Suzuki Samurai/Sidekick/Tracker 1986-1998 Repair Guide

Evaporative Emission Controls

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OPERATION



The evaporative emission control system is designed to prevent to release of gasoline fumes, containing environmentally damaging unburned hydrocarbons, into the air. The system does this by storing the fuel vapors until the engine is started, at which time the vapors are vented into the incoming air charge to be burned by the engine. The system uses a container, known as the vapor storage container, filled with activated charcoal to trap the fuel vapors until needed.

Carbureted Engine

See Figure 1

On carbureted engines, the major evaporative emission control system components are the vapor storage container, the vent solenoid (mounted on the side of the carburetor), and the liquid vapor separator (mounted near the fuel tank). On these models, the (switch) vent solenoid controls when the fuel vapors are drawn out of the storage canister and into the air stream.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 1: Evaporative (EVAP) emission control system schematic-carbureted engines

1.3L TFI Engine

See Figure 2

On 1.3L TFI engines, the major evaporative emission control system components are the vapor storage canister, the Bi-metal Vacuum Switching Valve (BVSV), and the vapor liquid separator. The BVSV blocks the fuel vapor lines when the engine coolant is too cold, thereby preventing fuel vapors from being introduced to the air stream when the engine is not at normal operating temperature.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 2: Evaporative (EVAP) emission control system schematic-1.3L TFI engines

1.6L TFI Engine

See Figure 3

On 1.6L TFI engines, the major evaporative emission control system components are the vapor storage canister, the Canister Purge Vacuum Switching Valve (CP VSV), the 2-way check valve and the vapor liquid separator.

On newer models, the CP VSV is referred to as the EVAP Solenoid Purge Valve (EVAP SP Valve), and the 2-way check valve is known as the Tank Pressure Control (TPC) valve. The CP VSV and EVAP SP Valve function identically, only the name was changed. The 2-way check valve and TPC valve also function identically and perform the same job on the vehicle.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 3: EVAP system schematic used on 1.6L TFI engines

The CP VSV controls when the fuel vapors, stored in the vapor storage canister, are routed to the incoming air stream. The CP VSV is electronically controlled by the Engine Control Module (ECM), which controls the CP VSV based on engine conditions (such as engine temperature and speed).

The 2-way check valve is installed in the hose leading from the vapor liquid separator to the vapor storage canister. The valve is designed to maintain a constant pressure in the fuel tank. When the pressure in the fuel tank builds to a specified value, the check valve opens and allows the fuel vapors to flow to the storage canister. On the other hand, when the pressure in the fuel tank drops too low, the check valves opens to allow air to flow into the fuel tank to raise the dropping pressure.

1.6L and 1.8L MFI Engines

1.6L MFI engines are available with two different evaporative emission systems: EVAP I and EVAP II. EVAP I models include all 1592-95 models, 1596 4-door Sidekick and Tracker models, 1596 X-90 (except California with automatic transmission) models, and 1596 Sidekick Sport (1.8L engine) models. EVAP II models include 1596 2-door Sidekick and Tracker models, 1596 California X-90 models with automatic transmissions, and all 1597-98 models.

EVAP I MODELS

The major EVAP I emission control system components are the vapor storage canister, the EVAP Solenoid Purge (EVAP SP) valve, the Tank Pressure Control (TPC) valve and the vapor liquid separator.

The EVAP SP valve controls when the fuel vapors, stored in the vapor storage canister, are routed to the incoming air stream. The EVAP SP valve is electronically controlled by the Engine Control Module (ECM), which controls the EVAP SP valve based on engine conditions (such as engine temperature and speed).

The TPC valve is installed in the hose leading from the vapor liquid separator to the vapor storage canister. The valve is designed to maintain a constant pressure in the fuel tank. When the pressure in the fuel tank builds to a specified value, the check valve opens and allows the fuel vapors to flow to the storage canister. On the other hand, when the pressure in the fuel tank drops too low, the check valves opens to allow air to flow into the fuel tank to raise the dropping pressure.

