Vibe 2006-2007

1.8L L4 VIN 8 Std 2

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Trouble Code: P0123



Throttle Position (TP) Sensor 1 Circuit High Voltage

Possible Causes:



On the scan tool, a good TP sensor 1 will typically display a TP angle of 8-10 percent at idle, and 76-77 percent at wide open throttle (WOT).
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the TAC module electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 
The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0125



Excessive Time To Closed Loop Fuel Control

Possible Causes:

Check for any of the following conditions:



Check for the proper operation of the engines cooling system, including the correct coolant level. Refer to Engine Fails To Reach Normal Operating Temperature .
 
A faulty thermostat that stays open slightly can cause DTC P0125 to set in cold weather when the vehicle is started and let sit while warming up. Replace any suspect thermostat.
 
Use the Temperature vs Resistance table in order to evaluate the possibility of a shifted ECT sensor. A shifted sensor could result in DTC P0125. Refer to Temperature Versus Resistance .
 
Check for a faulty electrical connection to the PCM.
 

Trouble Code: P0128



Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Below Thermostat Regulating Temperature

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



A faulty thermostat that stays open slightly can cause DTC P0128 to set in cold weather when the vehicle is started and allowed to sit while warming up. Replace any suspect thermostat. Refer to Thermostat Diagnosis in Engine Cooling.
 
An incorrect thermostat can cause the engine to warm up slowly. Replace any thermostat that does not meet OEM specifications. Refer to Thermostat Diagnosis in Engine Cooling.
 
Use the Temperature vs Resistance table in order to evaluate the possibility of a shifted ECT sensor. A shifted sensor could result in DTC P0128. Refer to Temperature vs Resistance .
 
Check for the proper operation of the engine cooling system, including the correct coolant level.
 
Check for a faulty electrical connection to the PCM.
 

Trouble Code: P0128



Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Below Thermostat Regulating Temperature

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



A faulty thermostat that stays open slightly can cause DTC P0128 to set in cold weather when the vehicle is started and allowed to sit while warming up. Replace any suspect thermostat. Refer to Engine Coolant Thermostat Replacement .
 
An incorrect thermostat can cause the engine to warm up slowly. Replace any thermostat that does not meet OEM specifications. Refer to Engine Coolant Thermostat Replacement .
 
Use the Temperature vs Resistance table in order to evaluate the possibility of a shifted ECT sensor. A shifted sensor could result in DTC P0128. Refer to Temperature Versus Resistance .
 
Check for the proper operation of the engine cooling system, including the correct coolant level.
 
Check for a faulty electrical connection to the PCM.
 

Trouble Code: P0130



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Circuit Sensor 1

Possible Causes:

A DTC P0130 is more likely to set during city driving. Avoid operating the vehicle on the highway when validating a DTC P0130. The scan tool output control feature, Fuel Injector Modification, can be used at idle to check the oxygen sensor performance. Increasing the Fuel Injector Modification Commanded State to 25 percent should cause the HO2S 1 voltage to exceed 800 mV. Decreasing the Fuel Injector Modification Commanded State to -12 percent should cause the HO2S 1 voltage to drop to less than 100 mV. An oxygen sensor that fails to respond accordingly may be faulty or contaminated. When performing a Fuel Injector Modification with the scan tool, the Loop Status will remain Open Loop and the Short Term FT will be fixed at 0 percent. If a DTC P0130 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section can verify whether the fault is present. Refer to Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) Heated Oxygen Sensor/Oxygen Sensor (HO2S/O2S) System Set Procedure . Check for any of the following conditions:



A mis-routed heated oxygen sensor wiring--The sensor pigtail may be mis-routed and contacting the exhaust system causing a short to ground.
 
Verify the PCM to engine electrical grounds are OK.
 
An incorrect fuel pressure--The fuel system can go lean if the fuel pressure is too low and DTC P0130 may be set. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .
 
An incorrectly calibrated fuel injector
 
Any vacuum leaks--inspect for disconnected or damaged vacuum hoses and for vacuum leaks at the intake manifold, the throttle body, and the crankcase ventilation system.
 
Any exhaust leaks near the HO2S--An exhaust leak may cause outside air to be pulled into the exhaust gas stream and past the HO2S. The outside air may cause DTC P0130 to set.
 
