, usually in the underhood or underbody connectors, leads to terminal corrosion, causing an open circuit or intermittently open circuit.

Deformation is caused by probing the mating side of a connector terminal without the proper adapter. Always use the appropriate test kit when probing connectors. Other causes of terminal deformation are improperly joining the connector halves, or repeatedly separating and joining the connector halves. Deformation, usually to the female terminal contact tang, can result in poor terminal contact causing an open or intermittently open circuit.

When the condition is not currently present, but is indicated in DTC history, the cause may be intermittent. An intermittent may also be the cause when there is a customer complaint, but the symptom cannot be duplicated. Refer to the Symptom Table of the system that is suspect of causing the condition before trying to locate an intermittent condition.

Most intermittent conditions are caused by faulty electrical connections or wiring. Inspect for the following items:



Wiring broken inside the insulation
 
Poor connection between the male and female terminal at a connector
 
Poor terminal to wire connection--Some conditions which fall under this description are poor crimps, poor solder joints, crimping over the wire insulation rather than the wire itself, and corrosion in the wire to terminal contact area, etc.
 
Pierced or damaged insulation can allow moisture to enter the wiring causing corrosion. The conductor can corrode inside the insulation, with little visible evidence. Look for swollen and stiff sections of wire in the suspect circuits.
 
Wiring which has been pinched, cut, or its insulation rubbed through may cause an intermittent open or short as the bare area touches other wiring or parts of the vehicle.
 
Wiring that comes in contact with hot or exhaust components
 

Test all control module voltage supply circuits. Many vehicles have multiple circuits supplying voltage to a control module. Other components in the system may have separate voltage supply circuits that may also need to be tested. Inspect connections at the module/component connectors, fuses, and any intermediate connections between the voltage source and the module/component. A test lamp or a Digital Multimeter may indicate that voltage is present, but neither tests the ability of the circuit to carry sufficient current. Ensure that the circuit can carry the current necessary to operate the component.

Test all control module ground and system ground circuits. The control module may have multiple ground circuits. Other components in the system may have separate grounds that may also need to be tested. Inspect grounds for clean and tight connections at the grounding point. Inspect the connections at the component and in splice packs, where applicable. Ensure that the circuit can carry the current necessary to operate the component.

 
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