EVAP II MODELS

The major EVAP II system, also referred to as the enhanced evaporative emission control system, components are the EVAP Canister Surge (EVAP CS) tank, the Fuel Tank Pressure Control (FTPC) valve, the Fuel Tank Pressure (FTP) sensor, the EVAP Canister Vent Solenoid (EVAP CVS), the EVAP Tank Pressure Control Solenoid Vacuum (EVAP TPCSV) valve, and the EVAP Canister Purge (EVAP CP) valve.

The EVAP II system functions in much the same manner as the EVAP I system, with the exception of a few added components to fine-tune EVAP system functioning. The additional components are the EVAP CVS, EVAP TPCSV valve, and FTP sensor.

The EVAP CVS and the FTP sensor are utilized so that the ECM can diagnose fuel vapor leakage from the EVAP II system. The EVAP CVS is usually open, but is closed by the ECM whenever it checks for leaks.

The FTP sensor is similar to the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor, in that it measures the difference between the air pressure (or vacuum) in the fuel tank and the atmospheric pressure. The ECM provides a 5 volt reference signal and a ground to the sensor. The sensor sends a voltage signal between 0.1 and 4.9 volts back to the ECM. When the fuel cap is removed from the fuel tank, the pressure in the fuel tank equalizes to atmospheric pressure, at which time the FTP sensor output signal voltage will range from 2.0 to 2.5 volts.

COMPONENT TESTING



Carbureted Engine

HOSES

Inspect all evaporative emission control system hoses for loose connections, leaks, clogs, and deterioration. Replace any faulty hoses with new ones.

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister testing procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

VENT SOLENOID
  1. Detach and label the vapor storage canister hose from the vent solenoid (mounted on the side of the carburetor).
  2.  
  3. Connect a new hose to the nipple on the solenoid.
  4.  
  5. With the ignition switch OFF , attempt to blow air through the hose connected to the vent solenoid. Air should pass freely through the solenoid.
  6.  
  7. Turn the ignition switch ON , but do not start the engine. Once again, attempt to blow air through the vent solenoid hose. Air should pass freely through the solenoid.
  8.  
  9. Start the engine, then blow air through the vent solenoid hose again. The air should not pass through the solenoid while the engine is running.
  10.  
  11. If the vent solenoid did not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  12.  
  13. Remove the new hose, connected to the solenoid, and reattach the old hose.
  14.  


CAUTION
NEVER suck air through the vent solenoid. Residual toxic gasoline fumes can be inhaled, which can cause severe internal injuries.

1.3L TFI Engine

HOSES

Inspect all evaporative emission control system hoses for loose connections, leaks, clogs, and deterioration. Replace any faulty hoses with new ones.

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister testing procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

BI-METAL VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (BVSV)

See Figures 4 and 5

This procedure can also be performed by removing the BVSV and warming it up in a pot of water on a stove.

  1. Allow the vehicle to sit, unused, overnight so that the engine is completely cold (below 91°F 55°C).
  2.  
  3. Disconnect and label the vacuum hoses from the BVSV.
  4.  
  5. Attach two new hoses to the BVSV nipples.
  6.  
  7. Blow through the hose attached to the upper BVSV nipple (3) and ensure that no air comes out of the end of the other hose (4).
  8.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 4: If removing the valve for testing, position it in a pot of cold water and attempt to blow air through the top nipple-no air should exit from the lower nipple



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 5: Heat the water up and recheck the valve by blowing through the upper nipple-air should now exit from the lower nozzle

  1. Start the engine and allow it to warm up (above 109°F/65°C).
  2.  
  3. Once again, blow through the hose attached to the upper BVSV nipple (3) and ensure that air does come out of the end of the other hose (4).
  4.  
  5. If the BVSV does not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  6.  
  7. Reattach the original vacuum hoses to the BVSV.
  8.  

1.6L TFI Engine

CANISTER PURGE FUNCTION

See Figure 6

Before commencing with this test procedure, ensure that there are no Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC's) indicating that any sensors are faulty, and that the engine is at normal operating temperature.

  1. Raise the vehicle and safely support it on jackstands so that the rear wheels may rotate freely.
  2.  
  3. Set the transmission in Neutral and the transfer case in 2H (2-wheel drive high).
  4.  
  5. Start the engine and ensure that the rear driveshaft or tires are rotating. If the tires or driveshaft are not rotating, perform the test with one rear tire locked in place and the other rear tire turned by hand.
  6.  