A shorted HO2S--An HO2S that is shorted to ground will display less than 0.1 volt on the scan tool. An HO2S that is shorted to voltage will display a reading of more than 1 volt on the scan tool. Water contamination of the HO2S can cause a low or high HO2S voltage to be indicated. A DTC P0130 that occurs more frequently when driving through standing water or when operating the vehicle in wet driving conditions can indicate water intrusion. Replace the HO2S if the sensor is adversely affected by moisture.
 
A contaminated HO2S--Silicon contamination of the HO2S can cause a low signal voltage to be indicated. Silicon contamination is indicated by a powdery white deposit on the portion of the HO2S exposed to the exhaust stream. Before replacing the HO2S, determine the cause of the contamination and correct the condition.
 
Fuel contamination--Small amounts of water can be delivered to the fuel injectors and cause a lean exhaust indication. A lean exhaust indication can also be caused by too much alcohol in the fuel. Refer to Alcohol/Contaminants-in-Fuel Diagnosis .
 
A faulty electrical connection to the PCM
 
A saturated evaporative emission (EVAP) canister or a faulty EVAP purge control--Refer to Evaporative Emission (EVAP) Control System Diagnosis .
 

Trouble Code: P0133



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Slow Response Sensor 1

Possible Causes:



Check for a contaminated HO2S. Silicon contamination of the HO2S can cause a low signal voltage to be indicated. Silicon contamination is indicated by a powdery white deposit on the portion of the HO2S exposed to the exhaust stream. Before replacing the HO2S determine the cause of the contamination and correct the condition. If a DTC P0133 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section can verify whether the fault is present. Refer to Inspection/Maintenance Heated Oxygen Sensor/Oxygen Sensor System Set . An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the HO2S 1 electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for any intermittent conditions. Refer to Intermittent Conditions . The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0134



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Circuit Sensor 1

Possible Causes:

A DTC P0134 can set when the vehicle runs out of fuel. Ask the vehicle operator if the vehicle has recently been run out of fuel. The scan tool output control feature, Fuel Injector Modification, can be used at idle to check the oxygen sensor performance. Increasing the Fuel Injector Modification Commanded State to 25 percent should cause the HO2S 1 voltage to exceed 800 mV. Decreasing the Fuel Injector Modification Commanded State to -12 percent should cause the HO2S 1 voltage to drop to less than 100 mV. An oxygen sensor that fails to respond accordingly may be faulty or contaminated. When performing a Fuel Injector Modification with the scan tool, the Loop Status will remain Open Loop and the Short Term FT will be fixed at 0 percent. If a DTC P0134 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section can verify whether the fault is present. Refer to Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) Heated Oxygen Sensor/Oxygen Sensor (HO2S/O2S) System Set Procedure . Check for any of the following conditions:



A mis-routed heated oxygen sensor wiring--The sensor pigtail may be mis-routed and contacting the exhaust system causing a short to ground.
 
Verify the PCM to engine electrical grounds are OK.
 
An incorrect fuel pressure--The fuel system can go lean if the fuel pressure is too low and DTC P0134 may be set. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .
 
An incorrectly calibrated fuel injector
 
Any vacuum leaks--inspect for disconnected or damaged vacuum hoses and for vacuum leaks at the intake manifold, the throttle body, and the crankcase ventilation system.
 
Any exhaust leaks near the HO2S--An exhaust leak may cause outside air to be pulled into the exhaust gas stream and past the HO2S. The outside air may cause DTC P0134 to set.
 
A shorted HO2S--An HO2S that is shorted to ground will display less than 0.1 volt on the scan tool. An HO2S that is shorted to voltage will display a reading of more than 1.0 volt on the scan tool. Water contamination of the HO2S can cause a low or high HO2S voltage to be indicated. A DTC P0134 that occurs more frequently when driving through standing water or when operating the vehicle in wet driving conditions can indicate water intrusion. Replace the HO2S if the sensor is adversely affected by moisture.
 
A contaminated HO2S--Silicon contamination of the HO2S can cause a low signal voltage to be indicated. Silicon contamination is indicated by a powdery white deposit on the portion of the HO2S exposed to the exhaust stream. Before replacing the HO2S, determine the cause of the contamination and correct the condition.
 
