Saturn Coupes/Sedans/Wagons 1991-1998 Repair Guide

Driven Disc and Pressure Plate

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REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 through 7

  1. Properly disable the SIR system, if equipped, and disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. Remove the transaxle from the vehicle.
  4.  
  5. Unsnap the release fork from the ball stud, then remove the fork and bearing from the vehicle. Slide the bearing from the fork. The bearing should be checked for excessive play and for minimal bearing drag. It should be replaced if no/little drag or excessive play is found.
  6.  

The release bearing is packed with grease and should not be washed with solvent.

  1. Using a feeler gauge, measure the distance between the pressure plate and flywheel surfaces in order to determine clutch face thickness. Replace the clutch disc if it is not within specification, 0.205-0.287 in. (5.2-7.3mm).
  2.  
  3. Remove the pressure plate-to-flywheel bolts in a progressive crisscross pattern to prevent warping the cover, then remove the pressure plate and clutch disc.
  4.  
  5. Inspect the pressure plate, as follows:
    1. Check for excessive wear, chatter marks, cracks or overheating (indicated by a blue discoloration). Black random spots on the friction surface of the pressure plate is normal.
    2.  
    3. Check the plate for warpage using a straightedge and a feeler gauge; the maximum allowable warpage is 0.006 in. (0.15mm).
    4.  
    5. Replace the plate, if necessary.
    6.  

  6.  
  7. Inspect the clutch disc, as follows:
    1. Check the disc face for oil or burnt spots.
    2.  
    3. Check the disc for loose damper springs, hub or rivets.
    4.  
    5. Replace the disc, if necessary.
    6.  

  8.  
  9. Check the flywheel, as follows:
    1. Check the ring gear for wear or damage.
    2.  
    3. Check the friction surface for excessive wear, chatter marks, cracks or overheating (indicated by a blue discoloration). Black random spots on the friction surface of the pressure plate is normal.
    4.  
    5. Check flywheel thickness; the minimum allowable is 1.102 in. (28mm).
    6.  
    7. Measure flywheel run-out using a dial indicator, positioned for at least 2 flywheel revolutions. Push the crankshaft forward to take up thrust bearing clearance. Maximum flywheel run-out is 0.006 in. (0.15mm).
    8.  
    9. Check the flywheel for warpage using a straightedge and a feeler gauge; the maximum allowable warpage is 0.006 in. (0.15mm).
    10.  
    11. Replace the flywheel, if necessary.
    12.  

  10.  
  11. If necessary, remove the flywheel retaining bolts and remove the flywheel from the crankshaft.
  12.  

To install:
  1. If removed, install the flywheel and tighten the bolts in a crisscross sequence to 59 ft. lbs. (80 Nm).
  2.  
  3. Install the clutch disc and pressure plate with the yellow dot on the pressure plate aligned as close as possible to the mark on the flywheel. The clutch disc is labeled FLYWHEEL SIDE in order to help correctly position the disc. Start the pressure plate bolts.
  4.  
  5. Install clutch alignment tool SA9145T or equivalent in the clutch disc, and push in until it bottoms out in the crankshaft.
  6.  
  7. Tighten the pressure plate bolts using multiple passes of a crisscross sequence to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm) and remove the alignment tool.
  8.  
  9. Lubricate the fork pivot point with high temperature grease and install the release bearing to the fork. Do not lubricate the release bearing or bearing quill.
  10.  
  11. Snap the release bearing and fork onto the ball stud.
  12.  
  13. Lubricate the splines of the input shaft lightly with a high temperature grease.
  14.  
  15. Install the transaxle assembly.
  16.  
  17. Connect the negative battery cable and, if equipped, properly enable the SIR system.
  18.  



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Fig. Fig. 1: Slide the bearing from the release fork



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Fig. Fig. 2: Check the pressure plate for warpage



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Fig. Fig. 3: Check the clutch disc for oil or burnt spots and check for loose springs, hub or rivets



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Fig. Fig. 4: Inspect the flywheel ring gear for damage and the contact surface for wear



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Fig. Fig. 5: Measure flywheel run-out using a dial indicator



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Fig. Fig. 6: If removed, install the flywheel and tighten the mounting bolts in a crisscross pattern to specifications



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Fig. Fig. 7: Install a proper clutch alignment tool before tightening the pressure plate retaining bolts

ADJUSTMENTS



Pedal Height/Travel Diagnosis

See Figures 8, 9 and 10

The hydraulic clutch system is self-adjusting; therefore, no manual clutch pedal adjustments are necessary or possible. However, because the pedal travel is directly related to the clutch fork travel, the operating condition of the hydraulic system may be checked using clutch pedal travel.

  1. Use a straightedge horizontally positioned from the center of the clutch pedal to the driver' seat, then depress the clutch pedal and measure pedal travel. The clutch pedal travel should be 5.3-6.2 in. (135-156mm). If the pedal travel is insufficient, look for an obvious cause, such as carpet or a floor mat blocking the pedal or a faulty/damaged pedal.
  2.  
  3. Through the access hole on the side of the transaxle (immediately to the right of the slave cylinder), use a caliper or depth gauge to measure travel of the clutch fork with the pedal in the full up and full down positions. Subtract the full down measurement from the full up figure to determine fork travel.
  4.  

If no caliper or depth gauge is available, use a round wire rod in the access hole and mark the pedal up/down positions. Then measure the distance between the 2 marks to determine fork travel.

  1. Compare the fork and pedal travel measurements using the chart.
  2.  
  3. If fork travel is less than the minimum allowable, check the following. (Conditions a, b and e require replacement of the master/slave cylinder assembly:
    1. Fluid leaks in the hydraulic system.
    2.  
    3. Air in the system.
    4.  
    5. Improper installation of the master/slave cylinder.
    6.  
    7. Damaged master or slave cylinder.
    8.  
    9. Damage to the front of the dashboard.
    10.  

  4.  
  5. If fork travel is acceptable and the hydraulics are working properly, check for a bent fork or damaged pressure plate, which may cause the improper pedal travel.
  6.  



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Fig. Fig. 8: Use a straightedge to measure pedal travel



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Fig. Fig. 9: An access hole is provided in the transaxle housing, in order to measure fork travel



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Fig. Fig. 10: Compare fork and pedal travel using the chart

 
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