Toyota Pick-ups, Land Cruiser, and 4 Runner 1997-00

Brake Pads

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WEAR INDICATORS



The front disc brake pads may be equipped with a metal tab, which will come into contact with the rotor after the friction surface material, has worn near its usable minimum. The wear indicators make a constant, distinct metallic sound that should be easily heard. The sound has been described as similar to either "fingernails on a blackboard" or "a field full of crickets." The key to recognizing that it is the wear indicators and not some other brake noise is that the sound is heard when the vehicle is being driven WITHOUT the brakes applied. It may or may not be present under braking and is heard during normal driving.

It should also be noted that any disc brake system, by its design, cannot be made to work silently under all conditions. Each system includes various shims, plates, cushions and brackets to suppress brake noise, but no system can completely silence all noises. Some brake noise, either high or low frequency, can be controlled and perhaps lessened, but cannot be totally eliminated.

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



2WD Vehicles
PD60 AND 66 TYPE BRAKES


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Fig. Exploded view of the PD60 and 66 type brake components

  1. Remove a small amount of fluid from the reservoir, using a syringe or similar tool.
  2.  
  3. Raise the front of the truck and safely support it with jackstands.
  4.  
  5. Remove the lug nuts and the wheel.
  6.  
  7. Remove the lower installation bolt from the torque plate. The torque plate is the framework that holds the caliper.
  8.  
  9. Pivot the caliper assembly upwards and suspend it from the suspension with a wire. Do NOT disconnect the brake line, but take care not to stretch it.
  10.  
  11. Remove the two anti-squeal springs and lift out the brake pads.
  12.  
  13. Remove the two anti-squeal shims and the four pad support plates. Pull the two pad wear indicators off the pads.
  14.  
  15. Check the pad thickness and replace the pads if they are less than 0.039 in. (1mm) thick. New pads measure approximately 0.3740.472 in. (9.612.0mm) thick depending on the vehicle.
  16.  

This minimum thickness measurement may disagree with your state inspection laws.

To install:

  1. Install the four pad support plates into the torque plate.
  2.  
  3. Install a new pad wear indicator plate to each pad.
  4.  
  5. Install the large anti-squeal shim to the back of the outer pad (PD 60) or to the back of each pad (PD 66) and then position both pads into the torque plate. Install the anti-squeal springs in place.
  6.  

When installing new brake pads, make sure your hands are clean. Do NOT allow any grease or oil to touch the contact face of the pads or the brakes may not stop the truck properly.

  1. Use a C-clamp or hammer handle and press the caliper piston back into the housing.
  2.  


WARNING
NEVER press the piston into the caliper when the pads are out on both sides of the truck. The opposite piston may pop completely out of the caliper. This may spoil your afternoon.

  1. For PD 60 type pads, press the round anti-squeal shim over the caliper piston; position the caliper over the torque plate so the dust boot is not pinched.
  2.  
  3. Swing the caliper down and fit the lower bolt. Tighten it to 29 ft. lbs. (39 Nm).
  4.  
  5. Install the wheel and lower the truck. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir and fill to the max line if necessary. (The level should have risen when the piston was pushed back.)
  6.  
  7. Apply the parking brake and put the vehicle in Park or Neutral. Step on the brake pedal two or three times. The first pedal application will be due to the pistons being pushed back. The pedal travel should be normal after two or three pumps. Do NOT drive the vehicle until the pedal has a normal feel. If necessary, bleed the brakes to remove pedal sponginess.
  8.  

Braking should be moderate for the first 5 miles (8 km) or so until the new pads seat correctly. The new pads will bed best if put through several moderate heating and cooling cycles. Avoid hard braking until the brakes have experienced several long, slow stops with time to cool in between. Taking the time to properly bed the brakes will yield quieter operation, more efficient stopping and contribute to extended brake life.

FS17 AND 18 TYPE BRAKES


Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Exploded view of the FS17 and FS18 type brake components

  1. Remove the hub cap and loosen the lug nuts.
  2.  
  3. Raise the front of the truck and safely support it with jackstands.
  4.  
  5. Remove the lug nuts and the wheel.
  6.  
  7. Remove the caliper slide pin on the sub-pin (lower) side.
  8.  
  9. Swivel the caliper up and away from the torque plate. Tie the caliper to a suspension member so it is out of the way. Do NOT disconnect the brake line.
  10.  
  11. Lift the two brake pads out of the torque plate. Remove the anti-squeal shim.
  12.  
  13. Remove the four pad support plates. Pull the two pad wear indicator plates off the pads.
  14.  
  15. Check the pad thickness and replace the pads if they are less than 0.03 in. (1mm) thick. New pads measure approximately 0.374 in. (9.6mm) thick.
  16.  

This minimum thickness measurement may disagree with your state inspection laws.

To install:

  1. Install the four pad support plates into the torque plate.
  2.  
  3. Install a new pad wear indicator plate to the bottom of each pad.
  4.  
  5. Install the anti-squeal shim to the back of the outer pad and then position both pads into the torque plate.
  6.  