Fuel contamination--Small amounts of water can be delivered to the fuel injectors and cause a lean exhaust indication. A lean exhaust indication can also be caused by too much alcohol in the fuel. Refer to Alcohol/Contaminants-in-Fuel Diagnosis .
 
A faulty electrical connection to the PCM
 

Trouble Code: P0136



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Circuit Sensor 2

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



Inspect the wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 2 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and the wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the HO2S 2 display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
If a DTC P0136 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section can verify whether the fault is present. Refer to Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) Heated Oxygen Sensor/Oxygen Sensor (HO2S/O2S) System Set Procedure .
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the HO2S circuit sensor electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs in Wiring Systems.
 

Trouble Code: P0136



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Circuit Sensor 2

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



The HO2S 2 input voltage on a cold sensor, ignition ON with the engine OFF, is approximately 55 mV.
 
Inspect for an exhaust system leak near the HO2S 2 . Fresh air entering the exhaust flow near the sensor can cause a false low voltage input.
 
Inspect the wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 2 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and the wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the HO2S 2 display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
If a DTC P0136 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section can verify whether the fault is present. Refer to Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) Heated Oxygen Sensor/Oxygen Sensor (HO2S/O2S) System Set Procedure .
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the HO2S circuit sensor electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 

Trouble Code: P0137



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Circuit Low Voltage Sensor 2

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



The HO2S 2 input voltage on a cold sensor, ignition ON with the engine OFF, is approximately 55 mV.
 
Inspect for an exhaust system leak near the HO2S 2 . Fresh air entering the exhaust flow near the sensor can cause a false low voltage input.
 
Inspect the wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 2 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and the wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the HO2S 2 display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
If a DTC P0137 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section for HO2S tests can verify whether the fault is present.
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the HO2S circuit sensor electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 

Trouble Code: P0137



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Circuit Low Voltage Sensor 2

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



The HO2S 2 input voltage on a cold sensor, ignition ON with the engine OFF, is approximately 55 mV.
 
Inspect for an exhaust system leak near the HO2S 2 . Fresh air entering the exhaust flow near the sensor can cause a false low voltage input.
 
Inspect the wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 2 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and the wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the HO2S 2 display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
If a DTC P0137 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section can verify whether the fault is present. Refer to Inspection/Maintenance Heated Oxygen Sensor/Oxygen Sensor System Set .
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the HO2S circuit sensor electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 

Trouble Code: P0138



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Circuit High Voltage Sensor 2

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



The HO2S 2 input voltage on a cold sensor, ignition ON with the engine OFF, is approximately 55 mV.
 
Inspect the wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 2 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and the wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the HO2S 2 display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
If a DTC P0138 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section can verify whether the fault is present. Refer to Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) Heated Oxygen Sensor/Oxygen Sensor (HO2S/O2S) System Set Procedure .
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the HO2S circuit sensor electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 

Trouble Code: P0138



Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Circuit High Voltage Sensor 2

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



The HO2S 2 input voltage on a cold sensor, ignition ON with the engine OFF, is approximately 55 mV.
 
Inspect the wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 2 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and the wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the HO2S 2 display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
If a DTC P0138 is intermittent, driving the vehicle under the conditions outlined in the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) section can verify whether the fault is present. Refer to Inspection/Maintenance Heated Oxygen Sensor/Oxygen Sensor System Set .
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the HO2S circuit sensor electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 

Trouble Code: P0171



Fuel Trim System Lean

Possible Causes:

Check for any of the following conditions:



Check for vacuum leaks.
 
Check for exhaust leaks.
 
Check for the correct fuel pressure. The fuel system will be lean if fuel pressure is too low. In order to determine the cause of DTC P0171 monitoring the fuel pressure while driving the vehicle at various road speeds may be necessary. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .
 
Inspect the wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 1 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
Check for a contaminated oxygen sensor. Silicone and other contaminants can cause the oxygen sensor to provide false lean exhaust readings. If contamination is found, determine the cause of the contamination and correct the condition before replacing the HO2S.
 
Inspect the HO2S 1 for water intrusion into the wiring harness and the sensor housing. Water can create a short to ground in the HO2S signal circuit, causing a false lean indication.
 
