Quest 1995-1996

Power Brake Booster

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Specific to:

Mercury Villager 1993-2000

Nissan Quest 1993-2000

Virtually all modern vehicles use a vacuum assisted power brake system to multiply the braking force and reduce pedal effort. Since vacuum is always available when the engine is operating, the system is simple and efficient. A vacuum diaphragm is located on the front of the master cylinder and assists the driver in applying the brakes, reducing both the effort and travel he must put into moving the brake pedal.

The vacuum diaphragm housing is connected to the intake manifold by a vacuum hose. A check valve is placed at the point where the hose enters the diaphragm housing, so that during periods of low manifold vacuum, power assist will not be lost.

Depressing the brake pedal closes off the vacuum source and allows atmospheric pressure to enter on one side of the diaphragm. This causes the master cylinder pistons to move and apply the brakes. When the brake pedal is released, vacuum is applied to both sides of the diaphragm and springs return the diaphragm and master cylinder pistons to the released position.

If the vacuum supply fails, the brake pedal rod will contact the end of the master cylinder actuator rod and the system will apply the brakes without any power assistance. The driver will notice that much higher pedal effort is needed to stop the car and that the pedal feels harder than usual.

Specific to:

Mercury Villager 1993-2000

Nissan Quest 1993-2000



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Exploded view of the power brake booster and brake pedal assemblies

Removal & Installation



  1. Remove the master cylinder. Please refer to Master Cylinder, Removal and Installation for the procedure.
  2.  
  3. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the power brake booster.
  4.  
  5. Inside of the passenger compartment, remove the spring clip from the brake pedal clevis pin. Remove the pin.
  6.  
  7. Remove the four power brake booster nuts.
  8.  
  9. Remove the power brake booster from the vehicle.
  10.  

To install:

  1. The installation is the reverse of removal, but please note the following important steps.
  2.  
  3. Before installing the booster, check and adjust the brake pedal-to-booster push rod length, if needed. The length should be approximately 4.75 inches (120mm) from the face of the booster to the center of the push rod hole.
  4.  
  5. Before installing the booster, check and adjust the booster-to-master cylinder push rod length, if needed. With a hand vacuum pump, apply approximately 20 in. Hg (50cm Hg) of vacuum to the booster. Apply 4.4 lbs. (19.6 N) of pressure to the end of the push rod and measure the length from the face of the booster to the end of the push rod. The length should be 0.405 - 0.414 inch (10.275 - 10.525mm).
  6.  
  7. When installing the power brake booster nuts, tighten them to 9 - 12 ft. lbs. (13 - 16 Nm).
  8.  
  9. When installing the vacuum hose, make sure that it is pushed onto the booster fitting at least 1 inch (24mm).
  10.  

Testing



System Operation Test

Specific to:

Mercury Villager 1993-2000

Nissan Quest 1993-2000

  1. With the engine OFF , pump the brake pedal until the supply vacuum is entirely gone.
  2.  
  3. Put light, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  4.  
  5. Start the engine and let it idle. If the system is operating correctly, the brake pedal should fall toward the floor if the constant pressure is maintained.
  6.  

Power brake systems may be tested for hydraulic leaks just as ordinary systems are tested.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig.

Vacuum Leak Test

Specific to:

Mercury Villager 1993-2000

Nissan Quest 1993-2000

  1. Operate the engine at idle without touching the brake pedal for at least one minute.
  2.  
  3. Turn off the engine and wait one minute.
  4.  
  5. Test for the presence of assist vacuum by depressing the brake pedal and releasing it several times. If vacuum is present in the system, light application will produce less and less pedal travel. If there is no vacuum, air is leaking into the system.
  6.  

 
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