PT Cruiser, 2001 - 2005

Routine Maintenance & Tune-Up

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Accessory Drive Belts



Accessory Belt Routing


Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Accessory drive belt routing-2.4L engine

Inspection

Inspect the drive belt for signs of glazing or cracking. A glazed belt will be perfectly smooth from slippage, while a good belt will have a slight texture of fabric visible. Cracks will usually start at the inner edge of the belt and run outward. All worn or damaged drive belts should be replaced immediately.

Removal & Installation
Generator Belt
  1. Remove power steering pump/air conditioning compressor drive belt.
  2.  
  3. Loosen pivot bolt, then locking nut and adjusting bolt.
  4.  
  5. Remove generator belt.
  6.  

To install:


NOTE
When installing drive belt onto pulleys, make sure that belt is properly routed and all V-grooves make proper contact with pulley grooves.

  1. Install belt and/or adjust belt tension by tightening adjusting bolt. Adjust belt to specification shown in Belt Tension Chart.
  2.  
  3. Check belt tension using Special Tool 8371 - Belt Tension Gauge Adapter, and the DRBIII® using the following procedures:
    CAUTION
    Do not check belt tension with the engine running.

  4.  
  5. Connect 8371 to the DRBIII® following the instructions provided in tool kit.
  6.  
  7. Place end of microphone probe approximately 1 in. (2.54cm) from belt at one of the belt center span locations shown in.
  8.  
  9. Pluck the belt a minimum of 3 times. (Use your finger or other suitable object)
  10.  
  11. The frequency of the belt in hertz (Hz) will display on DRBIII® screen.
  12.  
  13. Adjust belt to obtain proper frequency (tension). Refer to the belt tension chart for specifications.
  14.  
  15. Tighten pivot bolt to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm) and locking nut to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm). Install power steering pump/air conditioning compressor drive belt.
  16.  

Power Steering And Air Conditioning Compressor Belt
  1. Remove belt splash shield.
  2.  
  3. Using a wrench, rotate belt tensioner clockwise until belt can be removed from power steering pump pulley. Gently, release spring tension on tensioner.
  4.  
  5. Remove belt.
  6.  

To install:


NOTE
When installing drive belt onto pulleys, make sure that belt is properly routed and all V-grooves make proper contact with pulley grooves.

  1. Install belt over all pulleys except for the power steering pump pulley.
  2.  
  3. Using a wrench, rotate belt tensioner clockwise until belt can be installed onto power steering pump pulley. Release spring tension onto belt.
  4.  
  5. After belt is installed, inspect belt length indicator marks. The indicator mark should be within the minimum belt length and maximum belt length marks. On a new belt, the indicator mark should align approximately with the nominal belt length mark.
  6.  
  7. Install belt splash shield .
  8.  

Firing Orders





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Fig. 2.4L Engine Firing order: 1-3-4-2 Distributorless Ignition System

Fuel Filter



The fuel filter is part of the fuel pump module located in the fuel tank. It is serviced as part of the fuel pump module.

Idle Speed & Mixture Adjustments



The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) adjusts engine idle speed through the idle air control valve to compensate for engine load, coolant temperature or barometric pressure changes. No adjustment is necessary or possible.

Ignition Timing



The ignition timing is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). No adjustment is necessary or possible.

Spark Plugs & Wires



Spark Plugs
Inspection and Gapping

Cold Fouling/Carbon Fouling: Cold fouling is sometimes referred to as carbon fouling. The deposits that cause cold fouling are basically carbon. A dry, black deposit on one or two plugs in a set may be caused by sticking valves or defective spark plug cables. Cold (carbon) fouling of the entire set of spark plugs may be caused by a clogged air cleaner element or repeated short operating times (short trips).

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Fig. Cold fouling/carbon fouling spark plugs

Wet Fouling or Gas Fouling: A spark plug coated with excessive wet fuel or oil is wet fouled. In older engines, worn piston rings, leaking valve guide seals or excessive cylinder wear can cause wet fouling. In new or recently overhauled engines, wet fouling may occur before break-in (normal oil control) is achieved. This condition can usually be resolved by cleaning and reinstalling the fouled plugs.

Oil or Ash Encrusted: If one or more spark plugs are oil or oil ash encrusted, evaluate engine condition for the cause of oil entry into that particular combustion chamber.