Check the HO2S 1 and the MAF sensor for faulty electrical connections to the PCM.
 

Trouble Code: P0171



Fuel Trim System Lean

Possible Causes:

Check for any of the following conditions:



Check for vacuum leaks.
 
Check for exhaust leaks.
 
Check for the correct fuel pressure. The fuel system will be lean if fuel pressure is too low. In order to determine the cause of DTC P0171 monitoring the fuel pressure while driving the vehicle at various road speeds may be necessary. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .
 
Inspect the wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 1 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
Check for a contaminated oxygen sensor. Silicone and other contaminants can cause the oxygen sensor to provide false lean exhaust readings. If contamination is found, determine the cause of the contamination and correct the condition before replacing the HO2S.
 
Inspect the HO2S 1 for water intrusion into the wiring harness and the sensor housing. Water can create a short to ground in the HO2S signal circuit, causing a false lean indication.
 
Check the HO2S 1 and the mass air flow (MAF) sensor for faulty electrical connections to the PCM.
 

Trouble Code: P0172



Fuel Trim System Rich

Possible Causes:

Check for any of the following conditions:



Check for a restriction in the inlet air passage. A duct or inlet hose that collapses when hot or that is blocked by debris can cause a DTC P0172 to set.
 
Check for the correct fuel pressure. The fuel system will be rich if the fuel pressure is too high. In order to determine the cause of a DTC P0172 monitoring the fuel pressure while driving the vehicle at various road speeds may be necessary. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .
 
Check for fuel contamination of the crankcase. Fuel that has entered the crankcase can release vapors that enter the engine through the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system, thereby causing a rich running condition.
 
Check for a damaged wiring harness. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the HO2S 1 display on the scan tool while moving the connectors and the wiring harnesses related to the sensor. A change in the display will indicate the location of the fault.
 
Check for a contaminated oxygen sensor. Silicone and other contaminants can cause the oxygen sensor to provide false exhaust oxygen content readings. If contamination is found, determine the cause and correct the condition before replacing the HO2S.
 
Inspect the HO2S 1 for water intrusion into the wiring harness and the sensor housing. Water can create a short to voltage in the HO2S signal circuit causing a false rich indication.
 
Check the HO2S 1 and the mass air flow (MAF) sensor for a faulty electrical connection to the PCM.
 

Trouble Code: P0172



Fuel Trim System Rich

Possible Causes:

Check for any of the following conditions:



Check for a restriction in the inlet air passage. A duct or inlet hose that collapses when hot or that is blocked by debris can cause a DTC P0172 to set.
 
Check for the correct fuel pressure. The fuel system will be rich if the fuel pressure is too high. In order to determine the cause of a DTC P0172 monitoring the fuel pressure while driving the vehicle at various road speeds may be necessary. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .
 
Check for fuel contamination of the crankcase. Fuel that has entered the crankcase can release vapors that enter the engine through the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system, thereby causing a rich running condition.
 
Check for a contaminated oxygen sensor. Silicone and other contaminants can cause the oxygen sensor to provide false exhaust oxygen content readings. If contamination is found, determine the cause and correct the condition before replacing the HO2S.
 
Inspect the HO2S 1 for water intrusion into the wiring harness and the sensor housing. Water can create a short to voltage in the HO2S signal circuit causing a false rich indication.
 
Check the HO2S 1 and the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor for a faulty electrical connection to the PCM.
 

Trouble Code: P0220



Throttle Position (TP) Sensor 2 Circuit

Possible Causes:



On the scan tool a good TP sensor 2 will typically display a voltage of 2.3-2.4 volts at idle, and 4.5 volts at wide open throttle (WOT).
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the TAC module electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 
The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0222



Throttle Position (TP) Sensor 2 Circuit Low Voltage

Possible Causes:



On the scan tool a good TP sensor 2 will typically display a voltage of 2.3-2.4 volts at idle, and 4.5 volts at wide open throttle (WOT).
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the TAC module electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 
The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0223



Throttle Position (TP) Sensor 2 Circuit High Voltage

Possible Causes:



On the scan tool a good TP sensor 2 will typically display a voltage of 2.3-2.4 volts at idle, and 4.5 volts at wide open throttle (WOT).
 