WARNING
When installing new brake pads, make sure your hands are clean. Do NOT allow any grease or oil to touch the contact face of the pads or the brakes will not stop the truck properly.

  1. Use a syringe or similar tool to remove some fluid from the reservoir. Use a C-clamp or hammer handle and press the caliper piston back into the housing.
  2.  
  3. Untie the caliper and swivel it back into position over the torque plate so that the dust boot is not pinched. Install the slide pin and tighten it to 65 ft. lbs. (88 Nm).
  4.  
  5. Check the condition of the cylinder side bushing boot.
  6.  
  7. Install the wheel and lower the truck.
  8.  
  9. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir and fill to the max line if necessary. (The level should have risen when the piston was pushed back.)
  10.  
  11. Apply the parking brake and put the vehicle in Park or Neutral . Step on the brake pedal two or three times. The first pedal application will be due to the pistons being pushed back. The pedal travel should be normal after two or three pumps. Do NOT drive the vehicle until the pedal has a normal feel. If necessary, bleed the brakes to remove pedal sponginess.
  12.  

Braking should be moderate for the first 5 miles (8 km) or so until the new pads seat correctly. The new pads will bed best if put through several moderate heating and cooling cycles. Avoid hard braking until the brakes have experienced several long, slow stops with time to cool in between. Taking the time to properly bed the brakes will yield quieter operation, more efficient stopping and contribute to extended brake life.

4WD Vehicles


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Fig. View of the caliper with the brake pads installedTacoma shown



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Fig. Use a small prytool to lift the lower part of the spring clip out of the tiny hole in the side of the caliper



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Fig. Pull the anti-rattle clip/spring retainer out



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Fig. View of the anti-rattle spring on a Tundra



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Fig. Remove the pad pinsTundra



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Fig. Pull out the upper brake pad retaining pin . . .



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Fig. . . . then remove the lower brake pad retaining pin



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Fig. Pull out the right pad



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Fig. Remove the brake pad by pulling it straight up



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Fig. Remove the pad shims



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Fig. Apply a suitable anti-seize lubricant to the pad's metal backing plate



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Fig. Install a pad shim on to the back of the brake pad and then coat it with a thin layer of anti-seize



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Fig. Do NOT apply anti-seize to the rear of the final brake pad shim to be installed

  1. Raise the front of the truck, support it on jackstands, and remove the front wheel.
  2.  
  3. Pull out the wire clip at the ends of the pad pins.
  4.  
  5. Remove the pins. Remove the anti-rattle spring (W-shaped on older trucks), the brake pads and the four anti-squeal shims.
  6.  
  7. Check the pad thickness and replace the pads if they are less than 0.03 in. (1mm) thick. New pads measure approximately 0.374 in. (9.6mm) thick.
  8.  

This minimum thickness measurement may disagree with your state inspection laws.

  1. Check the pins for straightness and wear, and replace if necessary.
  2.  

To install:

  1. Use a syringe or similar tool to remove a small amount of fluid from the master cylinder reservoir.
  2.  
  3. Use a C-clamp and press the caliper pistons back into the housing.
  4.  

NEVER press the pistons into the caliper when the pads are out on both sides of the truck.

  1. Install the four anti-squeal shims so that the black shims are between the silver shims and the brake pad.
  2.  
  3. Install the brake pads. Be very careful NOT to get grease or oil on the inner surfaces of the pads.
  4.  
  5. Install the anti-rattle spring.
  6.  
  7. Slide the two pad retaining pins through the caliper and pads and install the retaining clip.
  8.  
  9. Install the wheel and lower the truck. Bleed the brakes and road test the vehicle.
  10.  
  11. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir and fill to the max line if necessary. (The level should have risen when the piston was pushed back.)
  12.  
  13. Apply the parking brake and put the vehicle in Park or Neutral . Step on the brake pedal two or three times. The first pedal application will be due to the pistons being pushed back. The pedal travel should be normal after two or three pumps. Do NOT drive the vehicle until the pedal has a normal feel. If necessary, bleed the brakes to remove pedal sponginess.
  14.  

Braking should be moderate for the first 5 miles (8 km) or so until the new pads seat correctly. The new pads will bed best if put through several moderate heating and cooling cycles. Avoid hard braking until the brakes have experienced several long, slow stops with time to cool in between. Taking the time to properly bed the brakes will yield quieter operation, more efficient stopping and contribute to extended brake life.

INSPECTION





Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Measuring brake pad thickness

The front brake pads may be inspected without removal. With the front end elevated and supported, remove the wheel(s). Unlock the steering column lock and turn the wheel so that the brake caliper is out from under the fender.

View the pads, inner and outer, through the cut-out in the center of the caliper. Remember to look at the thickness of the pad friction material (the part that actually presses on the disc) rather than the thickness of the backing plate that does not change with wear.

Keep in mind that you are looking at the profile of the pad, not the whole thing. Brake pads can wear on a taper, which may not be visible through the window. It is also not possible to check the contact surface for cracking or scoring from this position. This quick check can be helpful only as a reference; detailed inspection requires pad removal.

 
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