Renault Coupes/Sedans/Wagons 1975-1985 Repair Guide

Timing Belts

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INSPECTION





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Fig. Fig. 1 Do not bend, twist or turn the timing belt inside out. Never allow oil, water or steam to contact the belt



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Fig. Fig. 2 Check for premature parting of the belt



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Fig. Fig. 3 Check if the teeth are cracked or damaged



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Fig. Fig. 4 Inspect the timing belt for cracks, fraying, glazing or damage of any kind



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Fig. Fig. 5 Look for noticeable cracks or wear on the belt face



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Fig. Fig. 6 You may only have damage on one side of the belt; if so, the guide could be the culprit



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Fig. Fig. 7 Foreign materials can get in between the teeth and cause damage



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Fig. Fig. 8 Damage on only one side of the timing belt may indicate a faulty guide



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Fig. Fig. 9 ALWAYS replace the timing belt at the interval specified by the manufacturer

Inspect the belt for any visible signs of damage such as missing teeth, deep cracks or scores, or loose threads along the edges of the belt. Check that there is no oil or antifreeze leaking onto the belt, as this will soften the rubber compound and cause premature failure. As an average rule of thumb, the timing belt should be replaced every 60,000 miles (96,000 km). If the belt breaks while the engine is running, or the crankshaft and/or camshaft has been turned separately after the timing belt has been removed from the engine, the valves may strike the piston heads, and cause engine damage. If replacement is necessary, refer to and follow the procedures very closely.

 
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