An intermittent malfunction may be caused by fault in the TAC module electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .
 
Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .
 
The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0300



Engine Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:

Check for the following conditions:



If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300 to P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
If DTCs P0301, P0302, P0303, or P0304 are also present with DTC P0300, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0300 to set. Check the ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Replacement .
 
A MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the HO2S voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 
Check for engine overheating.
 
Check for a positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system malfunction. Perform a functional check of the PCV valve. Refer to Crankcase Ventilation System Inspection/Diagnosis .
 

Trouble Code: P0300



Engine Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:



Check for the following conditions:

If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300 to P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
If DTCs P0301, P0302, P0303, or P0304 are also present with DTC P0300, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0300 to set. Check the ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the Misfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material.
 
A MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 
Check for engine overheating.
 
Check for a positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system malfunction. Perform a functional check of the PCV valve.
 

An intermittent malfunction may be caused by a fault in the ignition system or fuel system electrical circuits. Inspect the wiring harness and the components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0301



Cylinder 1 Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:

Inspect for any of the following conditions:



If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300-P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0301-P0304 to set. Check ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Replacement .
 
Inspect for engine overheating. Refer to Engine Overheating in Engine Cooling.
 
A MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 

Trouble Code: P0301



Cylinder 1 Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:



Inspect for any of the following conditions:

If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300 to P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0301-P0304 to set. Check ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position Sensor Replacement .
 
Inspect for engine overheating. Refer to Engine Overheating .
 
An MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 

An intermittent malfunction may be caused by a fault in the electrical circuits of the ignition system or fuel system of the misfiring cylinder. Inspect the wiring harness and the components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0302



Cylinder 2 Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:

Inspect for any of the following conditions:



If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300-P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0301-P0304 to set. Check ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Replacement .
 
Inspect for engine overheating. Refer to Engine Overheating in Engine Cooling.
 
A MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 

Trouble Code: P0302



Cylinder 2 Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:



Inspect for any of the following conditions:

If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300 to P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0301-P0304 to set. Check ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position Sensor Replacement .
 
Inspect for engine overheating. Refer to Engine Overheating .
 
An MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 

An intermittent malfunction may be caused by a fault in the electrical circuits of the ignition system or fuel system of the misfiring cylinder. Inspect the wiring harness and the components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0303



Cylinder 3 Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:

Inspect for any of the following conditions:



If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300-P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0301-P0304 to set. Check ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Replacement .
 
Inspect for engine overheating. Refer to Engine Overheating in Engine Cooling.
 
A MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 

Trouble Code: P0303



Cylinder 3 Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:



Inspect for any of the following conditions:

If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300 to P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0301-P0304 to set. Check ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position Sensor Replacement .
 
Inspect for engine overheating. Refer to Engine Overheating .
 
An MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 

An intermittent malfunction may be caused by a fault in the electrical circuits of the ignition system or fuel system of the misfiring cylinder. Inspect the wiring harness and the components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0304



Cylinder 4 Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:

Inspect for any of the following conditions:



If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300-P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0301-P0304 to set. Check ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Replacement .
 
Inspect for engine overheating. Refer to Engine Overheating in Engine Cooling.
 
A MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 

Trouble Code: P0304



Cylinder 4 Misfire Detected

Possible Causes:



Inspect for any of the following conditions:

If any DTCs other than misfire (P0300 to P0304) are present, diagnose those DTCs first.
 
An intermittent ignition system malfunction may cause DTC P0301-P0304 to set. Check ignition system performance with an engine oscilloscope.
 
The scan tool data parameters Engine Speed at Misfire and Load at Misfire are populated and frozen at the time the MIL illuminates. These scan tool displays can be used like additional lines of Freeze Frame data. Review the information located in the Engine Speed at Misfire and the Load at Misfire scan tool parameters. The information can help determine engine operation when the misfire occurred.
 
Review the misfire counters located in the MIsfire Data list of the scan tool while the engine is running. If any of the Misfire Current Cylinder data parameters is increasing, the misfire condition is present. Misfire activity can be monitored with the scan tool in the Misfire Current Cyl # data list parameter of the appropriate cylinder. Use this information in order to determine if the fault is present or an intermittent malfunction.
 
