Toyota Camry 1983-1996 Repair Guide

Exhaust Gas Recirculation System

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OPERATION



The EGR system reduces oxides of nitrogen. This is accomplished by recirculating some of the exhaust gases through the EGR valve to the intake manifold, lowering peak combustion temperatures.

TESTING



1C-LTC and 2CL-TC Engines
SYSTEM CHECK

See Figure 1



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 1: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system components-1C-LTC and 2CL-TC engines

  1. Using a tee (3-way connector), connect a vacuum gauge to the hose between the EGR valve and the vacuum damper.
  2.  
  3. Check the seating of the EGR valve by starting the engine and seeing that it runs at a smooth idle. If the valve is not completely closed, the idle will be rough.
  4.  
  5. With the engine coolant temperature below 122°F (50°C), the vacuum gauge should read 0 at 2300 rpm. This indicates that the Bimetal Vacuum Switching Valve (BVSV) is functioning correctly at this temperature range.
  6.  
  7. Warm the engine to full operating temperature. Check that the vacuum gauge indicates below 1.97 in. Hg (6.7 kPa) at idle.
  8.  
  9. Check the vacuum gauge indicates above 11.02 in Hg (37.3 kPa) at 2300 rpm.
  10.  
  11. Increase the engine to 3500 rpm.
  12.  
  13. Chgeck that the gauge indication decreases to below 1.97 in. Hg (6.7 kPa).
  14.  
  15. Disconnect the vacuum gage and reconnect the vacuum hose to proper location.
  16.  
  17. If no problem is found with this inspection, the system is OK; otherwise inspect each part.
  18.  

BI-METAL VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (BVSV)
  1. Drain the coolant from the radiator into a suitable container.
  2.  
  3. Remove the BVSV.
  4.  
  5. Cool the BVSV in water below 122°F (50° C).
  6.  
  7. Blow air into the upper pipe and check that the BVSV is closed.
  8.  
  9. Heat the valve in water above 147° F (64° C).
  10.  
  11. Blow air into the upper pipe and check that the BVSV is open.
  12.  
  13. Apply liquid sealer to the first few threads of the valve and reinstall it in the engine.
  14.  
  15. Fill the radiator with coolant and water mixture. Start the engine and check for leaks.
  16.  
  17. If a problem is found with the testing of the BVSV, replace the valve.
  18.  

EGR VALVE
  1. Remove the EGR valve.
  2.  
  3. Check the valve for sticking and heavy carbon deposits. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
  4.  
  5. Reinstall the EGR valve with a new gasket.
  6.  

EGR VACUUM PUMP
  1. Check the output vacuum with a gauge, connect the unit to the outlet pipe.
  2.  
  3. Warm the engine and check that the vacuum gauge indicates above 25.59 in. Hg (86.7 kPa).
  4.  
  5. If a problem is found, repair the vacuum pump.
  6.  

HIGH ALTITUDE COMPENSATORY (HAC) VALVE

For all engines sold in areas over 4000 ft. in altitude, a system has been installed to automatically lean out the fuel mixture by supplying additional air. The valve is designed to maintain vacuum from the vacuum pump at a constant value regardless of atmospheric pressure. This also results in lower emissions. Low atmospheric pressure allows the bellows in the system to expand the close a port allowing more air to enter from demerit sources. All parts In this system must be replaced. The only adjustment available is in the timing. To inspect the HAC valve operation, proceed as follows:

  1. Connect a vacuum gauge to the outlet pipe.
  2.  
  3. Start the engine and check that the gauge indicates above 11.81 in. Hg. (4. kPa). in the low altitude position.
  4.  
  5. If a problem is found, replace the HAC valve.
  6.  

ELECTRONIC VACUUM RECURILATION (EVRV) VALVE

The EVRV is controlled by the computer. When the EVRV is off, air is led into the EGR valve diaphragm through its air filter and the EGR valve close the port so that the exhaust gas is not recalculated. When the EVRV is on, the computer controls the EVRV to maintain vacuum to the EGR valve diaphragm at optimum value by mixing air t constant volume from the HAC valve.

