Quest 1995-1996

Timing Belt

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Inspection



Specific to:

Mercury Villager 1993-2000

Nissan Quest 1993-2000

Inspect both sides of the timing belt. Replace the belt with a new one if any of the following conditions exist:



Hardening of the rubber-back side is glossy without resilience and leaves no indentation when pressed with a fingernail
 
Cracks on the rubber backing
 
Cracks or peeling of the canvas backing
 
Cracks on rib root
 
Cracks on belt sides
 
Missing teeth or chunks of teeth
 
Abnormal wear of belt sides-the sides are normal if they are sharp, as if cut by a knife.

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Fig. Check for premature parting of the belt



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Fig. Check if the teeth are cracked or damaged



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Fig. Look for noticeable cracks or wear on the belt face



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Fig. You may only have damage on one side of the belt; if so, the guide could be the culprit



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Fig. Foreign materials can get in between the teeth and cause damage



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Fig. Inspect the timing belt for cracks, fraying, glazing or damage of any kind



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Fig. Damage on only one side of the timing belt may indicate a faulty guide



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Fig. ALWAYS replace the timing belt at the interval specified by the manufacturer

 

Removal & Installation



Specific to:

Mercury Villager 1993-2000

Nissan Quest 1993-2000

The 3.0L and 3.3L engines utilize a timing belt to drive the camshafts from the crankshaft's turning motion and to maintain proper valve timing. Some manufacturers schedule periodic timing belt replacement to assure optimum engine performance, to make sure the motorist is never stranded should the belt break (as the engine will stop instantly) and for some (manufacturers with interference motors) to prevent the possibility of severe internal engine damage should the belt break.

Although the 3.0L and 3.3L engines are not listed as interference motors (they are not listed by the manufacturer as a motor whose valves might contact the pistons if the camshafts were rotated separately from the crankshaft) the first two reasons for periodic replacement still apply. Mercury and Nissan recommend timing belt replacement every 105,000 miles (168,000 km), however, most belt manufacturers recommend intervals anywhere from 45,000 miles (72,500 km) to 90,000 miles (145,000 km). You will have to decide for yourself if the peace of mind offered by a new belt is worth it on higher mileage engines.

Whether or not you decide to replace it, you would be wise to check it periodically to make sure it has not become damaged or worn. Generally speaking, a severely worn belt may cause engine performance to drop dramatically, but a damaged belt (which could give out suddenly) may not give as much warning. In general, any time the engine timing covers are removed you should inspect the belt for premature parting, severe cracks or missing teeth.

Specific to:

Mercury Villager 1993-2000

Nissan Quest 1993-2000

  1. Remove the timing belt covers.
  2.  
  3. Temporarily install the crankshaft pulley bolt. Using a wrench on the pulley bolt, rotate the engine clockwise until No. 1 cylinder is at TDC of the compression stroke. The timing mark on the crankshaft sprocket should be aligned with the timing mark on the oil pump housing. The timing marks on the camshaft sprockets should be aligned with the timing marks on the rear timing belt cover.
    NOTE
    If the belt is to be reinstalled, mark the direction of rotation on the belt to ensure proper installation.

  4.  
  5. Loosen the timing belt tensioner nut.
  6.  
  7. Remove the timing belt.
  8.  

To install:

  1. Inspect the camshaft and crankshaft timing sprockets for warping, chipping, damage or abnormal wear and replace them, if needed.
  2.  
  3. Make sure that the timing marks on the camshaft sprockets are aligned with the timing marks on the rear timing belt cover.
  4.  
  5. Make sure that the timing marks on the crankshaft sprocket and oil pump housing are still aligned.
  6.  
  7. Using an Allen wrench, turn the timing belt tensioner clockwise until the tensioner spring is fully extended. Temporarily tighten the timing belt tensioner nut to 32-43 ft. lbs. (43-58 Nm).
    NOTE
    If installing a new belt, make sure that the arrow on the belt is pointing away from the engine. In addition, a new original equipment manufacturer (OEM) belt will have three white marks which should align with the marks on the sprockets if properly installed. If installing the old belt, make sure that the belt is installed in the original direction of rotation.

  8.  
  9. Install the timing belt, starting at the crankshaft sprocket and working counterclockwise around the camshaft sprockets. Do not allow any slack in the belt between the sprockets. Slip the belt onto the timing belt tensioner.
  10.  
  11. While holding the timing belt tensioner in position with the Allen wrench, loosen the tensioner nut.
  12.  
  13. Slowly release the Allen wrench and let the timing belt tensioner apply pressure on the belt.
  14.  
  15. Using the Allen wrench, turn the timing belt tensioner 70-80° clockwise. Temporarily tighten the timing belt tensioner nut to 32-43 ft. lbs. (43-58 Nm).
  16.  
  17. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise twice, until No. 1 cylinder is at TDC of the compression stroke. All of the timing marks should be properly aligned.
  18.  
  19. Apply 22 lbs. (98 N) of force on the belt between the right (rear) camshaft sprocket and the tensioner.
    NOTE
    An assistant may be needed to help with the following timing belt adjustment.

  20.  
  21. Maintain pressure on the belt. Hold the tensioner in place with the Allen wrench and loosen the tensioner nut. Remove the Allen wrench.
  22.  
  23. Position a 0.0138 inch (.035mm) thick/0.500 inch (12.7mm) wide feeler gauge at the bottom of the tensioner flat against the belt.
  24.  
  25. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise until the feeler gauge is between the timing belt and tensioner.
  26.  
  27. Tighten the timing belt tensioner nut to 32-43 ft. lbs. (43-58 Nm).
  28.  
  29. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise to remove the feeler gauge from between the timing belt and the tensioner.
  30.  
  31. Continue rotating the crankshaft through almost two full revolutions, until No. 1 cylinder is at TDC of the compression stroke. All of the timing marks should be properly aligned.
  32.  
  33. Apply 22 lbs. (98 N) of force on the timing belt between the camshaft sprockets and measure the belt deflection. The belt should move 0.51-0.59 inch (13-15mm). If not, repeat the adjustment procedure and recheck the deflection. If it is still too loose, the belt will need to be replaced.
  34.  
  35. Install the timing belt covers.
  36.  
  37. Check the ignition timing and adjust, if necessary.

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    Fig. Timing belt aligning mark locations



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    Fig. Proper feeler gauge positioning for timing belt adjustment

  38.  

Specific to:

Mercury Villager 1993-2000

Nissan Quest 1993-2000


WARNING
Do not rotate the crankshaft or camshafts with the timing belt removed. Damage to the valves and/or pistons may result.



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Fig. Exploded view of the timing belt and related components

 
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