Nissan Z - ZX 1970-1988 Repair Guide

Timing Belt

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WARNING
All 1984-88 Nissan Z and ZX engines are equipped with timing belts. Since these engines are of an "interference type'' design, if the timing belt breaks, the valves may contact the piston heads and cause extensive engine damage. Therefore, regular timing belt inspection and replacement is very important.

All engines on 1984 and later models are equipped with a rubber and fiber timing belts, as opposed to a timing chain. Although rubber and fiber constructed timing belts are extremely reliable, regular inspection is needed.

INSPECTION



See Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

Because the timing belt is made partly of rubber, regular inspection is important. Visually inspect the timing belt every 3,000 miles (4,800 km), or every time the oil is changed and replace the timing belt every 60,000 miles (96,000 km). This is extremely important because in the event the timing belt does break, the valves will contact the piston heads; this may result in extensive and expensive engine damage.

To inspect the condition of the timing belt, remove the plastic or metal protective cover. Visually inspect the timing belt for tears, worn edges or cracks. Replace the belt if any of these conditions are found.

Grasp the timing belt with two finger at a point equally distanced between two pulleys. Attempt to rotate the timing belt in a 60-110° direction. If the belt can be rotated any more than 110°, the belt is too loose and must be tightened. If the belt will not rotate 60°, it is too tight, and should be loosened.



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Fig. Fig. 1: Never allow oil, water or steam to contact the belt



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Fig. Fig. 2: Check for premature parting of the belt



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Fig. Fig. 3: Check if the teeth are cracked or damaged



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Fig. Fig. 4: Look for noticeable cracks or wear on the belt face



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Fig. Fig. 5: You may only have damage on one side of the belt; if so, the guide could be the culprit



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Fig. Fig. 6: Foreign materials can get in between the teeth and cause damage

 
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