  1. Check for a short using an ohmmeter. Make sure there is not continuity between the terminals and the EVRV body. If the there is, replace the valve.
  2.  
  3. Check for an open circuit using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between the terminals of the EVRV. Resistance should be 11-13 ohms at 68°F (20°C.
  4.  
  5. If the resistance is not within specifications, replace the EVRV.
  6.  

THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR

See Figures 2 and 3

  1. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance between the Vc and E2 terminals. The resistance should be between 1-7 kilo ohms at 68°F (20° C).
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 2: Measure the resistance between terminals E2 and Vc of the throttle position sensor-1C-LTC and 2CL-TC engines

  1. Check the decrease in resistance between the Va and E2 terminals when the throttle lever is moved from the closed to the open position.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 3: Check for decreasing resistance between terminals E2 and Va of the throttle position sensor when it is moved from closed to open-1C-LTC and 2CL-TC engines

2SE-LC and 3S-FE Engines
SYSTEM CHECK

See Figure 4



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 4: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system components-3S-FE engine shown, 2SE-LC similar

  1. Check and clean the filter in the EGR vacuum modulator. Use compressed air (if possible) to blow the dirt out of the filters and check the filters for contamination or damage.
  2.  
  3. Using a tee (3-way connector), connect a vacuum gauge to the hose between the EGR valve and the vacuum modulator.
  4.  
  5. Check the seating of the EGR valve by starting the engine and seeing that it runs at a smooth idle. If the valve is not completely closed, the idle will be rough.
  6.  
  7. With the engine coolant temperature below 113°F (45°C), the vacuum gauge should read 0 at 2500 rpm. This indicates that the Bimetal Vacuum Switching Valve (BVSV) is functioning correctly at this temperature range.
  8.  
  9. Warm the engine to normal operating temperature. Check the vacuum gauge and confirm low vacuum at 2500 rpm.
  10.  
  11. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the R port on the EGR vacuum modulator and, using another piece of hose, connect the R port directly to the intake manifold. Check that the vacuum gauge indicates high vacuum at 2500 rpm.
  12.  

Port R is the lower of the two ports. As a large amount of exhaust gas enters, the engine will misfire slightly at this time.

  1. Disconnect the vacuum gauge and reconnect the vacuum hoses to their proper locations.
  2.  
  3. Check the EGR valve by applying vacuum directly to the valve with the engine at idle. (This may be accomplished either by bridging vacuum directly from the intake manifold or by using a hand-held vacuum pump.) The engine should falter and die as the full load of recalculated gasses enters the engine.
  4.  
  5. If no problem is found with this inspection, the system is OK; otherwise inspect each part.
  6.  

EGR VALVE
  1. Remove the EGR valve.
  2.  
  3. Check the valve for sticking and heavy carbon deposits. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
  4.  
  5. Reinstall the EGR valve with a new gasket.
  6.  

EGR VACUUM MODULATOR

See Figure 5

  1. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from ports P , Q , and R of the EGR vacuum modulator.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 5: Exploded view of the EGR vacuum modulator

  1. Plug the P and R ports with your fingers.
  2.  
  3. Blow air into port Q . Check that the air passes freely through the sides of the air filter.
  4.  

Port P is the single port on the one side of the modulator. Port Q and R are stacked, with port Q being on top.

  1. Start the engine and maintain 2500 rpm.
  2.  
  3. Repeat the test above. Check that there is a strong resistance to air flow.
  4.  
  5. Reconnect the vacuum hoses to the proper locations.
  6.  

