Neon, 2000 - 2005

Accessing Components & Circuits

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Fig.

Every vehicle and every diagnostic situation is different. It is a good idea to first determine the best diagnostic path to follow using flow charts, wiring diagrams, TSBs, etc. Part of choosing steps is to determine how time-consuming and effective each step will be. It may be easy to access a component or circuit in one vehicle, but difficult in another. Many circuits are integrated into a large harness and are difficult to test. Many components are inaccessible without disassembly of unrelated systems.

In the graphic, you will note that the protective covers have been removed from the PCM connectors, and any circuit can be easily identified and back probed. In other cases, PCM access is difficult, and it may be easier to access circuits at the component side of the harness.

Another important point to remember is that any circuit or component controlled by a relay or fused circuit can be monitored from the appropriate fuse box.

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Fig.

There is generally more than one of each type of relay or fuse. Therefore, swapping a suspect relay from another system may be more efficient than testing the relay itself. Relays and fuses may also be removed and replaced with fused jumper wires for testing circuits. Jumper wires can also provide a loop for inductive amperage tests.

Choosing the easiest way has its limitations, however. Remember that an appropriate signal on a PCM controlled circuit at an actuator means that the signal at the PCM is also good. However, a sensor signal at the sensor does not necessarily mean that the PCM is receiving the same signal. Think about the direction flow through a circuit, and not just what signal is appropriate, to save time without making costly assumptions.

 
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