CAUTION
Do not change the transmission position from Neutral during this test, otherwise the rear wheels may spin at a high speed, which causes a dangerous condition.

  1. Start the engine and allow it to idle until normal operating temperature is reached. You know the engine has reached normal operating temperature when the upper radiator hose becomes warm to the touch.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 6: To test the canister purge function, detach the purge hose from the canister and check for vacuum

  1. Detach the purge hose from the canister. Position the tip of your finger against the disconnected end of the purge hose. With the engine idling, ensure that no vacuum is felt from the purge vacuum hose.
  2.  
  3. With your finger still over the disconnected end of the purge vacuum hose, increase engine speed to 1100 rpm or more; vacuum should be felt with the engine speed above 1100 rpm.
  4.  
  5. If vacuum from the purge hose did not function as indicated, check the vacuum passage, the vacuum hoses, the CP VSV, the wiring harness and the ECM for damage or blockages.
  6.  

VACUUM PASSAGE

See Figure 7

  1. Start the engine and allow it to run at idle.
  2.  
  3. Place the tip of one of your fingers over the open end of the vacuum nipple.
  4.  
  5. Ensure that vacuum is felt at the vacuum nipple.
  6.  
  7. If no vacuum is felt, clean the passage by blowing compressed air into the passage.
  8.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 7: Use your finger to check for vacuum at the vacuum passage in the intake manifold-if no vacuum is present, the passage is blocked

HOSES

Inspect all evaporative emission control system hoses for loose connections, leaks, clogs, and deterioration. Replace any faulty hoses with new ones.

CANISTER PURGE VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (CP VSV)

See Figures 8, 9 and 10


CAUTION
NEVER suck air through the CP VSV. Residual toxic gasoline fumes may be inhaled, which can cause severe internal injuries.

On newer models, the CP VSV is referred to as the EVAP Solenoid Purge Valve (EVAP SP Valve).

  1. With the ignition switch OFF , detach the wiring harness connector from the CP VSV.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 8: Measure the resistance between the two VSV terminals-if the resistance is not within the specified range, replace it with a new one



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 9: With the wiring harness disengaged from the CP VSV, attempt to blow air through hose A-no air should exit from hose B



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 10: Apply 8 volts DC current to the CP VSV terminals and once again attempt to blow air through hose A-air should now exit from hose B

  1. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between the two CP VSV terminals. Resistance should be 30-38 ohms. If the resistance of the CP VSV is not as specified, replace it with a new one.
  2.  
  3. Detach the CP VSV vacuum hoses from the intake manifold and the vapor storage canister.
  4.  
  5. With the wiring harness connector still detached from the CP VSV, attempt to blow air through the CP VSV as indicated in the accompanying illustration. Air should not pass through the valve.
  6.  
  7. Connect a 8 volt battery to the two CP VSV wiring harness terminal, then attempt to blow air through the valve again. Air should pass freely through the valve while it is energized.
  8.  
  9. If the valve does not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  10.  
  11. Reattach the CP VSV vacuum lines and wiring harness connector.
  12.  

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister testing procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

2-WAY CHECK VALVE

See Figure 11


CAUTION
NEVER suck air through the 2-way check valve. Residual toxic gasoline fumes may be inhaled, which can cause severe internal injuries.

On newer models, the 2-way check valve is known as the Tank Pressure Control (TPC) valve.

  1. Remove the 2-way check valve, which is installed on the fuel tank.
  2.  
  3. Attach two new vacuum hoses to the check valve.
  4.  
  5. Blow air through the check valve from the black side to the orange side. Air should pass only when blowing hard.
  6.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 11: Air should pass through the 2-way check valve from the fuel tank side only when blowing hard

  1. Blow air through the valve from the orange side to the black side. Air should pass freely through the valve in this direction even when blowing softly.
  2.  
  3. If air does not pass through the check valve as indicated, replace the valve with a new one.
  4.  
  5. Reinstall the check valve.
  6.  