BI-METAL VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (BVSV)

See Figures 6 and 7

  1. Drain the coolant from the radiator into a suitable container.
  2.  
  3. Remove the BVSV.
  4.  
  5. Cool the BVSV in water below 113°F (45° C).
  6.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 6: Blow air into the lower pipe (J) and check for flow from the filter

  1. Blow air into the lower pipe and check that air flows from the air filter in the BVSV.
  2.  
  3. Heat the valve in water above 151° F (66° C).
  4.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 7: With the coolant sensor heated up, blow air into the J pipe and watch for flow from the upper pipe and filter

  1. Blow air into the lower pipe and check that it flows out of the upper pipe and the air filter.
  2.  
  3. Apply liquid sealer to the first few threads of the valve and reinstall it in the engine.
  4.  
  5. Fill the radiator with coolant and water mixture. Start the engine and check for leaks.
  6.  
  7. If a problem is found with the testing of the BVSV, replace the valve.
  8.  

2VZ-FE Engine
SYSTEM CHECK

See Figure 8



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 8: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system components-2VZ-FE engine

  1. Check and clean the filter in the EGR vacuum modulator. Use compressed air (if possible) to blow the dirt out of the filters and check the filters for contamination or damage.
  2.  
  3. Using a tee (3-way connector), connect a vacuum gauge to the hose between the EGR valve and the vacuum modulator.
  4.  
  5. Check the seating of the EGR valve by starting the engine and seeing that it runs at a smooth idle. If the valve is not completely closed, the idle will be rough.
  6.  
  7. With the engine coolant temperature below 104°F (40°C), the vacuum gauge should read 0 at 2500 rpm. This indicates that the Bimetal Vacuum Switching Valve (BVSV) is functioning correctly at this temperature range.
  8.  
  9. Warm the engine to normal operating temperature. Check the vacuum gauge and confirm low vacuum at 2500 rpm.
  10.  
  11. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the R port on the EGR vacuum modulator and, using another piece of hose, connect the R port directly to the intake manifold. Check that the vacuum gauge indicates high vacuum at 3500 rpm.
  12.  

Port R is the lower of the two ports. As a large amount of exhaust gas enters, the engine will misfire slightly at this time.

  1. Disconnect the vacuum gauge and reconnect the vacuum hoses to their proper locations.
  2.  
  3. Check the EGR valve by applying vacuum directly to the valve with the engine at idle. (This may be accomplished either by bridging vacuum directly from the intake manifold or by using a hand-held vacuum pump.) The engine should falter and die as the full load of recalculated gasses enters the engine.
  4.  
  5. If no problem is found with this inspection, the system is OK; otherwise inspect each part.
  6.  

EGR VALVE
  1. Remove the EGR valve.
  2.  
  3. Check the valve for sticking and heavy carbon deposits. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
  4.  
  5. Reinstall the EGR valve with a new gasket.
  6.  

EGR VACUUM MODULATOR

See Figure 9

  1. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from ports P , Q , and R of the EGR vacuum modulator.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 9: Inspecting the EGR vacuum modulator with the engine stopped

  1. Plug the P and R ports with your fingers.
  2.  
  3. Blow air into port Q . Check that the air passes freely through the sides of the air filter.
  4.  

Port P is the single port on the one side of the modulator. Port Q and R are stacked, with port Q being on top.

  1. Start the engine and maintain 3500 rpm.
  2.  
  3. Repeat the test above. Check that there is a strong resistance to air flow.
  4.  
  5. Reconnect the vacuum hoses to the proper locations.
  6.  

BI-METAL VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (BVSV)

See Figures 10 and 11

  1. Drain the coolant from the radiator into a suitable container.
  2.  
  3. Remove the BVSV.
  4.  
  5. Cool the BVSV in water below 113°F (45° C).
  6.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 10: Blow air into the lower pipe (J) and check for flow from the filter

  1. Blow air into the lower pipe and check that air flows from the air filter in the BVSV.
  2.  
  3. Heat the valve in water above 151° F (66° C).
  4.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 11: With the coolant sensor heated up, blow air into the J pipe and watch for flow from the upper pipe and filter

  1. Blow air into the lower pipe and check that it flows out of the upper pipe and the air filter.
  2.  
  3. Apply liquid sealer to the first few threads of the valve and reinstall it in the engine.
  4.  
  5. Fill the radiator with coolant and water mixture. Start the engine and check for leaks.
  6.  
  7. If a problem is found with the testing of the BVSV, replace the valve.
  8.  

