2008 Ford Explorer Thermostat

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  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Water Outlet with Gasket and Thermostat TA2860DL for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # TA2860DL
    • SKU # 165880

    Notes: 192 °F (89 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat Housing Assembly. OEM recommended temperature. Assembly includes Thermostat Housing, Thermostat, Seals and Water Outlet

    • PRICE: 79.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: Yes
    • Gasket Type: Gasket
    • Color: Black
    • Mounting Hardware Included: No
    • Outlet Port Quantity: 3
    • Material: Plastic, stainless steel,
    • Grade Type: Regular

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Water Outlet with Gasket and Thermostat TA2860S for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # TA2860S
    • SKU # 1005786

    Notes: 192 °F (89 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat Housing Assembly. Assembly includes Sensor, Thermostat Housing, Thermostat, Seals and Water Outlet. OEM Recommended Temperature

    • PRICE: 84.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: Yes
    • Color: Black
    • Material: Plastic Steel Copper

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Failsafe Thermostat with Gasket TA2860FS for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # TA2860FS
    • SKU # 1086813

    Notes: 192 °F (89 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat Housing Assembly. Includes housing, Fail-Safe thermostat, seal and water outlet. OEM recommended temperature.

    • PRICE: 99.99

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Failsafe Thermostat 7248-180 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 7248-180
    • SKU # 710644

    Notes: 180 °F (82 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat. Alternate temperatures

    • PRICE: 39.99
    • Sealing Flange Outside Diameter: 2.622
    • Height Between Flanges: 0.965

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Failsafe Thermostat 7265-180 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 7265-180
    • SKU # 710648

    Application: Alternate temperatures

    Notes: 180 °F (82 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat.

    • PRICE: 29.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 180

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Failsafe Thermostat 7265-195 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 7265-195
    • SKU # 361944

    Application: OEM recommended temperature

    Notes: 195 °F (91 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat.

    • PRICE: 24.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 195

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Failsafe Thermostat 7248-192 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 7248-192
    • SKU # 466688

    Notes: 192 °F (89 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat. OEM recommended temperature

    • PRICE: 39.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 192

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Failsafe Thermostat with Gasket TA2860SFS for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # TA2860SFS
    • SKU # 1086851

    Notes: 192 °F (89 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat Housing Assembly. Includes sensor, housing, Fail-Safe thermostat, seals and water outlet. OEM recommended temperature.

    • PRICE: 109.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: Yes
    • Color: Black
    • Material: Plastic Steel Copper

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Gold Thermostat with Gasket 15119DLG for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 15119DLG
    • SKU # 379123

    Application: OEM recommended temperature

    Notes: 195 °F (91 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat. Please discard included seal, additional gasket or seal is required.

    • PRICE: 19.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: Yes
    • Start to Open Temperature: 195

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Gold Thermostat with Gasket 15118DLG for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 15118DLG
    • SKU # 380196

    Application: Alternate temperatures

    Notes: 180 °F (82 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat. Please discard included seal, additional gasket or seal is required.

    • PRICE: 19.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: Yes
    • Start to Open Temperature: 180

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Thermostat 3526 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 3526
    • SKU # 710526

    Notes: 160 °F (71 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat. Alternate temperatures

    • PRICE: 29.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 160

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Thermostat 3527 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 3527
    • SKU # 710527

    Notes: 174 °F (79 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat. Alternate temperatures

    • PRICE: 29.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 170

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Thermostat 3528 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 3528
    • SKU # 710528

    Notes: 180 °F (82 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat. Alternate temperatures

    • PRICE: 29.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 180

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Thermostat 3529 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 3529
    • SKU # 701255

    Notes: 192 °F (89 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat. OEM recommended temperature.

    • PRICE: 24.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 195

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Thermostat 3778 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 3778
    • SKU # 417261

    Application: Alternate temperatures

    Notes: 180 °F (82 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat.

    • PRICE: 9.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 180

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Thermostat 15397 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 15397
    • SKU # 615471

    Application: Alternate temperatures

    Notes: 170 °F (77 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat.

    • PRICE: 9.99
    • Gasket Or Seal Included: No
    • Start to Open Temperature: 170

  • Sponsored
    Sponsored
    Duralast Thermostat 15779 for 2008 Ford Explorer
    • Part # 15779
    • SKU # 743868

    Application: OEM recommended temperature

    Notes: 195 °F (91 °C), Engine Coolant Thermostat.