1.6L and 1.8L MFI EVAP I Engines

CANISTER PURGE FUNCTION

See Figure 6

Before commencing with this test procedure, ensure that there are no Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC's) indicating that any sensors are faulty, and that the engine is at normal operating temperature.

  1. Raise the vehicle and safely support it on jackstands so that the rear wheels may rotate freely.
  2.  
  3. Set the transmission in Neutral and the transfer case in 2H (2-wheel drive high).
  4.  
  5. Start the engine and ensure that the rear driveshaft or tires are rotating. If the tires or driveshaft are not rotating, perform the test with one rear tire locked in place and the other rear tire turned by hand.
  6.  


CAUTION
Do not change the transmission position from Neutral during this test, otherwise the rear wheels may spin at a high speed, which causes a dangerous condition.

  1. Start the engine and allow it to idle until normal operating temperature is reached. You know the engine has reached normal operating temperature when the upper radiator hose becomes warm to the touch.
  2.  
  3. Detach the purge hose from the canister. Position the tip of your finger against the disconnected end of the purge hose. With the engine idling, ensure that no vacuum is felt from the purge vacuum hose.
  4.  
  5. With your finger still over the disconnected end of the purge vacuum hose, increase engine speed to 1100 rpm or more; vacuum should be felt with the engine speed above 1100 rpm.
  6.  
  7. If vacuum from the purge hose did not function as indicated, check the vacuum passage, the vacuum hoses, the EVAP SP valve, the wiring harness and the ECM for damage or blockages.
  8.  

VACUUM PASSAGE

See Figure 7

  1. Start the engine and allow it to run at idle.
  2.  
  3. Place the tip of one of your fingers over the open end of the vacuum nipple.
  4.  
  5. Ensure that vacuum is felt at the vacuum nipple.
  6.  
  7. If no vacuum is felt, clean the passage by blowing compressed air into the passage.
  8.  

HOSES

Inspect all evaporative emission control system hoses for loose connections, leaks, clogs, and deterioration. Replace any faulty hoses with new ones.

EVAPORATIVE SOLENOID PURGE (EVAP SP) VALVE

See Figures 8, 9 and 10

  1. With the ignitions witch OFF , detach the wiring harness connector from the EVAP SP valve.
  2.  
  3. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between the two EVAP SP valve terminals. Resistance should be 28-36 ohms. If the resistance of the EVAP SP valve is not as specified, replace it with a new one.
  4.  
  5. Detach the EVAP SP valve vacuum hoses from the intake manifold and the vapor storage canister.
  6.  
  7. With the wiring harness connector still detached from the EVAP SP valve, attempt to blow air through the EVAP SP valve as indicated in the accompanying illustration. Air should not pass through the valve.
  8.  
  9. Connect a 8 volt battery to the two EVAP SP valve wiring harness terminal, then attempt to blow air through the valve again. Air should pass freely through the valve while it is energized.
  10.  
  11. If the valve does not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  12.  
  13. Reattach the EVAP SP valve vacuum lines and wiring harness connector.
  14.  


CAUTION
NEVER suck air through the EVAP SP valve. Residual toxic gasoline fumes may be inhaled, which can cause severe internal injuries.

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister testing procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

TANK PRESSURE CONTROL (TPC) VALVE

See Figure 11

  1. Remove the TPC valve, which is installed on the fuel tank.
  2.  
  3. Attach two new vacuum hoses to the check valve.
  4.  
  5. Blow air through the check valve from the black side to the orange side. Air should pass only when blowing hard.
  6.  
  7. Blow air through the valve from the orange side to the black side. Air should pass freely through the valve in this direction even when blowing softly.
  8.  
  9. If air does not pass through the check valve as indicated, replace the valve with a new one.
  10.  
  11. Reinstall the check valve.
  12.  


CAUTION
NEVER suck air through the TPC valve. Residual toxic gasoline fumes may be inhaled, which can cause severe internal injuries.