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Fig. Oil or ash encrusted spark plug

Electrode Gap Bridging: Electrode gap bridging may be traced to loose deposits in the combustion chamber. These deposits accumulate on the spark plugs during continuous stop-and-go driving. When the engine is suddenly subjected to a high torque load, deposits partially liquefy and bridge the gap between electrodes. This short circuits the electrodes. Spark plugs with electrode gap bridging can be cleaned using standard procedures.

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Fig. Electrode gap bridging

Scavenger Deposits: Fuel scavenger deposits may be either white or yellow. They may appear to be harmful, but this is a normal condition caused by chemical additives in certain fuels. These additives are designed to change the chemical nature of deposits and decrease spark plug misfire tendencies. Notice that accumulation on the ground electrode and shell area may be heavy, but the deposits are easily removed. Spark plugs with scavenger deposits can be considered normal in condition and can be cleaned using standard procedures.

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Fig. Scavenger deposits

Chipped Electrode Insulator: A chipped electrode insulator usually results from bending the center electrode while adjusting the spark plug electrode gap. Under certain conditions, severe detonation can also separate the insulator from the center electrode. Spark plugs with this condition must be replaced.

Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Chipped electrode insulator

Pre-Ignition Damage: Pre-ignition damage is usually caused by excessive combustion chamber temperature. The center electrode dissolves first and the ground electrode dissolves somewhat latter. Insulators appear relatively deposit free. Determine if the spark plug has the correct heat range rating for the engine. Determine if ignition timing is over advanced or if other operating conditions are causing engine overheating. (The heat range rating refers to the operating temperature of a particular type spark plug. Spark plugs are designed to operate within specific temperature ranges. This depends upon the thickness and length of the center electrodes porcelain insulator.)


CAUTION
If the engine is equipped with copper core ground electrode spark plugs, they must be replaced with the same type/number spark plug as the original. If another spark plug is substituted, pre-ignition will result.



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Fig. Pre-ignition damage

Spark Plug Overheating: Overheating is indicated by a white or gray center electrode insulator that also appears blistered. The increase in electrode gap will be considerably in excess of 0.001 inch per 2000 miles of operation. This suggests that a plug with a cooler heat range rating should be used. Over advanced ignition timing, detonation and cooling system malfunctions can also cause spark plug overheating.


CAUTION
If the engine is equipped with copper core ground electrode spark plugs, they must be replaced with the same type/number spark plug as the original. If another spark plug is substituted, pre-ignition will result.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Spark plug overheating

Removal & Installation

WARNING
Failure to route the cables properly could cause the radio to reproduce ignition noise, cross ignition of the spark plugs or short circuit the cables to ground.


NOTE
Remove cables from coil first before removing spark plug insulator. Special care should be used when installing spark plugs in the 2.4L cylinder head spark plug wells. Be sure the plugs do not drop into the wells, damage to the electrodes can occur. Always tighten spark plugs to the specified torque. Over tightening can cause distortion resulting in a change in the spark plug gap. Over tightening can also damage the cylinder head.

  1. Remove the air cleaner lid, disconnect the inlet air sensor and makeup air hose.
  2.  
  3. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  4.  
  5. Remove the upper intake manifold, refer to the Engine section for more information.
  6.  
  7. Disconnect the cable from the ignition coil first.
  8.  
  9. Always remove the spark plug cable by grasping the top of the spark plug insulator, rotate the boot 90° and pulling straight up in a steady motion.
  10.  
  11. Remove the spark plug using a quality socket with a rubber or foam insert.
  12.  
  13. Inspect the spark plug condition.
  14.  

To install:

  1. To avoid cross threading, start the spark plug into the cylinder head by hand.
    WARNING
    The tapered seat plugs for this application are torque-critical! It is imperative that 11-15 ft. lbs. (15.6-19.6 Nm) is NOT exceeded!

  2.  
  3. Tighten spark plugs to 11-15 ft. lbs. (15.6-19.6 Nm).
  4.  
  5. Install spark plug insulators over spark plugs. Ensure the top of the spark plug insulator covers the upper end of the spark plug tube.
  6.  
  7. Install spark plug cable to coil.
  8.  
  9. Install the upper intake manifold, refer to the Engine section for more information
  10.  
  11. Connect the negative battery cable.
  12.  
  13. Install the air cleaner lid and connect the inlet air temperature sensor and makeup hose.
  14.  

 
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