3VZ-FE Engine
SYSTEM CHECK

See Figure 12



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 12: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system components found on 3VZ-FE engines

  1. Check and clean the filter in the EGR vacuum modulator. Use compressed air (if possible) to blow the dirt out of the filters and check the filters for contamination or damage.
  2.  
  3. Using a tee (3-way connector), connect a vacuum gauge to the hose between the EGR valve and the vacuum modulator.
  4.  
  5. Check the seating of the EGR valve by starting the engine and seeing that it runs at a smooth idle. If the valve is not completely closed, the idle will be rough.
  6.  
  7. Inspect the Thermal Vacuum Valve (TVV) with the engine coolant temperature below 95°F (35°C), the vacuum gauge should read 0 at 2500 rpm.
  8.  
  9. Warm the engine to normal operating temperature. Check the vacuum gauge and confirm low vacuum at 2500 rpm.
  10.  
  11. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the R port on the EGR vacuum modulator and, using another piece of hose, connect the R port directly to the intake manifold. Check that the vacuum gauge indicates high vacuum at 3500 rpm.
  12.  

Port R is the lower of the two ports. As a large amount of exhaust gas enters, the engine will misfire slightly at this time.

  1. Disconnect the vacuum gauge and reconnect the vacuum hoses to their proper locations.
  2.  
  3. Check the EGR valve by applying vacuum directly to the valve with the engine at idle. (This may be accomplished either by bridging vacuum directly from the intake manifold or by using a hand-held vacuum pump.) The engine should falter and die as the full load of recalculated gasses enters the engine.
  4.  
  5. If no problem is found with this inspection, the system is OK; otherwise inspect each part.
  6.  

EGR VALVE
  1. Remove the EGR valve.
  2.  
  3. Check the valve for sticking and heavy carbon deposits. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
  4.  
  5. Reinstall the EGR valve with a new gasket.
  6.  

EGR VACUUM MODULATOR

See Figure 9

  1. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from ports P , Q , and R of the EGR vacuum modulator.
  2.  
  3. Plug the P and R ports with your fingers.
  4.  
  5. Blow air into port Q . Check that the air passes freely through the sides of the air filter.
  6.  

Port P is the single port on the one side of the modulator. Port Q and R are stacked, with port Q being on top.

  1. Start the engine and maintain 3500 rpms.
  2.  
  3. Repeat the test above. Check that there is a strong resistance to air flow.
  4.  
  5. Reconnect the vacuum hoses to the proper locations.
  6.  

5S-FE Engine
SYSTEM CHECK

See Figures 13 and 14

  1. Check and clean the filter in the EGR vacuum modulator. Use compressed air (if possible) to blow the dirt out of the filters and check the filters for contamination or damage.
  2.  
  3. Using a tee (3-way connector), connect a vacuum gauge to the hose between the EGR valve and the vacuum modulator.
  4.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 13: Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system components-5S-FE engine

  1. Check the seating of the EGR valve by starting the engine and seeing that it runs at a smooth idle. If the valve is not completely closed, the idle will be rough.
  2.  

The check connector is located near the air cleaner.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 14: Connect terminals TE1 and E1 in the data link connector

  1. Connect terminals TE 1 and E 1 in the check connector.
  2.  
  3. Inspect VSV and EGR vacuum modulator operation with hot engine. With the engine coolant temperature above 140°F (60°C) on AT and 131°F (55°C) on MT, check the vacuum gauge and confirm 0 vacuum at 2500 rpm.
  4.  
  5. Warm the engine up and check that the vacuum gauge indicates low vacuum at 2500 rpm.
  6.  
  7. Disconnect the hose from port R of the EGR vacuum modulator and connect port R directly to the intake manifold with another hose. Check the vacuum and make sure the reading is high at 2500 rpm.
  8.  