1.6L and 1.8L MFI EVAP II Engines

EVAP II CANISTER PURGE SYSTEM INSPECTION
  1. Allow the engine to cool down to room temperature.
  2.  
  3. Start the engine.
  4.  
  5. Disconnect the purge hose from the vapor storage canister.
  6.  
  7. Position a finger tip against the disconnected end of the purge hose, and check for vacuum. Vacuum should not be felt when the engine is below normal operating temperature.
  8.  
  9. Connect the purge hose to the canister and allow the engine to warm up to normal operating temperature.
  10.  
  11. Once again, disconnect the purge hose from the vapor storage canister.
  12.  
  13. Check the purge hose for vacuum again. Vacuum should now be felt.
  14.  

The EVAP II system does not purge the canister unless the engine is sufficiently warmed up and the heated oxygen sensor is fully activated. When the purge hose is disconnected in Step 6, some air may be pulled into the purge line. As a result, the ECM may detect a change in the purge gas concentration and stop purging the system. This is normal, and may be the cause of a failure to detect vacuum in Step 7. If no vacuum is evident in Step 7, continue testing the EVAP II system components to avoid replacing a good component.

  1. If vacuum from the purge hose did not function as indicated, inspection of the EVAP II system is necessary.
  2.  

HOSES

Inspect all evaporative emission control system hoses for loose connections, leaks, clogs, and deterioration. Replace any faulty hoses with new ones.

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister testing procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

EVAP CANISTER PURGE (EVAP CP) VALVE

See Figure 12

  1. With the ignition switch OFF , detach the wiring harness connector from the EVAP CP valve.
  2.  
  3. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between the two EVAP CP valve terminals. Resistance should be 28-36 ohms at 68°F (20°C). If the resistance of the EVAP CP valve is not as specified, replace it with a new one.
  4.  
  5. Detach the EVAP CP valve vacuum hoses from the intake manifold and the vapor storage canister.
  6.  
  7. With the wiring harness connector still detached from the EVAP CP valve, attempt to blow air through the EVAP CP valve as indicated in the accompanying illustration. Air should not pass through the valve.
  8.  


CAUTION
NEVER suck air through the EVAP CP valve. Residual toxic gasoline fumes may be inhaled, which can cause severe internal injuries.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 12: EVAP CP valve hose identification

  1. Connect a 8 volt DC battery to the two EVAP CP valve wiring harness terminal, then attempt to blow air through the valve again. Air should pass freely through the valve while it is energized.
  2.  
  3. If the valve does not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  4.  
  5. Reattach the EVAP CP valve vacuum lines and wiring harness connector.
  6.  

EVAP CANISTER VENT SOLENOID (EVAP CVS)

See Figure 13


CAUTION
NEVER suck air through the EVAP CVS. Residual toxic gasoline fumes may be inhaled, which can cause severe internal injuries.

  1. With the ignition switch OFF , detach the wiring harness connector from the EVAP CVS.
  2.  
  3. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between the two EVAP CVS terminals. Resistance should be 25-30 ohms at 68°F (20°C). If the resistance of the EVAP CVS is not as specified, replace it with a new one.
  4.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 13: When the EVAP CVS is not energized, the air blown into the valve should exit through the side hose-when the valve is energized, the air should not exit through the other hose

  1. Detach the EVAP CVS vacuum hoses from the intake manifold and the vapor storage canister.
  2.  
  3. With the wiring harness connector still detached from the EVAP CVS, attempt to blow air through the EVAP CVS as indicated in the accompanying illustration. Air should pass freely through the valve.
  4.  
  5. Connect a 8 volt DC battery to the two EVAP CVS wiring harness terminal, then attempt to blow air through the solenoid again. Air should not pass freely through the solenoid while it is energized.
  6.  
  7. If the valve does not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  8.  
  9. Reattach the EVAP CVS vacuum lines and wiring harness connector.
  10.  

EVAP TANK PRESSURE CONTROL SOLENOID VACUUM (EVAP TPCSV) VALVE

See Figure 14


CAUTION
NEVER suck air through the EVAP TPCSV valve. Residual toxic gasoline fumes may be inhaled, which can cause severe internal injuries.

