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    Toyota Tercel 1984-1994 Repair Guide

    WIRING DIAGRAMS

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    The average automobile contains about 1 / 2 mile of wiring, with hundreds of individual connections. To protect the many wires from damage and to keep them from becoming a confusing tangle, they are organized into bundles, enclosed in plastic or taped together and called wiring harnesses. Different harnesses serve different parts of the vehicle. Individual wires are color coded to help trace them through a harness where sections are hidden from view.

    Automotive wiring or circuit conductors can be in any one of three forms:

    1. Single strand wire
    2.  
    3. Multi-strand wire
    4.  
    5. Printed circuitry
    6.  

    Single strand wire has a solid metal core and is usually used inside such components as alternators, motors, relays and other devices. Multi-strand wire has a core made of many small strands of wire twisted together into a single conductor. Most of the wiring in an automotive electrical system is made up of multi-strand wire, either as a single conductor or grouped together in a harness. All wiring is color coded on the insulator, either as a solid color or as a colored wire with an identification stripe. A printed circuit is a thin film of copper or other conductor that is printed on an insulator backing. Occasionally, a printed circuit is sandwiched between two sheets of plastic for more protection and flexibility. A complete printed circuit, consisting of conductors, insulating material and connectors for lamps or other components is called a printed circuit board. Printed circuitry is used in place of individual wires or harnesses in places where space is limited, such as behind instrument panels.

    Since automotive electrical systems are very sensitive to changes in resistance, the selection of properly sized wires is critical when systems are repaired. A loose or corroded connection or a replacement wire that is too small for the circuit will add extra resistance and an additional voltage drop to the circuit. A ten percent voltage drop can result in slow or erratic motor operation, for example, even though the circuit is complete. The wire gauge number is an expression of the cross section area of the conductor. The most common system for expressing wire size is the American Wire Gauge (AWG) system.

    Gauge numbers are assigned to conductors of various cross section areas. As gauge number increases, area decreases and the conductor becomes smaller. A 5 gauge conductor is smaller than a 1 gauge conductor and a 10 gauge is smaller than a 5 gauge. As the cross section area of a conductor decreases, resistance increases and so does the gauge number. A conductor with a higher gauge number will carry less current than a conductor with a lower gauge number.

    Gauge wire size refers to the size of the conductor, not the size of the complete wire. It is possible to have two wires of the same gauge with different diameters because one may have thicker insulation than the other.

    12 volt automotive electrical systems generally use 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 gauge wire. Main power distribution circuits and larger accessories usually use 10 and 12 gauge wire. Battery cables are usually 4 or 6 gauge, although 1 and 2 gauge wires are occasionally used. Wire length must also be considered when making repairs to a circuit. As conductor length increases, so does resistance. An 18 gauge wire, for example, can carry a 10 amp load for 10 feet without excessive voltage drop; however if a 15 foot wire is required for the same 10 amp load, it must be a 16 gauge wire.

    An electrical schematic shows the electrical current paths when a circuit is operating properly. It is essential to understand how a circuit works before trying to figure out why it doesn't. Schematics break the entire electrical system down into individual circuits and show only one particular circuit. In a schematic, no attempt is made to represent wiring and components as they physically appear on the vehicle; switches and other components are shown as simply as possible. Face views of harness connectors show the cavity or terminal locations in all multi-pin connectors to help locate test points.

    See Figures 1 thru 30





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    Fig. Fig. 1: 1984 engine wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 2: 1984 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 3: 1985 engine wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 4: 1985 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 5: 1986 engine wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 6: 1986 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 7: 1987 engine wiring diagram; sedan

     


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    Fig. Fig. 8: 1987 body wiring diagram; sedan

     


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    Fig. Fig. 9: 1987 engine wiring diagram; wagon

     


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    Fig. Fig. 10: 1987 body wiring diagram; wagon

     


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    Fig. Fig. 11: 1988 engine wiring diagram; sedan

     


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    Fig. Fig. 12: 1988 body wiring diagram; sedan

     


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    Fig. Fig. 13: 1988 engine wiring diagram; wagon

     


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    Fig. Fig. 14: 1988 body wiring diagram; wagon

     


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    Fig. Fig. 15: 1989 engine wiring diagram; Federal

     


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    Fig. Fig. 16: 1989 engine wiring diagram; California

     


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    Fig. Fig. 17: 1989 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 18: 1989 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 19: 1990 engine wiring diagram; fuel injected

     


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    Fig. Fig. 20: 1990 engine wiring diagram; Federal carbureted

     


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    Fig. Fig. 21: 1990 engine wiring diagram; California carbureted

     


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    Fig. Fig. 22: 1990 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 23: 1991 engine wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 24: 1991 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 25: 1992 engine wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 26: 1992 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 27: 1993 engine wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 28: 1993 body wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 29: 1994 engine wiring diagram

     


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    Fig. Fig. 30: 1994 body wiring diagram

     

     
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