Port R is the lower of the two ports. As a large amount of exhaust gas enters, the engine will misfire slightly at this time.

  1. Disconnect the vacuum gauge, SST or jumper wire and reconnect the vacuum hoses to their proper locations.
  2.  
  3. Check the EGR valve by applying vacuum directly to the valve with the engine at idle. (This may be accomplished either by bridging vacuum directly from the intake manifold or by using a hand-held vacuum pump.) The engine should falter and die as the full load of recalculated gasses enters the engine.
  4.  
  5. Remove the jumper from the check connector.
  6.  
  7. If no problem is found with this inspection, the system is OK; otherwise inspect each part.
  8.  

EGR VALVE
  1. Remove the EGR valve.
  2.  
  3. Check the valve for sticking and heavy carbon deposits. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
  4.  
  5. Reinstall the EGR valve with a new gasket.
  6.  

EGR VACUUM MODULATOR

See Figures 15 and 16

  1. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from ports P , Q , and R of the EGR vacuum modulator.
  2.  
  3. Plug the P and R ports with your fingers.
  4.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 15: Blow air into port Q and check that the air passes freely through filter of the vacuum modulator

  1. Blow air into port Q . Check that the air passes freely through the sides of the air filter.
  2.  
  3. Start the engine and maintain 2500 rpm.
  4.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 16: Repeat the test with the engine running at 2500 rpm. Air should not pass through the filter

  1. Repeat the test above. Check that there is a strong resistance to air flow.
  2.  
  3. Reconnect the vacuum hoses to the proper locations.
  4.  

VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (VSV)

See Figures 17, 18, 19 and 20

  1. Check that air flows from port E to port G.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 17: Check that air flows from port E to port G of the VSV

  1. Connect the vacuum switching valve terminals to the battery.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 18: Apply battery voltage across the terminals of the VSV

  1. Check that air flows from port E to the filter.
  2.  

  1. If the VSV fails this test replace it. Any doubts perform the following test.
  2.  
  3. Remove the VSV.
  4.  
  5. Check for an open circuit. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance (ohms) between the two terminals of the valve. The resistance (cold) should be 33-39 ohms. If the resistance is not within specifications, replace the VSV.
  6.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 19: Check for an open circuit in the VSV using an ohmmeter

  1. Check for a short circuit within the valve. Using an ohmmeter, check that there is no continuity between the terminals and the VSV body. If there is continuity, replace the VSV.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 20: An ohmmeter can be used to checked for a shorted VSV also

1MZ-FE Engine
SYSTEM CHECK
  1. Check and clean the filter in the EGR vacuum modulator. Use compressed air (if possible) to blow the dirt out of the filters and check the filters for contamination or damage.
  2.  
  3. Using a tee (3-way connector), connect a vacuum gauge to the hose between the EGR valve and the vacuum modulator.
  4.  
  5. Check the seating of the EGR valve by starting the engine and seeing that it runs at a smooth idle. If the valve is not completely closed, the idle will be rough.
  6.  

The check connector is located near the air cleaner.

  1. Connect terminals TE 1 and E 1 in the check connector.
  2.  
  3. Inspect VSV and EGR vacuum modulator operation with hot engine. With the engine coolant temperature above 131°F (55°C), check the vacuum gauge and confirm 0 vacuum at 2800 rpm. Check that the EGR pipe is hot.
  4.  
  5. Warm the engine up and check that the vacuum gauge indicates low vacuum at 2800 rpm.
  6.  
  7. Disconnect the hose from port R of the EGR vacuum modulator and connect port R directly to the intake manifold with another hose. Check the vacuum and make sure the reading is high at 3500 rpm.
  8.  

Port R is the lower of the two ports. As a large amount of exhaust gas enters, the engine will misfire slightly at this time.

