Subaru Legacy Ignition Lock Cylinder

Buy Online. Pick Up In-Store.

What are you working on today?

Get an exact fit for your Subaru Legacy

1-10 of 10 Results

1-10 of 10 Results

      About


      Subaru Legacy Ignition Lock Cylinder

      The Subaru Legacy ignition lock cylinder is what allows your vehicle to start. When it wears out, it has to be replaced in order to keep your vehicle up and running. The last thing you need is to try to start your car and have nothing happen, so find a durable replacement from AutoZone.

      The Legacy ignition lock wears out over time. The key may fall out, not go in properly or even get stuck if the ignition lock is worn out. To avoid such issues, once you notice something is not right with the cylinder, it’s important to just replace it. AutoZone has the whole ignition lock cylinder for Subaru Legacy, including the new key, so shop our extensive assortment today. We’re all about providing the right products at the right prices and even offer Same Day Store Pickup for online orders.

      Customer

      Reviews

      Reviews for


      Have to cut old one off, no bolts!

      Matt

      in 2 months

      OEM design in that you have to either drill out or cut the old one off. New bolts have the OEM design that as you tighten, the head breaks off. I’m not sure why, since you can remove the electronic switch on the left side with a phillips screwdriver and turn on and off the vehicle that way. Highly recommend a grinder with a cutting wheel. There’s just enough space to move the steering column and get the cutting wheel at the bolts. When mounting new one, the steering lock of the ignition assembly will set into the hole on the bottom of the steering column. I double checked alignment by replacing the steering column plastic covers prior to tightening, which was unnecessary since it lined up perfectly.

      What kind of vehicle do you drive? 1999 Subaru Legacy Outback

      OEM design in that you have to either drill out or cut the old one off. New bolts have the OEM design that as you tighten, the head breaks off. I’m not sure why, since you can remove the electronic switch on the left side with a phillips screwdriver and turn on and off the vehicle that way. Highly recommend a grinder with a cutting wheel. There’s just enough space to move the steering column and get the cutting wheel at the bolts. When mounting new one, the steering lock of the ignition assembly will set into the hole on the bottom of the steering column. I double checked alignment by replacing the steering column plastic covers prior to tightening, which was unnecessary since it lined up perfectly.

      What kind of vehicle do you drive? 1999 Subaru Legacy Outback