An intermittent can also be the result of a defective CKP sensor signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and inspect the signal rotor through the sensor hole. Check the condition of the signal rotor for nicks, dents, missing teeth, and foreign material. Refer to Crankshaft Position Sensor Replacement .
 
Inspect for engine overheating. Refer to Engine Overheating .
 
An MAF sensor output that is incorrect may cause the PCM to command the fuel system to go lean. Check the performance of the MAF sensor. If the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) voltage is fixed low, while the fuel trim is constantly high, check the MAF sensor signal circuit for resistance. High circuit resistance can cause the sensor to read a lower volume of air than actual, resulting in a lean fueling condition that can cause engine misfire.
 

An intermittent malfunction may be caused by a fault in the electrical circuits of the ignition system or fuel system of the misfiring cylinder. Inspect the wiring harness and the components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0325



Knock Sensor (KS) Circuit

Possible Causes:

Inspect for the following conditions:



A loose KS can cause a loss of the KS signal. Check the KS for proper torque. The correct KS sensor torque is 39 N·m (29 lb ft).
 
Engine acceleration will be compromised and automatic transmission (AT) downshifts delayed when operating in the Fail-safe mode.
 
If a DTC P0325 sets while the engine is idling, inspect for a loose connection at the PCM or KS.
 

Trouble Code: P0325



Knock Sensor (KS) Circuit

Possible Causes:

Inspect for the following conditions:



A loose KS can cause a loss of the KS signal. Check the KS for proper torque. The correct KS sensor torque is 39 N·m (29 lb ft).
 
Engine acceleration will be compromised and AT downshifts delayed when operating in the Fail-safe mode.
 
If a DTC P0325 sets while the engine is idling, inspect for a loose connection at the PCM or KS.
 

Trouble Code: P0327



Knock Sensor (KS) Circuit Low Frequency

Possible Causes:

Inspect for the following conditions:



A loose KS can cause a loss of the KS signal. Check the KS for proper torque. The correct KS sensor torque is 39 N·m (29 lb ft).
 
Engine acceleration will be compromised and automatic transmission (AT) downshifts delayed when operating in the Fail-safe mode.
 
If a DTC P0327 sets while the engine is idling, inspect for a loose connection at the PCM or KS.
 

Trouble Code: P0327



Knock Sensor (KS) Circuit Low Frequency

Possible Causes:

Inspect for the following conditions:



A loose KS can cause a loss of the KS signal. Check the KS for proper torque. The correct KS sensor torque is 39 N·m (29 lb ft).
 
Engine acceleration will be compromised and AT downshifts delayed when operating in the Fail-Safe Mode.
 
If a DTC P0327 sets while the engine is idling, inspect for a loose connection at the PCM or KS.
 

Trouble Code: P0328



Knock Sensor (KS) Circuit High Frequency

Possible Causes:

Inspect for the following conditions:



A loose KS can cause a loss of the KS signal. Check the KS for proper torque. The correct KS sensor torque is 39 N·m (29 lb ft).
 
Engine acceleration will be compromised and automatic transmission (AT) downshifts delayed when operating in the Fail-safe mode.
 
If a DTC P0328 sets while the engine is idling, inspect for a loose connection at the PCM or KS.
 

Trouble Code: P0328



Knock Sensor (KS) Circuit High Frequency

Possible Causes:



Inspect for the following conditions:

A loose KS can cause a loss of the KS signal. Check the KS for proper torque. The correct KS sensor torque is 39 N·m (29 lb ft).
 
Engine acceleration will be compromised and AT downshifts delayed when operating in the Fail-Safe Mode.
 
If a DTC P0328 sets while the engine is idling, inspect for a loose connection at the PCM or KS.
 

An intermittent malfunction may be caused by a fault in the KS sensor electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and the components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions present when the DTC first set.
 

Trouble Code: P0335



Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Circuit

Possible Causes:

Check for any of the following conditions:



Check the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor output signal with a scan tool. The scan tool will display engine speed while cranking when the PCM detects the CKP sensor signal. Observe the Engine Speed parameter while cranking the engine. The scan tool should indicate a steady 200-300 RPM while cranking.
 
