Toyota Celica, Corolla, ECHO & MR2 1999-05

Engine Oil & Filter

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Oil & Filter Change



Toyota recommends changing the oil filter with every other oil change; we suggest that the filter be changed with EVERY oil change. There can be up to one quart of dirty oil left remaining in an old oil filter if it is not changed.

The oil drain plug is located on the bottom of the oil pan (the belly-like reservoir held on by many bolts). The oil filter is located on the front side of the engine.



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Fig. The drain plug is located in the oil pan and the filter is close by

The mileage figures given are the Toyota recommended intervals assuming normal driving and conditions. If your car is being used under dusty, polluted or off-road conditions, change the oil and filter more frequently than specified. The same goes for cars driven in stop-and-go traffic or only for short distances. Always drain the oil after the engine has been running long enough to bring it to normal operating temperature. Hot oil will flow easier and more contaminants will be removed along with the oil than if it were drained cold. To change the oil and filter:

  1. Warm the oil by running the engine for a short period of time or at least until the needle on the temperature gauge rises above the C mark. This will make the oil flow more freely from the oil pan.
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  3. Park on a level surface, apply the parking brake and block the wheels. Stop the engine. Raise the hood and remove the oil filler cap from the top of the valve cover. This allows the air to enter the engine as the oil drains. Remove the dipstick, wipe it off and set it aside.
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Fig. Remove the oil cap, some are labeled with the type of oil to fill your crankcase with

  1. Position a suitable oil drain pan under the drain plug.
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The engine holds approximately four quarts of oil, so choose a drain pan that exceeds this amount to allow for movement of the oil when the pan is pulled from under the vehicle. This will prevent time lost to the cleaning up of messy oil spills.



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Fig. The engine oil drain plug is located on the bottom of the pan

  1. With the proper size metric socket or closed end wrench (Do NOT use pliers or vise grips), loosen the drain plug. Back out the 12mm drain plug while maintaining a slight upward force on it to keep the oil from running out around it (and your hand). Allow the oil to drain into the drain pan.
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Fig. Use inward pressure when removing the oil drain plug



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Fig. Always wipe the area clean before replacing the gasket and drain plug


CAUTION
To avoid personal injury, remember that the engine oil will be hot. Keep your arms, face and hands away from the oil as it is draining

  1. Remove the drain pan and wipe any excess oil from the area around the hole using a clean rag. Clean the threads of the drain plug and the drain plug gasket to remove any sludge deposits that may have accumulated.
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  3. With a filter wrench, loosen the oil filter counterclockwise and back the filter off the filter post the rest of the way by hand. Keep the filter end up so that the oil does not spill out. Tilt the filter into the drain pan to drain the oil.
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Fig. Place a strap wrench over the filter to loosen it ...



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Fig. ... then remove the filter with your hands

  1. Remove the drain pan from under the vehicle and place it aside.
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  3. With a clean rag, wipe off the filter seating surface to ensure a proper seal. Make sure that the old gasket is not stuck to the seating surface. If it is, remove it and thoroughly clean the seating surface of the old gasket material.
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Fig. Next wipe the filter mating area with a clean rag

  1. Open a container of new oil and smear some of this oil onto the rubber gasket of the new oil filter. Get a feel for where the filter post is and start the filter by hand until the gasket contacts the seat. Using the filter wrench, turn the filter the additional amount indicated on the filter box. This is usually 3/4 turn.
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Fig. Before installing a new oil filter, lightly coat the rubber gasket with clean oil



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Fig. Tighten the oil filter by hand until the gasket contacts the seat of the mounting

  1. Install the drain plug and gasket. Be sure that the plug is tight enough that the oil does not leak out, but not tight enough to strip the threads. Over time you will develop a sense of what the proper tightness of the drain plug is. If a torque wrench is available, tighten the plug to 29 ft. lbs. (39 Nm).
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Replace the drain plug gasket at every third or fourth oil change, or when the gasket does not create a drip-free seal.

  1. Through a suitable plastic or metal funnel, add clean new oil of the proper grade and viscosity through the oil filler on the top of the valve cover. Be sure that the oil level registers near the F (full) mark on the dipstick.
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Fig. Refill the crankcase with oil



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Fig. Once the crankcase is full of oil, double check the level on the dipstick


WARNING
Operating the engine without the proper amount and type of engine oil will result in severe engine damage.

  1. Install and tighten the oil filler cap.
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  3. Start the engine and allow it to run for several minutes.
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Do NOT rev up the engine, since damage can occur, especially to a turbocharger, if equipped.

