Volkswagen Cars 2000-05

Spark Plugs 3

Print

Removal & Installation



V6 Engines
  1. If necessary, make sure you have the radio code.
  2.  
  3. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  4.  
  5. Remove the top engine cover.
  6.  
  7. If equipped with a cover for the cylinder heads, loosen the clamp screws and lift the cover up and out of the engine compartment.

    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. If equipped with a cover for the cylinder heads, loosen the clamp screws (arrows) and lift the cover up and out of the engine compartment

  8.  
  9. If there is a tool (arrow) for pulling off the spark plug connectors attached to one of the plug connectors, remove the tool from spark plug connector.

    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. If there is a tool (arrow) for pulling off the spark plug connectors attached to one of the plug connectors, remove the tool from spark plug connector

  10.  
  11. Remove the spark plug connectors using the spark plug connector tool. If there is no spark plug connector tool, you can pull the spark plug connectors off using spark plug connector tool T10029, or equivalent .

    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Detach the spark plug connectors (arrows) using a suitable spark plug connector tool

  12.  
  13. Remove spark plugs using a suitable spark plug wrench.

    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Use the proper type wrench to remove the spark plugs

  14.  

To install:

  1. Screw in new spark plugs using spark plug removal tool 3122 B and tighten to 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm).
  2.  
  3. Connect spark plug connectors.
  4.  
  5. Check ignition cables and connectors for proper connections.
  6.  
  7. Install engine covers.
  8.  

V8 Engines
  1. If necessary, make sure you have the radio code.
  2.  
  3. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  4.  
  5. Remove the top engine cover.
  6.  
  7. Remove both side parts of intake manifold as follows:
    1. Unfasten the bolts (arrows), then carefully remove the side part of intake manifold.

      Click image to see an enlarged view

      Fig. Unfasten the bolts (arrows), then carefully remove the side part of intake manifold

    2.  
    3. Remove rubber/metal seal.
    4.  

  8.  
  9. Detach the connectors from ignition coils 1 to 8 (arrows). To release the connectors, use Puller T10166, or equivalent tool.

    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. View of the ignition coil 1-8 connectors (arrows)



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Use the proper type of puller tool to detach the connector from the ignition coils

  10.  
  11. Remove spark plugs using spark plug wrench 3122 B, or equivalent spark plug wrench.
    NOTE
    Properly dispose of used spark plugs!



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Use a spark plug wrench to remove the spark plugs

  12.  

To install:

  1. Install new spark plugs using the spark plug wrench and tighten to 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm).
  2.  
  3. Insert the ignition coil with power output stage into its respective spark plug shaft so that the connector connections make no contact with the cylinder head cover.
  4.  
  5. Push ignition coil with power output stage onto spark plug by hand. They should engage audibly so you know they are connected properly.
  6.  
  7. Install the rubber/metal seal.
  8.  
  9. Carefully install side part of intake manifold and tighten the bolts 71 inch lbs. (8 Nm.)
  10.  
  11. Install the engine cover.
  12.  
  13. Connect the negative battery cable.
  14.  

Spark Plug Heat Range



Spark plug heat range is the ability of the plug to dissipate heat. The longer the insulator (or the farther it extends into the engine), the hotter the plug will operate; the shorter the insulator (the closer the electrode is to the block's cooling passages) the cooler it will operate. A plug that absorbs little heat and remains too cool will quickly accumulate deposits of oil and carbon since it is not hot enough to burn them off. This leads to plug fouling and consequently to misfiring. A plug that absorbs too much heat will have no deposits but, due to the excessive heat, the electrodes will burn away quickly and might possibly lead to pre-ignition or other ignition problems. Pre-ignition takes place when plug tips get so hot that they glow sufficiently to ignite the air/fuel mixture before the actual spark occurs. This early ignition will usually cause a pinging during low speeds and heavy loads.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Spark plug heat range

The general rule of thumb for choosing the correct heat range when picking a spark plug is: if most of your driving is long distance, high speed travel, use a colder plug; if most of your driving is stop and go, use a hotter plug. Original equipment plugs are generally a good compromise between the two styles and most people NEVER have the need to change their plugs from the factory-recommended heat range.

Spark plug heat range is the ability of the plug to dissipate heat. The longer the insulator (or the farther it extends into the engine), the hotter the plug will operate; the shorter the insulator (the closer the electrode is to the block's cooling passages) the cooler it will operate. A plug that absorbs little heat and remains too cool will quickly accumulate deposits of oil and carbon since it is not hot enough to burn them off. This leads to plug fouling and consequently to misfiring. A plug that absorbs too much heat will have no deposits but, due to the excessive heat, the electrodes will burn away quickly and might possibly lead to preignition or other ignition problems. Preignition takes place when plug tips get so hot that they glow sufficiently to ignite the air/fuel mixture before the actual spark occurs. This early ignition will usually cause a pinging during low speeds and heavy loads.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Spark plug heat range

The general rule of thumb for choosing the correct heat range when picking a spark plug is: if most of your driving is long distance, high speed travel, use a colder plug; if most of your driving is stop and go, use a hotter plug. Original equipment plugs are generally a good compromise between the 2 styles and most people never have the need to change their plugs from the factory-recommended heat range.

 
label.common.footer.alt.autozoneLogo