Subaru Coupes/Sedans/Wagons 1985-1996 Repair Guide

Belts

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INSPECTION



See Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

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Fig. Fig. 1: There are typically 3 types of accessory drive belts found on vehicles today



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Fig. Fig. 2: An example of a healthy drive belt



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Fig. Fig. 3: Deep cracks in this belt will cause flex, building up heat that will eventually lead to belt failure



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Fig. Fig. 4: The cover of this belt is worn, exposing the critical reinforcing cords to excessive wear



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Fig. Fig. 5: Installing too wide a belt can result in serious belt wear and/or breakage

Belts should be inspected at 30,000 mile (48,300 km) intervals and replaced at 60,000 mile (96,500 km) intervals or at the first sign of deterioration.

Inspect belts for signs of glazing or cracking. A glazed belt will be perfectly smooth from slippage, while a good belt will have a slight texture of fabric visible. Cracks usually start at the inner edge of the belt and run outward. All worn or damaged drive belts should be replaced immediately. It is best to replace all drive belts at one time, as a preventive maintenance measure, during this service operation.

Proper drive belt tension adjustment is important, inadequate tension will result in slippage and wear, while excessive tension will damage the water pump and alternator bearings and cause the belt to fray and crack.

TENSION ADJUSTMENT



See Figures 6 and 7

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Fig. Fig. 6: Check the accessory belt tension by pressing and measuring the amount of deflection



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Fig. Fig. 7: Check the belt tension on 1.8L and 2.7L engines at the appropriate arrowed area, based on the number of pulleys

Front Side Belt
EXCEPT LEGACY AND SVX

See Figures 8 and 9

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Fig. Fig. 8: Loosen the retaining and bracket bolt, and move the alternator to adjust the belt tension-1.2L, 1.8L and 2.7L engines



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Fig. Fig. 9: Use a suitable prytool to tension the belt while tightening the bolt-1.6L engine shown

  1. Loosen the alternator mounting bolts.
  2.  
  3. Move the alternator to increase the tension, or decrease to reduce the belt tension.
  4.  
  5. Tighten the alternator mounting bolts.
  6.  

LEGACY AND SVX

See Figures 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14

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Fig. Fig. 10: Loosen and remove the belt cover retainer bolts-2.2L, 2.5L and 3.3L engines



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Fig. Fig. 11: Lift the belt cover off and place aside



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Fig. Fig. 12: Loosen the belt adjuster bolt



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Fig. Fig. 13: Loosen the adjuster bolt's lower clamp retainer bolt



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Fig. Fig. 14: Remove the belts from the pulleys

  1. Remove the drive belt cover over the belt by removing the retaining bolts at both ends of the bracket.
  2.  
  3. Loosen the locknut and adjust the slider bolt to obtain the correct belt tension.
  4.  
  5. Tighten the locknut.
  6.  
  7. When complete, install the drive belt cover.
  8.  

Rear Side Belt
EXCEPT LEGACY AND SVX

See Figure 15

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Fig. Fig. 15: Loosen the lockbolt below the belt and next to the pulley, then adjust the idler pulley to correct the belt tension

  1. Loosen the bolt and special nut securing the idler pulley.
  2.  
  3. Tighten or loosen the idler pulley to obtain the correct belt tension.
  4.  
  5. Tighten the bolt and special nut.
  6.  

LEGACY AND SVX

See Figure 16

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Fig. Fig. 16: Loosen the locknut and lockbolt, and rotate the pulley to adjust the belt tension

  1. Loosen both the lockbolt and locknut on the slider bracket.
  2.  
  3. Adjust the slider pulley forward or backwards to obtain the correct belt tension.
  4.  
  5. Tighten the lockbolt.
  6.