  1. Check for leaks at the filter and drain plug. Sometimes leaks will not be revealed until the engine reaches normal operating temperature.
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  3. Stop the engine and recheck the oil level. Add oil as necessary.
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Oil Level Check



Every time you stop for fuel, check the engine oil as follows:

  1. Park the car on level ground.
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  3. When checking the oil level it is best for the engine to be at operating temperature, although checking the oil immediately after a stopping will lead to a false reading. Wait a few minutes after turning off the engine to allow the oil to drain back into the crankcase.
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  5. Open the hood and locate the dipstick.
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  7. Pull the dipstick from its tube, wipe it clean and reinsert it.
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  9. Reinsert the dipstick, push it in as far as it will go or the reading will not be accurate.
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  11. Pull the dipstick out again and, holding it horizontally, read the oil level on the end of the stick. The oil should be between the F and L marks on the dipstick. If the oil is below the L mark, add oil of the proper viscosity through the capped opening on the top of the cylinder head cover.
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Fig. The engine oil dipstick has two markings for LOW and FULL



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Fig. Only read the engine oil dipstick level when the vehicle is at operating temperature

  1. Replace the dipstick and check the oil level again after adding any oil. Be careful NOT to overfill the crankcase. Approximately one quart of oil will raise the level from the L to the F . Excess oil will generally be consumed at an accelerated rate.
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Oil Recommendations




CAUTION
The EPA warns that prolonged contact with used engine oil may cause a number of skin disorders, including cancer! You should make every effort to minimize your exposure to used engine oil. Protective gloves should be worn when changing the oil. Wash your hands and any other exposed skin areas as soon as possible after exposure to used engine oil. Soap and water, or waterless hand cleaner should be used.



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Fig. Look for the API oil identification label when choosing your engine oil



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Fig. Engine oil viscosity chart



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Fig. The International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee label

The SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) grade number indicates the viscosity of the engine oil; its resistance to flow at a given temperature. The lower the SAE grade number, the lighter the oil. For example, the mono-grade oils begin with SAE 5 weight, which is a thin light oil, and continue in viscosity up to SAE 80 or 90 weight, which are heavy gear lubricants. These oils are also known as "straight weight", meaning they are of a single viscosity, and do not vary with engine temperature.

Multi-viscosity oils offer the important advantage of being adaptable to temperature extremes. These oils have designations such as 10W-40, 20W-50, etc. The "10W-40" means that in winter (the "W" in the designation) the oil acts like a thin 10 weight oil, allowing the engine to spin easily when cold and offering rapid lubrication. Once the engine has warmed up, however, the oil acts like a straight 40 weight, maintaining good lubrication and protection for the engine's internal components. A 20W-50 oil would therefore be slightly heavier than and not as ideal in cold weather as the 10W-40, but would offer better protection at higher rpm and temperatures because when warm it acts like a 50 weight oil. Whichever oil viscosity you choose when changing the oil, make sure you are anticipating the temperatures your engine will be operating in until the oil is changed again. Refer to the oil viscosity chart for oil recommendations according to temperature.

The API (American Petroleum Institute) designation indicates the classification of engine oil used under certain given operating conditions. Only oils designated for use "Service SH" should be used. Oils of the SH type perform a variety of functions inside the engine in addition to the basic function as a lubricant. Through a balanced system of metallic detergents and polymeric dispersants, the oil prevents the formation of high and low temperature deposits and also keeps sludge and particles of dirt in suspension. Acids, particularly sulfuric acid, as well as other by-products of combustion, are neutralized. Both the SAE grade number and the APE designation can be found on top of the oil can.

Synthetic Oil

WARNING
Operating the engine without the proper amount and type of engine oil will result in severe engine damage.

There are many excellent synthetic and fuel-efficient oils currently available that can provide better gas mileage, longer service life, and in some cases better engine protection. These benefits do not come without a few hitches, however. The main one is the price of synthetic oils, which is three or four times the price per quart of conventional oil.

Synthetic oil is not for every car and every type of driving, so you should consider your engine's condition and your type of driving. Also, check your car's warranty conditions regarding the use of synthetic oils.

Both brand new engines and older, high mileage engines are the wrong candidates for synthetic oil. The synthetic oils are so slippery that they can prevent the proper break-in of new engines; most manufacturers recommend that you wait until the engine is properly broken in (3000 miles) before using synthetic oil. Older engines with wear have a different problem with synthetics: they "use" (consume during operation) more oil as they age. Slippery synthetic oils get past these worn parts easily. If your engine is "using" conventional oil, it will use synthetics much faster. Also, if your car is leaking oil past old seals you'll have a much greater leak problem with synthetics.

Consider your type of driving. If most of your accumulated mileage is high speed, highway type driving, the more expensive synthetic oils may be a benefit. Extended highway driving gives the engine a chance to warm up, accumulating less acids in the oil and putting less stress on the engine over the long run. Under these conditions, the oil change interval can be extended (as long as your oil filter can last the extended life of the oil) up to the advertised mileage claims of the synthetics. Cars with synthetic oils may show increased fuel economy in highway driving, due to less internal friction. However, many automotive experts agree that 50,000 miles (80,000 km) is too long to keep any oil in your engine.

 
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