  1. With the ignitions witch OFF , detach the wiring harness connector from the EVAP TPCSV valve.
  2.  
  3. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between the two EVAP TPCSV valve terminals. Resistance should be 28-36 ohms at 68°F (20°C). If the resistance of the EVAP TPCSV valve is not as specified, replace it with a new one.
  4.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 14: When the EVAP TPCSV is not energized, the air blown into the valve should exit through the filter-when the valve is energized, the air should exit through the other hose

  1. Detach the EVAP TPCSV valve vacuum hoses from the intake manifold and the vapor storage canister.
  2.  
  3. With the wiring harness connector still detached from the EVAP TPCSV valve, attempt to blow air through the EVAP TPCSV valve as indicated in the accompanying illustration. Air should not pass through the valve.
  4.  
  5. Connect a 8 volt DC battery to the two EVAP TPCSV valve wiring harness terminal, then attempt to blow air through the valve again. Air should pass freely through the valve while it is energized.
  6.  
  7. If the valve does not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  8.  
  9. Reattach the EVAP TPCSV valve vacuum lines and wiring harness connector.
  10.  

TANK PRESSURE CONTROL (TPC) VALVE

See Figure 15

  1. Attach a long piece of new vacuum hose to the TPC valve nipple marked TANK.
  2.  
  3. Blow hard into the vacuum hose. Air should pass SLOWLY through the valve and out the port marked CAN.
  4.  
  5. Remove the vacuum hose from the TANK nipple, and connect it to the CAN port of the TPC valve.
  6.  
  7. Blow lightly through the vacuum hose. Air should pass freely through the valve and out the TANK nipple.
  8.  
  9. If the TPC valve did not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  10.  
  11. Reattach the vacuum hose to the TANK port on the TPC valve.
  12.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 15: Cross-sectional view of the TPC valve-nozzle 2 is marked TANK, and nozzle 3 is marked CAN

  1. Using a hand-held vacuum pump, apply vacuum to the vacuum port of the TPC valve.
  2.  
  3. With vacuum applied to the TPC valve, blow through the vacuum hose. Air should pass easily through the valve and out the CAN port of the TPC valve.
  4.  
  5. If the TPC valve did not function as indicated, replace it with a new one.
  6.  

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



1.3L Carbureted Engine
VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister removal and installation procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

VENT SOLENOID
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. If necessary, remove the carburetor from the vehicle.
  4.  
  5. Detach and label the vent solenoid wiring connector.
  6.  
  7. Remove the solenoid-to-carburetor mounting bolts and washers.
  8.  
  9. Carefully pull the vent solenoid off of the carburetor.
  10.  
  11. Remove and discard the old gasket.
  12.  

To install:
  1. Along with a new gasket, position the vent solenoid against the carburetor.
  2.  
  3. Install the vent solenoid mounting bolts and washers. Tighten them until snug.
  4.  
  5. Reattach the solenoid wiring harness connector.
  6.  
  7. If applicable, install the carburetor.
  8.  
  9. Connect the negative battery cable.
  10.  

1.3L TFI Engine

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister removal and installation procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

BI-METAL VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (BVSV)
  1. Drain the engine cooling system until the coolant level is below the BVSV, mounted in the intake manifold.
  2.  
  3. Detach and label the vacuum lines from the BVSV.
  4.  
  5. Using an open end wrench, loosen the BVSV, then remove it from the intake manifold.
  6.  

To install:
  1. If the old BVSV is to be installed, clean the threads thoroughly.
  2.  
  3. Wrap Teflon® sealing tape around the BVSV threads, then install it by hand.
  4.  
  5. Tighten the BVSV until secure, then reattach the vacuum lines.
  6.  
  7. Fill the cooling system.
  8.  

1.6L TFI Engine

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister removal and installation procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

CANISTER PURGE VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (CP VSV)
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. Detach and label the wiring harness connector from the CP VSV.
  4.  
  5. Disconnect and label the vacuum lines from the CP VSV.
  6.  
  7. Loosen the CP VSV mounting bracket fasteners, then remove the valve from the intake manifold.
  8.  

To install:
  1. Position the CP VSV on the intake manifold, and install the mounting fasteners until secure.
  2.  
  3. Reattach the vacuum hoses to the CP VSV.
  4.  
  5. Insert the wiring harness connector in the CP VSV until the retaining latch is fully engaged.
  6.  
  7. Connect the negative battery cable.
  8.  