  1. Disconnect the vacuum gauge, SST or jumper wire and reconnect the vacuum hoses to their proper locations.
  2.  
  3. Check the EGR valve by applying vacuum directly to the valve with the engine at idle. (This may be accomplished either by bridging vacuum directly from the intake manifold or by using a hand-held vacuum pump.) The engine should falter and die as the full load of recalculated gasses enters the engine.
  4.  
  5. Remove the jumper from the check connector.
  6.  
  7. If no problem is found with this inspection, the system is OK; otherwise inspect each part.
  8.  

EGR VALVE
  1. Remove the EGR valve.
  2.  
  3. Check the valve for sticking and heavy carbon deposits. If a problem is found, replace the valve.
  4.  
  5. Reinstall the EGR valve with a new gasket.
  6.  

EGR VACUUM MODULATOR

See Figure 9

  1. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from ports P , Q , and R of the EGR vacuum modulator.
  2.  
  3. Plug the P and R ports with your fingers.
  4.  
  5. Blow air into port Q . Check that the air passes freely through the sides of the air filter.
  6.  
  7. Start the engine and maintain 3500 rpm.
  8.  
  9. Repeat the test above. Check that there is a strong resistance to air flow.
  10.  
  11. Reconnect the vacuum hoses to the proper locations.
  12.  

VACUUM SWITCHING VALVE (VSV)

See Figure 21

  1. Remove the V-bank cover and emission control valve set.
  2.  

  1. Check that air flows from port E to port G.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 21: The Vacuum Switching Valves (VSV) are located on the emission control valve rail

  1. Connect the vacuum switching valve terminals to the battery.
  2.  
  3. Check that air flows from port E to the filter.
  4.  
  5. If the VSV fails this test replace it. Any doubts perform the following test.
  6.  
  7. Remove the VSV.
  8.  
  9. Check for an open circuit. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance (ohms) between the two terminals of the valve. The resistance (cold) should be 33-39 ohms. If the resistance is not within specifications, replace the VSV.
  10.  
  11. Check for a short circuit within the valve. Using an ohmmeter, check that there is no continuity between the terminals and the VSV body. If there is continuity, replace the VSV.
  12.  

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



EGR Valve

See Figures 22, 23, 24 and 25

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2.  
  3. Remove the air cleaner hose and lid. Disconnect the IAT sensor wiring.
  4.  
  5. Disconnect the accelerator cable bracket from the throttle body.
  6.  
  7. Remove the throttle body from the air intake chamber.
  8.  
  9. Unbolt and remove the engine hanger, air intake chamber stay and EGR vacuum modulator. Discard the vacuum modulator gasket.
  10.  
  11. Loosen the union nut of the EGR valve. Disconnect and label the hoses attached to the valve.
  12.  
  13. Disconnect the EGR gas temperature sensor wiring.
  14.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 22: Prior to EGR valve removal, label all hoses for the EGR valve (1) and vacuum modulator (2)

  1. Remove the nuts, EGR valve and pipe. Discard the gaskets.
  2.  



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 23: Remove these three nuts to separate the EGR and modulator from the intake manifold



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 24: Pull the unit from the engine ...



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 25: ... and discard the old gasket

To install:
  1. Place a new gasket on the cylinder head facing the protrusion downward. Install another gasket on the EGR valve and pipe and secure with the mounting nuts. Tighten them to 9 ft. lbs. (13 Nm).
  2.  
  3. Connect the EGR gas temperature sensor wiring.
  4.  
  5. Attach the vacuum hoses to the valve in their proper locations.
  6.  
  7. Tighten the union nut on the EGR valve to 43 ft. lbs. (59 Nm).
  8.  
  9. Install the air intake chamber stay, vacuum modulator and engine hanger. Place a new gasket into position facing the protrusion downward. Tighten the assembly down with the bolt and attach the hoses.
  10.  
  11. Install the throttle body with a new gasket. Attach all wiring and hoses removed.
  12.  
  13. Connect the accelerator cable bracket to the throttle body.
  14.  
  15. Install the air cleaner and hose. Attach the IAT sensor connection.
  16.  
  17. Attach the negative battery cable.
  18.  

 
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