    • PRICE: 14.99

Customer

Reviews

Reviews for


The Housing is “OK” but not GREAT

The Black Explorer

in 2 years

I see A LOT of people are not installing the housing and filling it up correctly. To properly do the job, remove your old housing and clean the metal flange where the new housing will go. You can use gasket seal on here once it’s clean, which will help better seal up this “common leak area”. Now install the new housing and tighten up each of the 3 long bolts a little at a time until all 3 are snug. Now that the housing is nice and tight, unscrew the 3 (new) small bolts on the thermostat portion. Remove the cover and take out the new thermostat and it’s o-ring, making sure that you remember the positioning of this thermostat! This is where you then take a new jug of antifreeze and fill up the engine portion. With the thermostat removed, pour in some coolant until the coolant level rises to the thermostat. This process allows the air to escape as you fill the internal engine portion. Now insert the thermostat and wet the big o-ring and firmly set it in place with no kinks. Re-install the thermostat cover and tighten the new screws evenly one by one. Attach your hose to the thermostat cover and fill it up with antifreeze and attach other end to radiator. Now fill radiator to the top and install radiator cap. Squeeze the hose a few times... Start with a slow squeezes, remove radiator cap and top off. Squeeze hose again, but this time do a few fast squeezes (but not too hard). Top off again if possible. Start the car and let it idle until it starts to get worm. Go inside and check for heat at dash, and watch until temp gauge starts to rise. Is there heat at dash yet? No. Then keep burping the system, but this time burp the smaller hoses that connect to the thermostat housing. If done correctly, with patience, everything will work out fine. Never go for a test drive right away. Always let a cold engine heat up to normal operation temp on its own first. Leaks start off small at first, but usually don’t show until the engine temp reaches normal. If you catch the leak before it starts, you will still be in your driveway and not 10/30 miles away. ——— I rate this product 4 starts, but I should probably be giving it just 3. The housing is not the same as the OEM (as you could expect). The opening for a 2nd temperature sensor is always knocked out from the factory- which I absolutely HATE. The factory installs a plug in this 2nd hole instead of leaking it sealed the the Motorcraft version. This plug gives the unit an “opportunity” to leak for no real reason. Also, the plug comes with an attachment clip, but they don’t give you a clip for your new or existing temperature sensor. Additionally, if you DO purchase a new temperature sensor from duralast.. that temperature sensor doesn’t come with an attachment clip either. Luckily I was able to use my old rusty one, but not sure what would happen if I misplaced it or mine ended up getting damaged. Beware! Before purchasing a Thermostat, make sure it’s the right one for your vehicle. Every engine is different, and every engine needs a specific thermostat. Thermostats all have a special temperature rating, so reviewers saying the thermostat wouldn’t open up at 180/190 could possibly even have the wrong thermostat. Thermostats don’t open up to let hot coolant into radiator if there is air pockets inside the engine bay. Properly filling up antifreeze as you connect pieces, helps to make sure no air pockets exist. :)

What kind of vehicle do you drive? 2008 Ford Explorer

I see A LOT of people are not installing the housing and filling it up correctly. To properly do the job, remove your old housing and clean the metal flange where the new housing will go. You can use gasket seal on here once it’s clean, which will help better seal up this “common leak area”. Now install the new housing and tighten up each of the 3 long bolts a little at a time until all 3 are snug. Now that the housing is nice and tight, unscrew the 3 (new) small bolts on the thermostat portion. Remove the cover and take out the new thermostat and it’s o-ring, making sure that you remember the positioning of this thermostat! This is where you then take a new jug of antifreeze and fill up the engine portion. With the thermostat removed, pour in some coolant until the coolant level rises to the thermostat. This process allows the air to escape as you fill the internal engine portion. Now insert the thermostat and wet the big o-ring and firmly set it in place with no kinks. Re-install the thermostat cover and tighten the new screws evenly one by one. Attach your hose to the thermostat cover and fill it up with antifreeze and attach other end to radiator. Now fill radiator to the top and install radiator cap. Squeeze the hose a few times... Start with a slow squeezes, remove radiator cap and top off. Squeeze hose again, but this time do a few fast squeezes (but not too hard). Top off again if possible. Start the car and let it idle until it starts to get worm. Go inside and check for heat at dash, and watch until temp gauge starts to rise. Is there heat at dash yet? No. Then keep burping the system, but this time burp the smaller hoses that connect to the thermostat housing. If done correctly, with patience, everything will work out fine. Never go for a test drive right away. Always let a cold engine heat up to normal operation temp on its own first. Leaks start off small at first, but usually don’t show until the engine temp reaches normal. If you catch the leak before it starts, you will still be in your driveway and not 10/30 miles away. ——— I rate this product 4 starts, but I should probably be giving it just 3. The housing is not the same as the OEM (as you could expect). The opening for a 2nd temperature sensor is always knocked out from the factory- which I absolutely HATE. The factory installs a plug in this 2nd hole instead of leaking it sealed the the Motorcraft version. This plug gives the unit an “opportunity” to leak for no real reason. Also, the plug comes with an attachment clip, but they don’t give you a clip for your new or existing temperature sensor. Additionally, if you DO purchase a new temperature sensor from duralast.. that temperature sensor doesn’t come with an attachment clip either. Luckily I was able to use my old rusty one, but not sure what would happen if I misplaced it or mine ended up getting damaged. Beware! Before purchasing a Thermostat, make sure it’s the right one for your vehicle. Every engine is different, and every engine needs a specific thermostat. Thermostats all have a special temperature rating, so reviewers saying the thermostat wouldn’t open up at 180/190 could possibly even have the wrong thermostat. Thermostats don’t open up to let hot coolant into radiator if there is air pockets inside the engine bay. Properly filling up antifreeze as you connect pieces, helps to make sure no air pockets exist. :)

What kind of vehicle do you drive? 2008 Ford Explorer