2-WAY CHECK VALVE
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. If necessary for added accessibility, lower the fuel tank from the vehicle.
  4.  
  5. Remove the hose clamps and detach the vapor hoses from the 2-way check valve.
  6.  
  7. Remove the check valve from the vehicle.
  8.  

To install:
  1. Install the check valve in position and reattach the vapor hoses to it.
  2.  
  3. Install the vapor hose clamps and tighten them until snug.
  4.  
  5. If necessary, install the fuel tank.
  6.  
  7. Install the negative battery cable.
  8.  

1.6L and 1.8L MFI EVAP I Engines

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister removal and installation procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

EVAPORATIVE SOLENOID PURGE (EVAP SP) VALVE
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. Detach and label the wiring harness connector from the EVAP SP valve.
  4.  
  5. Disconnect and label the vacuum lines from the EVAP SP valve.
  6.  
  7. Loosen the EVAP SP valve mounting bracket fasteners, then remove the valve from the intake manifold.
  8.  

To install:
  1. Position the EVAP SP valve on the intake manifold, and install the mounting fasteners until secure.
  2.  
  3. Reattach the vacuum hoses to the EVAP SP valve.
  4.  
  5. Insert the wiring harness connector in the EVAP SP valve until the retaining latch is fully engaged.
  6.  
  7. Connect the negative battery cable.
  8.  

TANK PRESSURE CONTROL (TPC) VALVE
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. If necessary for added accessibility, lower the fuel tank from the vehicle.
  4.  
  5. Remove the hose clamps and detach the vapor hoses from the TPC valve.
  6.  
  7. Remove the check valve from the vehicle.
  8.  

To install:
  1. Install the check valve in position and reattach the vapor hoses to it.
  2.  
  3. Install the vapor hose clamps and tighten them until snug.
  4.  
  5. If necessary, install the fuel tank.
  6.  
  7. Install the negative battery cable.
  8.  

1.6L and 1.8L MFI EVAP II Engines

VAPOR STORAGE CANISTER

The vapor storage canister removal and installation procedure is presented in General Information & Maintenance of this guide.

EVAP CVS, EVAP TPCSV, AND EVAP CP VALVES
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. Detach and label the wiring harness connector from the valve/solenoid.
  4.  
  5. Disconnect and label the vacuum lines from the valve/solenoid.
  6.  
  7. Loosen the mounting bracket fasteners, then remove the component from the intake manifold (EVAP CVS) or from the right-hand inner fenderwell (EVAP TPCSV and EVAP CP).
  8.  

To install:
  1. Position the component on the intake manifold, or right-hand inner fenderwell, and install the mounting fasteners until secure.
  2.  
  3. Reattach the vacuum hoses to the component.
  4.  
  5. Insert the wiring harness connector in the valve/solenoid until the retaining latch is fully engaged.
  6.  
  7. Connect the negative battery cable.
  8.  

TANK PRESSURE CONTROL (TPC) VALVE
  1. Remove the hose clamps and detach the vapor hoses from the TPC valve, mounted next to the vapor storage canister.
  2.  
  3. Remove the valve from the engine compartment.
  4.  

To install:
  1. Install the valve in position and reattach the vapor hoses to it.
  2.  
  3. Install the vapor hose clamps and tighten them until snug.
  4.  

FUEL TANK PRESSURE (FTP) SENSOR
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. Remove the fuel tank from the vehicle.
  4.  
  5. Detach and label the FTP sensor wiring harness connector.
  6.  
  7. Loosen the two mounting bolts, then lift the sensor off of the fuel tank.
  8.  

To install:
  1. Install the FTP sensor on the fuel tank so that the wiring harness connector terminals face the fuel level sensor.
  2.  
  3. Install the two mounting bolts, and tighten then to 7-14 inch lbs. (1.2-2.0 Nm).
  4.  
  5. Reattach the wiring harness connector to the sensor. Ensure that the connector is fully engaged to the sensor.
  6.  
  7. Install the fuel tank in the vehicle.
  8.  
  9. Connect the negative battery cable.
  10.  

 
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