The CKP sensor performance may be affected by temperature. Check the sensors operation and internal resistance at various temperatures. The CKP sensor resistance when cold should be between 1,630 ohms and 2,740 ohms at -10 to +50°C (14-122°F). The CKP sensor resistance when hot should be between 2,065 ohms and 3,225 ohms at 50-100°C (122-212°F).
 
An intermittent DTC P0335 can be caused by a defective signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and visually inspect the teeth of the signal rotor through the CKP sensor aperture for damage, foreign material, or incorrect installation.
 
A DTC P0335 that sets while driving and checks OK may be caused by inadequate CKP sensor circuit shielding. Check that the CKP sensor circuit is properly shielded and that the drain wire is fastened securely to ground.
 

Trouble Code: P0335



Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Circuit

Possible Causes:

Check for any of the following conditions:



Check the CKP sensor output signal with a scan tool. The scan tool will display engine speed while cranking when the PCM detects the CKP sensor signal. Observe the Engine Speed parameter while cranking the engine. The scan tool should indicate a steady 200-300 RPM while cranking.
 
The CKP sensor performance may be affected by temperature. Check the sensors operation and internal resistance at various temperatures. The CKP sensor resistance when cold should be between 1,630 ohms and 2,740 ohms at -10 to +50°C (+14 to +122°F). The CKP sensor resistance when hot should be between 2,065-3,225 ohms at 50-100°C (122-212°F).
 
An intermittent DTC P0335 can be caused by a defective signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and visually inspect the teeth of the signal rotor through the CKP sensor aperture for damage, foreign material, or incorrect installation.
 
A DTC P0335 that sets while driving and checks OK may be caused by inadequate CKP sensor circuit shielding. Check that the CKP sensor circuit is properly shielded and that the drain wire is fastened securely to ground.
 

Trouble Code: P0339



Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Circuit Intermittent

Possible Causes:

Check for any of the following conditions:



Check the CKP sensor output signal with a scan tool. The scan tool will display engine speed while cranking when the PCM detects the CKP sensor signal. Observe the Engine Speed parameter while cranking the engine. The scan tool should indicate a steady 200-300 RPM while cranking.
 
The CKP sensor performance may be affected by temperature. Check the sensors operation and internal resistance at various temperatures. The CKP sensor resistance when cold should be between 1,630 ohms and 2,740 ohms at -10 to +50°C (14-122°F). The CKP sensor resistance when hot should be between 2,065 ohms and 3,225 ohms at 50-100°C (122-212°F).
 
An intermittent DTC P0339 can be caused by a defective signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and visually inspect the teeth of the signal rotor through the CKP sensor aperture for damage, foreign material, or incorrect installation.
 
A DTC P0339 that sets while driving and checks OK may be caused by inadequate CKP sensor circuit shielding. Check that the CKP sensor circuit is properly shielded and that the drain wire is fastened securely to ground.
 

Trouble Code: P0339



Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Circuit Intermittent

Possible Causes:



Check for any of the following conditions:

Check the CKP sensor output signal with a scan tool. The scan tool will display engine speed while cranking when the PCM detects the CKP sensor signal. Observe the Engine Speed parameter while cranking the engine. The scan tool should indicate a steady 200-300 RPM while cranking.
 
The CKP sensor performance may be affected by temperature. Check the sensors operation and internal resistance at various temperatures. The CKP sensor resistance when cold should be between 1,630 ohms and 2,740 ohms at -10 to +50°C (+14 to +122°F). The CKP sensor resistance when hot should be between 2,065 ohms and 3,225 ohms at 50-100°C (122-212°F).
 
An intermittent DTC P0339 can be caused by a defective signal rotor. Remove the CKP sensor and visually inspect the teeth of the signal rotor through the CKP sensor aperture for damage, foreign material, or incorrect installation.
 
A DTC P0339 that sets while driving and checks OK may be caused by inadequate CKP sensor circuit shielding. Check that the CKP sensor circuit is properly shielded and that the drain wire is fastened securely to ground.
 

An intermittent malfunction may be caused by a fault in the CKP sensor electrical circuit. Inspect the wiring harness and the components for an intermittent condition. Refer to Intermittent Conditions .Repair any electrical circuit faults that were found. Refer to Wiring Repairs .The information included in the Freeze Frame data can be useful in determining the vehicle operating conditions when the DTC first set.
 

 
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